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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 002. May 25, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/161.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 25, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/161

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 002, May 25, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/161.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 13, May 25, 1932
Contributor
  • Jones, A. Gordon
Date May 25, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript H. J. C. GRADUATES TO TEACH CLASS OF '33 JUNE 3 With the approval of the faculty and Mr. Dupre, the students of H. J. C. are again doing that which has not been done before. The graduates will have the honor as well as the responsibility of teaching all the class Friday, June 3. It was after much consideration and work that this plan was sanctioned by Dean Dupre, With the understanding that the graduates would confer with the instructors of the classes that they were to teach and obtain In full detail the work expected of them, Dean DuprCj. consented to that which the graduat-j ing class of '32 wishes to initiate custom in the institution. Much has been said of this pla late, but due to the examination schedule and the unavoidable, the date, has been changed from Wednesday) May 25 to Friday, June 3. Friday. June 3rd is the last day o: school. The writer knows what spiri and feeling usually prevails on the evt of a three months vacation—a spiri of free will, happiness, and good will; We know that many minds will not be in the books that day, but as a favor to the graduating class and teaching you, we ask you to give then] your sincere co-operation. The graduates are not obligated tcl attend school the last week, but wil consider it a pleasure to come bacl| and teach the class that will be graduating next year and carrying on : plan toward being a custom, one o the first in H. J. C. history. 1 The third regular session opened September 16, 1929, with 584 students and a faculty of 30. With the February term, enrollment increased to 785. On September 15,. 1930, the fourth annual sesion began with an enrollment of 720, and a faculty of 31. The j enrollment increased with the February term to 858. This is the largest enrollment in the history of the Junior College. The 1931 term began September 21, with 615 students. Enrollment decreased to 535 during the February term. Playing approximately twenty-five j games. Coach French's varsiy squad |had a remarkable season, losing oi.ly | four games. The team competed with - I some of the classiest amateur cage PAGE TWO Qrf ay MONDAY, JUNE 6, MARKS OPENING OF SUMMER SESSION at Junior College Begin June 8; To End July 15 F. M. BLACK The summer session for the Houston Junior College will open Monday, June 6, with registration on that date and June 7th. There will be but the one term of six weeks. Classes will begin on Wednesday, Juno 8, and will close Friday, July. 15. The late registration fee of $2.5ut will be changed after Tuesday. The* fees for the summer session for those who have never attended the Junior College are as follows: Matriculation fee $ 5.00 Library fee .. - 2.00 Tutition for two courses... _ 30.00 Total „...$37.0fl If but one course is taken, the tutition will be $18.00. Students who havt attended the college before will not be required to pay the matriculatior fee. Courses may be obtained from thi following teachers: Harris, Rees French, Schuman, Soule, Hooker Miller, Miner, Rucker, Stevens, Ker) bow, Henderson, Bishkin, Steele, Sim- mons. Classes will be from 7:30 unti 2:00 for five days a week. The junior high school and thi elementary school teachers should bi especially intrusted in the industria education course, Ed. 2131, given b; Miss Steele. This course is the practical activities work used in the uni type of teaching. THE ORGANIZATION OF THE AWARDS PRF^ENTEr HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE "" ililUiJ i ALOLlliLiL After a conference with representatives from the State Department of Education, University of Texas, Rice Institute, and Sam Houston State Teachers College, the Houston Junior College was established by the Board of Education in the spring of 1927. The first session opened June 5, 1927, in the San Jacinto High School building with a faculty largely taken from the staffs of the University of Texas and Sam Houston State Teachers College. Two hundred thirty-two students were enrolled for this session and courses were offered in education, Spanish, English, history, biology, art and physical education. The first regular sesson opened September 19, 1927, with a faculty and staff of 21. 460 students enrolled in this session. Full Freshman and Sophomore work was offered, special provisions being made for groups preparing for professional courses in medicine, engineering, dentistry and law. During the first year, all work being done, was inspected by the State Department of Education and the college was recognized as a Junior College of the first class, and under the law, entitled to full certificate privileges. The college was again inspected later in the spring and was recognized as a class A. Junior College. of the fact that no building was available for the college, it had to hold its sessions in the San Jacinto High School building in the afternoon and evening hours from 4 to 9:30 o'clock. TO MEMBERS OF CAGE SQUADS Twenty-Two Medals Givei To Participants by Archie W. French In recognition of the sterling effor put forth by the members of the boy and girls' varsity basketball teams i forming two of the best teams ever t perform under the name of House* Junior College, the school presenter the members of these two teams witl silver basketball awards at the Wed nesday night assembly meeting. Equally as important,' but not al widely advertised was the four-mai track team of H. J. C. that