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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932
File 001
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 001. May 25, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2018. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/160.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 25, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/160

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 001, May 25, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2018, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/160.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 13, May 25, 1932
Contributor
  • Jones, A. Gordon
Date May 25, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript GRADUATES THE COUGAR PUBLISHED BY THE JOURNALISM STUDENTS OF THE HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE HOUSTON, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1932 FIRST ANNUAL PICNIC OF COLLEGE HELD AT BAY THURSDAY Majority of H. J. C. Students Attend, Play Ball, Dine, Swim, Bowl, and Dance Last Thursday Houston Junior College held its first annual picnic at Sylvan Beach. The majority of the students furnished their own transportation, which left but a few to meet Mrs. Bender at *?&■ the designated place, Texas Avenue m_ at Crawford Street, at one o'clock. j Some of the students arrived at I Sylvan earlier than the majority and had a "tan" to show the later arrivals. After the majority arrived, two ball games were started that resulted in much enthusiasm and two minor casualties. "Old folks" just can't stand the grind was the conclusion of Mr. Rees and Cy Shaw after they were forced to retire from the game due to a sprained ankle and a "char- ley horse." Those who thought the water too cold found amusement playing "skeo ball", at the shooting gallery, riding the "dodg-em" and watching the moon come up. Due to a meeting Mr. Dupre and Dr. Oberholtzer were detained in town and didn't arrive until after six o'- When asked if he were having a nice time, Dr. Oberholtzer said he didn't have time for an interview for any one but the fried chicken in front of That night many stayed for the dance in Sylvan Beach dance pavil- lion, and readily admitted that they hated to see the orchestra quit playing. Windy turned out to be a different.— pilot. He was handed a pitchfork, toldl to go in a stable and pilot all in a pile. It seemed that someone had fed Renfro's nag grapenuts, because he ran away no less than 90 times. Melbadel Wright and Marion Adams became detached from the rest of the party and could not be found. After a two hour search (and at about 2 p. x.) they were found where they were left. Marion positively refused to "get aboard that horrible beast". Despite the fact that everybody involved had to breakfast off the proverbial mantlepiece, a good time was enjoyed by all. Horseback riding is a great sport, if it doesn't make you the beginning it will in the FORMER STUDENT TO BE MARRIED Miss Lula Mae Smith and Mr. Dwight Hall Austin are to married June 29 at high noon in the Palm Memorial Church. Their engagement has recently been announced. Miss Loraine Romane is to be maidj of honor and Mrs. Martha Schilling her matron of honor. The wedding will be small and only the close relatives and intimate friends will be present. PRESIDENT E. E. OBERHOLTZER FINAL BOXING SHOW WILL BE HELD IN GYM FRIDAY NITE Large Crowd Expected To Witness Final 1932 Ring Show Friday night will mark the final boxing and wrestling show to be staged by the H. J. C. this year. This _-_.__. - - ,--- „,- n_ S tSrr/^r'rs JOURNALISM TO BE most interesting and exciting event ever staged in the annals oi the school. Something hitherto untried will be added to the list of events—that of several wrestling matches. The show would have been staged last Friday, but most of the prospectice participants were sunburned so badly that it was decided to postpone the whole thing for another week. A large crowd is expected previous occasions the gym has been packed. Don't forget the time or place — San Jacinto gym at 9:30. Probable performers will be as follows: Lou Lurie, Bob Branham, H. D. Mathews, Herman Lewis, Art Burns, Chuck Snyder, Harold Renfro, Walter Scarborough, and Jame3 Ju- In the feature bout "Pilot" Milford Smith will lock horns with Willie Slider. This has the appearance of being a nip and tuck affair as both boys are clever and willing to mix it. ELIZABETH KERBOW TO LEAD OATH OF ALLEGIANCE Miss Elizabeth Kerbow has been named to lead the Oath of Allegiance given by all the members of the graduating classes of Houston on Commence- ■:,!■ Stadium. Miss Kerbow was selected because of her high grades. Members of the high school graduating classes and of the Junior College graduating class will' participate in the exercises. DR. T. 0. WALTON WILL ADDRESS GRADUATES Combined Senior Classes Will Hear A. & M. President r. T. O. Walton, president of A. & College will deliver the Houston Junior College and Senior High School commencement address at Buffalo Stadium, 8:15 p. m., June 1, according to Mrs. Pearl C. Bender. Music will be furnished by the All BUD STEEGER IS FAVORED TO WIN TENNIS TQURNE1 Bob Branham, R. Marshal Lose in Close Gaines; JlCity m* Soho,>1 Band ™d by TTty ¥i-ti r? e -i " Episcopal quartet which is directed by Hill Forfeits. Mrs w H Hoeue The invocation will be given by Rev. Clark W. Lambert, Pastor of Heights First Christian Church and Rev. Franklin Henderson will lead Bud Steeger, crack Humble Cc single star, and V. Karney, prominen city amateur player, will meet Satur .day at the recreation courts in the titl match for the championship of thfP y ' „ , _ , _ „ _, f m .' Miss Elizabeth Banett Kerbow, who , Houston Jumor College Class A Temu|has hjgh schoiarship in ^ Houston Tournament. i Junior College, will lead the oath of Steeger advanced to the finals wher allegia he upset Dick Marshall, former mem- — ber of champ Heights doubles team 6-4, 6-4, while Karney took a 6-3, 4-6 6-4 match from Bob Brahnam, las year's tournament winner. J. Hill for feited when he failed to meet Karne; in the first round of play. Doped to win by pre-match predi tions, Karney relied on his powerfu OFFERED SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS MOONLIGHT RIDE HELD