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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932
File 003
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 003. May 25, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/162.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 25, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/162

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 003, May 25, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/162.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 13, May 25, 1932
Contributor
  • Jones, A. Gordon
Date May 25, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript X Cerpts of Change BY WENONAH PHELPS —tMK dritx - RAMONA BALDRtDGE, freshman;! hails from Harlingen, Texas; is tall and., Very pretty; sang over the radio and| is now filling engagements at the Rice: Hotel; has sung SAM HOUSTON PICNIC BY BETTY COVINGTON Friday, May 20th, was a memorial day Robert Montgomery; has lots of !(n' seniors of Sam Houston High when boy friends; likes to dance, swim, and 'hey staged their annual Senior Day Jf this gorgeous Spring weather lasts much longer, this is liable to become poet s corner instead of an exchange column. How's this one: Say it with flowers. Say it with sweets, Say it with kisses, Say it with eats, Say it with jewelry, And say it with drink But whatever yojr do Don't say it with ink. rlrag Main on Saturday nights. JIMMIE BRINKLEY represented H '. C. in debate this year; has brown ! curly hair; likes brunettes in pink] '.dresses; graduated from Sam Houston1 ''31; rking way through school; has! 'given up hope of making A in history-1 is president of Platform Club; to study Jaw, ADDISON WOESTEMEYER represented H. J. C. in oratory this year at * * * * . ihe district and state contests; has Manager: All right. Run up the blonde curly hair and brown eyes; cm-tain. [6 feet 2; preacher's son; walks like the .Green Stage Hand: Say, what do you jSlalue oi Liberty; hobby is dramatics; ink I am, a squirrel?—Silver and had le^d in SCIlior P|ay a Jcft" Davis^ lue.. wants to be a senator. GORDON JONES writes poetry, author of 'For H. J. C.;" was named H. C. Honor Society was editor of Picnic at Sylvan Beach. Leaving the school at 9 a. m., the students arrived at Sylvan about 12 o'clock on the Nick- olas. Those not taking the boat, rode; n automobiles. White seemed to be the predominant color, if it can be called a color, for the co-ed frocks. We saw Edith Buckley, Sam Houston favorite of 1931 as well as '32 in a swanky white sport suit, to say nothing of the yellow . *- bathing suit she sported with the tricky g0!ng, little blue coat. We really could not detect the color of the bathing suit from the color of her sun-tan nod skin. FRED R. BlRNEiT^ <Fhe room was dark. It was 2 a. Her father came to the head of the|^ear; is literarv editor of The Cougar; lis 6 feet 2; has blonde curly hair; [crazy about Rena Mai Butler; was Seiven highest intelligence rating in education class; has not decided yet what ie wants to be. EVELYN COCHRAN ran in most opular girl contest; is private secre- ary to the big boss at the Phenix iairy; drinks milk; also eats spinach; ispires to be a writer; tried writing mce but could not read own writing, practicing on a typewriter; won honorable mention when she represented H. J. C. in one-act play con- wants to learn several foreign languages ;not crazy about boys; gi.es with Lillian Swartz; dresses like her; makes excellent grades. LOUISE SHEPPERD won Sophomore scholarship last year, member of Honor Society was editor of Cougar one year; writes excellent hues t stories; has been attending H. J. C. for five years ;has won cash prizes in numerous essay and stairs and called. No answer. He called again. Still no answer. Angrily striding into the parlor, he switched on the lights. JJo one was there.—Colic be Life. A reformer is a guy who would have you believe he would have handed Eve back her apple untasted.