carried i heavy burden on their shoulders throughout the year and were rewarded with medals signifying their ability in certain events. Those lettering on the boys' varsity basketball were: Bob Brahnam; Harry Matthews, Malcolm Pech, Allen Weed, George Gayle, Chuck Snyder, Bill Jeter, and Walter Scarborough. Those winning track medals are Allen Weed, shot put; Ed Candler, shot put; Gordon Taylor, hurdles; "Moose" Gonzales, discus and javelin. Girls earning cage awards ate: Avis Sparks, E. Rummell, Doris McVicker, Lou "Matthews" Gaines, Lula Grace Kellogg, Loretta Eslinger, Louise Morgan, and Bernice Blackshere. In a surprise move, the girls' coach was presented with a small basketball The second regular sesson of the charm wmch wag av,arded in appre_ iHouston Junior College opened Sep- dation rf her excelIer,t coaching to tember 17, 1928, with an enrollment of which ^ majority of ^ praise goes ■ 510 students, and a faculty of 25. The. for the gjrls, basketball wam which | enrollment increased to 615 in the Feb- jhad a perfect soaSon. j ruary term. ^0BHBVT WHY NOT rfc^rC? High school seniors, faced by the fact that their finances will be low, ai.d that they may be unable to attend college either this summer or next fall, will welcome Houston Junior College as a solution to their dilemma. While high school graduates think of college, other students who have finished their freshman year at out-of- tbe-city colleges, may find that they will be unable to return to their school next fall. . For these students Houston Junior College offers an opportunity to continue their college career without interruption, at greatly lessened cost, which they would be unable to do if they went to some distant school. Or again, many parents, feeling that Of The Houston Junior Collegi Houston, Texas Established 1928| Published semi-monthly during tht college year. Subscriptions, $1 per year. Single copies. 10 cents. EDITORIAL STAFF Issue Editor A. Gordon Jones Managing Editor A. Marks Assistant Editor . ... James Julian Faculty Advisor F. R. Birney DEPARTMENT HEADS Sport Editor V. F. Harrison News Editors - - Betty Covington Florence Kendrick Feature Editor L. Ray Pell Literary Editor A. Gordon Jones Humor Editor jhlth Depperman Exchange Editor Wenonah Phelps REPORTERS James Page, Cy Shaw, Herman Lewis, Anna Sloan, Louis Higginbotham, and E. O. Boulet. —Cuts courtesy Houston Post DEAR OLD COLLEGE The Houston Junior College is a! continual source of pride to the citi-, zens of Houston and is filling a position] of distinct usefulness in the educational system of the city, A casual glance at the enrollment figures which have shown a steady annual increase should dispell any doubts as to whether it is meeting a need in the community..' Many who find it necessary to work! during the day are given an opportunity to continue their studies in the evening under the capable guidance ofj^ well-trained instructors using the spli did equipment of the college. Other1 students, who, for one reason or other, do not go away to school, remain at home and secure the first two years of college work that will be accepted by any college or university affiliated with the Texas Association of Colleges and the State Department of Education. The student body is recruited from serious-minded individuals who are seeking an education, but this does not mean that the extra-curricula activities are neglected—far from it! The dramatic and public speaking clubs, the athletic teams, and the school paper furnish ample opportunity for the students to develop their talents in their chosen fields. The class organizations and other clubs contribute to the social life of the school and sponsor various activities throughout the year. Democracy is the keynote of the student organization. Everyone is given an equal opportunity to take part in the activities of the college. Since there are no "upper classmerv" freshman and sophomore students are permitted to assume positions of leadership that would-be denied to them at a four- year institution. The faculty is absolutely second to none and is made up of experienced educators who are well-equipped in their particular fields. Because of the ii small size of the classes, every stu- J dent has the advantage of individual I and personal attention which these in- | structors are so Wei qualified to give. The cost has been kept to a minimum so that as many as possble may re- j, eeive the benefits of the college. The cost of a full five-year course program including tuition, fees, books, and incidentals is usually less than two hundred dollars for the entire year. The calendar for the year is well filled with dramatic presentations, athletic contests, speaking tournaments, dances, receptions, outings sponsored by the college to provide entertainment outside of the classroom. What with the highest type of work | offered under capable instructors, the j use of the well-stocked library and laboratories, combined with the enjoyment of all the other activities , which the college presents it is easy to j understand the popularity of the Houston Junior College. It has been said by a well-known authority that a junior college should present the first two years of college work better than a four-year college if it is to serve the purpose for which it was intended. Certainly the Hous- » ton Junior College is serving the pur- , pose for which it was intended and - serving it well when judged by this SUE G0REE THOMASON ;;ting class hope stitute the custom of allotmg one day each year for the seniors to teach the classes. The rlns h;:<i in mind at the time to establish n tradition that will live on after the present students have completed their work at this school, Tho Athletic Department is proud of the success that boxing has met with. In three shows thirty-two boxers performed before a crowd estimated at over 1200 people. This sport has more drawing power than any other sport I ever presented