BY STUDENTS Lovers of horseflesh had a chance last Wednesday to show what they could do with the sport when a group of J. C. students held a moon-light horseback riding party. The party rode from Johnny Walker's Riding Academy. Vic Voebel, popular senior president was ehaperone. Milford Smith was the power behind the wheel that made the affair possible and much credit is due him for making the occasion possible. However, before the ride stirted Windy bragged about how well he knew the woods, and he would be needed to serve as pilot thru the wooded areas. But upon arriving Students will be given an opportunity to enroll for two courses in journalism for the summer term, according to announcement by Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, president of the college. Short story writing, feature story writing, and editorials will be studied in one class, while the other course will give training in news writing and editing, sport and society writing, and general newspaper work. These two classes will be opened at once for registration and if fifteen or more students enroll for each, they will be included in the summer schedule. If less than fifteen enroll, the classes will not be offered. Any student in the College may enroll in either class, and outsiders may take this work as special students, provided that they do not intend to HORSEBACK "se ,,he„°™dit(f" f0^8" /T'™" ments. If the student is regularly enrolled, or is a high school graduate, both courses will be accepted for college credit. Mr. Fred R. Birney, head of the journalism department in the Junior, College and the public schools, will be in charge of the classes. "If we have a fair number of students in each of these classes, we will continue the Cougar, and will give members of the classes practical training in the printing of the paper by allowing them to serve as reporters and editors", Mr. Birney said. "Each issue several of the students will work in the printing concern and help edit and publish the Cougar, thus gaining valuable practical experience." Miss Smith has been entertained] with a linen shower given by Miss Romanet and a miscellaneous shower by Mrs. E. R. Boby. Miss Alma Dorchester, Mrs. Glenn McCarthy and her sister Miss Neone Lee, Miss Susie Rose Alexandrie and Miss Marjorie Cowan will also entertain the bride to be with a series of parties. FAIR CO-EDS STAGE LADY GODIVA ACT HELP! P. L. COOPER, JR. The cry for help is heard many times a day in our large cities. In New York City the cry wil be answered by a big 57-horsepower truck. On this truck a serve and accurate placements to stop two hundred and fifty-seven pieces of the famed smashing attack of Brah- whose shots were wild anc equipment for use in emergencies. Included in this are 1500 feet of rope, life. , gun case and canister, ladders, erratic. The last set was a nip andj J^j^ oxyacetylene torches, and many tuck affair with both playing superb other pieces of equipment. There are tennis. Brahnam fought like a demor also the machine gun, shotguns, tear- to stop the onslaughts of the steady gas and smoke bombs, gas masks, i Karney but could not drive the ball bullet-proof vests. The truck is with sureness, for his backhand con- chage of a sergeant and is manned by tinued to smash into the net. a crew which is thoroughly trained i Coupling a fast cannoball serve with every way for emergencies. a powerful forehand smash, Steeger When the emergency department we pulled the surprise of the tournament started a sergeant was assigned a truck in upsetting Marshall. Steeger took and given a crew of picked men. Now, less than seven years later, this de partment consists of 19 trucks, on ipector, seven lieutenants, 62 sergeants, and 405 patrolmen. The trucks and crews are located at strategic points throughout the city and its suburbs and are ready for work at any time of the day or night. the court as underdog but lost no time! 1 in winning recognition and applai from the gallery. The net game of sj Marshall was exceptional for when the £ Heights lad met the ball near the net c it was a cinch point for him. By high t lobs and terrific drives, Steeger k Marshall from going to the net and this manner set himself for his fast At first it appeared as the disclosing placements. The match was a tightly1 of a scandal plot, but it seemed un- fought battle in spite of the 6-4, 6,4halls from Dallas- Texas, where high believable. Then the truth was re- score and only by stellar playing did sch°o19 are conducted at night a vealed and it turned out to be four Bud Steeger win the right to mee] aiming ** **- Students attendmg ti r r- i «— t a ■ .Karney in the final match. mght sch°o1 are to recelve h'gh schoc H. J. C. beauties at the recent picnic J . diplomas. The school is open to the being ushered out into the main ™,« uriUUV DF7T public and the ages range from 11 to thoroughfare absolutely devoid of'' & tUNNY, OU I 72, the most frequent age being 19. Many vocations are represented, and 10 times an hour [hc to(al enroilrnerit in aU the Dallas THE EVENING SCHOOL NEWS :ntirely without wearing ■ 157,000,000 times i mtinuously). year. (If it runs evening schools is at present 5564. According to the schools' publicatiot ' system seems to be most successful The official record for high air a™1 very profitable. We found the temperature is held by Death Valley, P**" most interesting, in Southeastern California. The ther- clothing and apparel. Their intentions were good—so they, say, and it seems like they were try-j ing to save dates money by dressing) behind a soda fountain or somethinglj Then soda dispensor of said fountain, immediately ejected the blushing co-l eds who were left high and dry minus- customary dressing garb. | mometer registered 134 degrees there Later the girls put in their appear- at one time, ance and seemed quite unchanged save for the experience gathered, An earthquake once holed a putt for Anyway it was something for them td a mari in Manchester, England. (I brag about at school the next day. \ . . , , , & J prefer to hole my own). At Snyder, Texas, while the ther- I mometer stood at 92 degrees, several compressed air pockets were struck , while drilling for oil. The wells produced air that was well below zero I degrees!
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