-^Junior Ranger. s Mary had a little lamb, Given by a friend to keep. It followed her around until It died from loss of sleep. —Lone Star Lutheran. According to the Printer's Devil, a publication of Sam Houston Senior High, the depression has affected colleges and universities in an interesting manner. In many instances the enrollment of girls has fallen off. Since many students in this insti- ution are from nearby towns, A'ish to call your attention to the prog- well mebbe that is exaggerating a bit, ]ress made by the rural schools. / but you know what I mean. She real- Vast forward strides made by Web- ly looked swell. ster High School makes it an outstand- But Edith held no light to the de- ing example of these small schools mure Irene Manint, dressed in a shell which have fought tirelessly for recog- pink outfit. We didn't have the | nition. Boys and girls graduating from Webster are now on an equal basis with their .city brothers and suit, but we pleasure of casting little brunette in a su: have our own illusions. Lamonte Hicks chose white for her frock, and she really can i Blonds in white, what a pictui Annelle Trammel and Grace Dun-! lap both wore a white sport dress, and| did they get the royal rush from the] male sex. Even our own Marjorie Nelson, the intellectual as well as popular, sported a white dress. You all remember Lupe Chavez, not quite so brunette as the screen star of the cinema world, but called a brunette just the same, and we really were not disappointed in the way her white sports dress was hung on the figure. She looked like a million. Now for the male element. I really did not pay much attention to the attire, but they all looked good to me, though some of them were sun burned explained ,„„ b„ys who could „oi get "• "J'"** slender. jobs were sent back to school, since it costs but little more to keep them school than at home, while girls, many of whom do not work, have been kepi at home as an economy measure. , X is the Roman nutation for ten. ; the mark of illiterate men. . X is a ruler removed from the throne \ X*s a quantity wholly unknown. v may mean Xenon, a furious gas. a is a ray of a similar class. X-mas is Christmas, a season of bliss. X in a letter is good for a kiss. X is for Xerxes, a monarch renowned.; X marks the spot where the body was found, —Exchange, i' Aged man (in front of college) | once a freshman in that college Stude: So what I. ALEXANDER MURRELLE, married; president of Speakers' Club last fall; has 23 college credits; has completed beyond recognition. Billy Banter and Hugo Treschwig, the inseparable pair must have stayed in the water at least three-fourths of the time. We didn't fail to notice W. T. Parish, S. H.'s Greek God, and believe me, he didn't fail to notice Edith B., if you get what I Louis and Tom Harling were both there. Louis acted kinda funny, wonder what the trouble was. He certainly J did keep up the old S. H. spirit. (We mean the bottled kind.) Goat Gillespie was there too, and he seemed to be enjoying himself as well as the company of a certain young r , I I could mention numerous more, Sam HoUSton AlUmni I just had the space, but I just have £##*####*####*##*##■*##*#*#• to put something about "Hudge." Ht . had charge of the entertainment corn- When one hears a loudI laugh or | ^^ whkh fa ,nuff sajd The com, burp, one knows it's Miss Gladys Ja- mit(ee met at his home the night ^ cobs in person. fore tbe picnjc and made the plans. I'll Rip" Harrison, an old Sam Hous- leave the rest to the imagination of The Tyler Junior College and High! tonite, is now the star reporter on the those who know "Hudge" as to whether School have combined forces and put Cougar. 'they had a good time, -•ut a joint paper known as the Apache- RCna Mai Butler and Clyde Smalley The gang di if.on Pow-Wow. It's a keen paper. : arc stiH as thick as they were in the and his ex-Met orchestra until the wee "good olo days." hours, and all came home with happy : And Frances Nesmith is still makeing memories of a memorable day. j the good grades she did in high school. P S. Juniors as well as sophomores i Lynn Galeemer still brags about "how enjoyed this excursion, but Sh-sh, sisters, when they register at a higher institution of learning. The phenominal upshoot in educational rating has so encouraged the scholastic eligibles in and around Webster community that the number of students graduating from the high school in recent years has increased four and five times over the classes of seven and eight years ago. Houston Junior College extends a hearty invitation to the twenty-two Webster graduates and to the graduating classes of the many other rural schools to enroll at H. J. C. and go to college "at home" in September. The hour is fast approaching when you must give the farewell handclasp to your school pals and to your instructors. So scattered will the sophomores become that this farewell will not be a mere "so long" but a "Goodbye, buddy, hope our paths will cross again some day." The many happy hours spent at our social