to the student body. Junior college boasts of the success of three basketball teams last year. The boys' and girls' varsity met with such success that a banquet was given to fete the two teams. In track, the Cougar luminaries of the cinder paths managed to grab ' [| fourth place in the state meet in San Antonio. The baseball team was hampered by lack of candidates, however, they made a good showing despite their handi- Intramural tennis and swimming held their share of attention during their i seasons. In concluding it is clearly seen that ; the Junior College has an abundance of activities, both socially and athletically, to interest students in all phases of recreative work. HARVEY W. HARRIS their sons and daughters are graduating from senior high school while still so young that they need to continue in the home environment, will welcme H. J. C. as an ideal place for gaining the first two years of college training, after which these students may attend the distant school of their choice. All in all, the value of Houston Junior College is well understood, but never has its value been more apparent than at this moment, when so manyj difficulties stand in the way of sending the youth of Houston to distant colleges and universities. And remember: Houston Junior College requires that its class work be done thoroughly, that its students gain training at least the equivalent of that offered in any other schools, and that|| its credits are readily acceptible in the nation's greatest colleges and universities. So attend H. J. C, live at home, and save money. ANOTHE Sf^ 0. U. T. SIPPERS Oh boy! Are these ex-San Jacinto females burning up the J. C. males? Take Portia Garrot, the little girl who never says anything. She has Bill Spit- IAR 'ler chewing nails waiting for another ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H date with her, while John Hill gets With the present school year coming dates with hpr fof momhs jn advalic6 to a close it is interesting to note that 'Then there is Harold Renfro who acts the past year was one of the most as an emergency date, brilliant periods of social activities Peggy Berling evidently does not give ever enjyed by the institution. In re- f- whoop for any H. J. C. lad, (just like ., . , , , -. , l„ iLuckel), but is always seen with a tall vi..'v.-ir:L,' the social calendar it may oe J fellow who once went to Sam Hous- noted that more events were able to ton and is said to ^ a fair amateur find places for themselves than ever ball player. Where Peggy lets off, her sidekick Jean "Slanteye" Wetherall gets started. Jean's succes may be attributed to the way she dunks. Her before. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ i There were six dances that were given in connection with the Junior College social events. Three of the six were i given by the school in the gym—each ibeing a reception either for entering (students or for high school seniors. The | Sophomore class were the sponsors of two, their annual dance and a pre- Thanksgiving Day event. The Fresh- class held their dance admirers are the following: ''Gigolo" Robinson, Fred Aebi, Chuck Snyder, and Freddie "Somebody?" who does not go to the school. This Freddie truly writes some notes. Talk about | mush, they make mush look like a slab j of concrete. And we almost forgot Al- | len Segrest of Central who gives Jean the big rush at dances. ^^_^^^^^^^__^^^^^^^^^_ Although Pat Foley is not a female, 1 cording to the practices of their class.l he is a flame just the same. Talk to , The Dramatic classes held their sharef Pat awhile and you will discover that j of the social spotlight by presenting two three-act plays and competing in the state one-act play contest. A beauty contest was held in which; the candidates were elected by popular vote. Nelda Smth was voted the Most Beautiful Sophomore, and Ruth Depperman was elected as the Most Beautiful in the freshman class. The Junior College continued to dominate the Oratorical fields by plac-l ing Evelyne Bashara and Addison Woestemeyer first in the dstrict meet in San Antonio. The boys' debating team composed of A. Gordon Jones and Jimmie Brinkley, and under the supervision of H. W. Harris, enjoyed a successful season. They only lost one decision and took on all comers. Hulda Alexander and Rena Mai But- he must be a real whataman. If it v not for his broken wrist, Pat would ! wipe up in the boxing tournaments, win the tennis title, letter in basketball, and be a one-man track team. Ask him why he does not do something and listen to him tell about his wrist. Malcolm Pech gave everyi, i a break when he strutted up and down the beach at the picnic, and showed off his swelegant figure. Years of camp life, months of back breaking labor, and years of athletic participation, list the reasons why his "muckles" are large ones. Pech is said to be able to Hit the front end of a steam roller. We understand that one of the Allen i twins is engaged and has been for some time. Poor kid, we offer her our deep j felt sympathy. Her sister, which ever talking about, is not af- runs | elected the Most Beautiful anj Most Popular girls respectively. The flicted with the love sickna election was held by popular vote with around like a crazy woman, each student entitled to only one vote. Those Lee twins {not girls), look They represented the school at the fifth alike, talk alike, and are alike. When annual reception. J^^^^^^^^^^_— The students' association under the able leadership of Cy Shaw staged a picnic and field day at Sylvan Beach park. It is hoped to make this an annual affair. It was the first event of , day, it's nature ever held by the Junior weal college. i teacher calls on one for something and he does not know it, his brother will answer and the teacher chalks down a good grade for the silent one. And they dress exactly alike every to the color j^f-their under .lor of-4heir
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