functions, assembly meetings, club gatherings and even lectures, have knitted together a sentimental feeling that will always start a happy surge when thoughts of "good ole H. J. C." occupy our minds in days to come. Which reminds us that we would now like to confront the greatly misinformed youth who told us a year ago that "There is no school spirit at Houston Junior College, no big sport calendar, etc., etc.," U he and his big time football, parties, good times, etc., can create in | him a bigger love and more respect for his school than the policies followed by our Junior College officials in dealing with the students, then we will admit that we made a mistake. And when the big thrills of college football and other big time college sports can take the place of the close Father: You say you flunked French, I can't understand it. Son: I can't either. That's why I flunked it. —Sunset Stampede. The S. T. C. Star contains a cute poem entitled "Creative Stuff." We'd like very much to reprint it here, but it's too long, so we'll just tell you about it. It's clever. All about the wooing of the maiden Palmolive by the Indian brave Mentholatum, and how Mentholatum shoots Sears Ro- bucks with his trusty Pierce Arrow. The following cracks were taken from Johnson Judge of Albert Sidney Johnson Junior High. Not half bad if yejJ ask us. Physicians often look at the tongue I to find trouble in the body. By listening | to that same miscievious clatterer we often discover the trouble with the bnin. About the time a ir ing he's a big gun, ti gets to think- so mebody fires The cross-eyed man may be straight, but he never looks that way." Cop (to stalled motorist): Say get I along, what's the matter with you? Motorist (arcastically): Why Pm just fine thank you, but I think my engine's dead—Ranger. The cabinet of Jugoslavia forbids high school girls to rouge their lips. That ought to improve the rouge business in that country.—Thresher. Angry widow: He didn't leave thing. I want you to take that "Rest | in peace" off the "tombstone. Stone 'Cutter: I'm sorry, I can't do that, but I can put something under- leath. i he got drunk" last night. ] Wilma Lindsey, a Sam Houston beauty, gets prettier every day. Sam Houston high school is insured because Ruth Depperman attempted to burn it down several times in order to get out. Anna Sloane, a proud senior at Jr. College, was once the same at S. H. Grace Schoelman, our old histoiy, hails from S. H. too. And one cannot think of S. H. without thinking of her greatest sheik, Harold Renfro. ' Melbadel Wright, Jr. College's best dressed girl, made history at S. H.l And it will take a long time to count the accomplishments of James Julian in high school and in college. What-a- Some people dont beleve in love at first sight but "Tiny" Edmundson sure Jr. College sure made a "scoop" when they raked Betty Covington in. Marian Robinson sure jates at Jr. College, (especially with a certain young gentleman.) And there's Florence Kendrick, our journalism shark. Our dear old college would not be complete without Lucy Tally. keep this under your hat. r ,r. i companionship of the students anu iced to the tunes of Vic: * , ,, . „ .„ , ,. structors at this college we will further admit that school sprit is lacking. And when some "Whoozis" University lad, lost in the thousands at his place of study, convinces us that the [prestige of just the name of "deah ole j Whoozis" will outweigh a heart to heart talk with Assistant Dean Dupre or with Dean of Women, Mrs. Pearl Bender, we will then promise to withdraw our argument concerning school spirit—but, as matters stand, we will recommend that little brother enter Houston Junior College. FREAK ACCIDENTS Tho accidents briefly discussed here actually happened and are not exaggerated. They are collected from the files of a large insurance company, and premiums have been collected on some of them. During a petting party at an unnamed place, a number of broken ribs I were sustaised by a male member, and they were supposed to have been i broken in tbe arbor of the embrace of . his petting partner. He collected compensation from his insurance company. A man ran a lawn mover over a cartridge which was laying in the grass, and the cartridge was exploded, injuring the man seriously. A sober man stumbled over a cow while taking a stroll, and collected damages for his injured dignity; while while in England another sober fellow (?) succeeded is running into an elephant. A horseshoe which was being used '' as a good luck sign, fell from its position above a door and struck a man I who was passing beneath it. A man | in Rhode Island broke his neck while j doing a fancy dive into his bed. A Frenchman was struck five times by lightning during his lifetime, and lived to die in bed of pneumonia. The ' computed chance of one person being struck five times by lightning is about 1 to 2,000,0000,000,000,000,000,000. Or in another way, the average person would have to live two thousand million billion lifetimes to have such an In Newark, N. J., an electric light company lineman fell off a high pole and landed almost beside a passing ambulance, whose surgeon gave him emergency attention and saved his life. A man in Brooklyn, N. Y., was awakened during the night by his telephone. When he answered he found that the caller had the wrong number. Smelling gas while on his way back to bed, he investigated and found all the rest of the family un- SEEN AT THE PICNIC two years at South Texas School of Law; represented Law School as a debater; defeated H. J. C; drives a Packard; holds down a responsible position with the Houston Lighting and Power Company; is lobbying to make Junior College a Senior College. Mrs. Murelle, a Rice graduate also attends H. J. C. Never before was Sylvan Beach so literally full of hungry Cougars witlj sun-tanned faces. One of the beginning features of the picnic was a| baseball classic which proved to be quite a thriller. Pat Foley was trying to explain to the spectators about what a good opportunity he had to kill Mr. Hooker when he rounded third base, but it seems that Mrs. Hooker was nearby and overheard the conversation; consequently Pat decided it might have been two other people. The main attraction of the game though was Cy Shaw who was clad in one of those new fangled topless bathing suts—but this, dear friends, is not a true test of popularity, four out of every five have it—the other doesn't need it—he's dead.—Nora Louise Calhoun said that she would spend O. D.'s ready change on the "Dodgems" any day. Mack Douglas was no slouch when it came to scuddling one of those contraptions either. Mildred Chandler said she thought it was fun, but she felt sure that she could get about as much enjoyment out of something that was not quite so rough. Gordon Jones, LeRoy Melcher, and Vic Vebel confessed that they thought the train was by far the snappiest amusement offered at the park. Incidentally, they were given two free rides on the tram. Jean Weatherall and Exna Throg- morton spent most of the afternoon riding on a motorcycle—speed is what they crave and plenty of it. And were we surprised when we saw Hulda Alexander flirting with a root- beer man—we never know what to expect next. Bill Spitler and Roger Bell spent most of the afternoon in WHAT ARE YOU DJUNKING? Perhaps you would like to take a peep inside a liquor chemistry laboratory before you sing out "Bottom Up" at your next party. An American liquor chemist, working for Uncle Sam, recently made these enlighten- isg remarks: We average testing 2,500 samples of liquor seized in Texas and Oklahoma .each year. Last year we ,found one sample that was actually bottled in bond. The other samples ran from pretty fair to pretty terrible. The agents reported finding pigs, chickens, cockroaches, and even a skunk is the mash. There account for the organic matter found when tests were made. Whisky is rarely found that is actually poisonous. It is a kind of slow poison. The worst thing about boot- ' leg whiskey is the acids and raw | aldclydes left because the distillers do not know how to make it, for they will not do so if they are able. "Most people think fusel oil is poisonous, but as a matter of fact, fusel oil is found in real good whiskey." As to the infailability of blue flame test, whisky, booth good and bad, burns with a blue flame because of the alcoholic content, not because it is pure. Most bootleg whiskey would greatly improved by a few months a charred keg. The charcoal absorbs conscious and r ng gas fumes, man at death fro: Hillsdale, Mich., was rossing a street carrying a spare tire when an automobile hit v him and ■mocked him twenty feet. He lit on tire and escaped with minor The bath tub rates as a deadly weapon in the United States. In one 'ear in New York City, 95 people were tilled while bathing, and' 95 killed by ailing objects; so it is just as danger- )us to walk through the streets as to ake a bath! i
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