Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 8, March 1, 1933
File 003
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 8, March 1, 1933 - File 003. March 1, 1933. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/159/show/157.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1, 1933). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 8, March 1, 1933 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/159/show/157

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 8, March 1, 1933 - File 003, March 1, 1933, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/159/show/157.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 8, March 1, 1933
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 8, March 1, 1933
Contributor
  • Julian, James L.
Date March 1, 1933
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR COUGAR SCIENTIST- did YOU KNOW? The greatest length actually measured is that from the earth to the most distant known nebula, or about 140,- 000,000 light years. Expressed in miles, this equals a figure 9 followed by 20 ciphers. It is exceeded, however, by one estimated length, that of the diameter of the universe, deduced from the Einstein theories, which is about 15 times greater. The smallest known length is the estimated diameter of the nucleus of ; hydrogen atom, set down as a little more than one million billionth of an The extreme of large mass is the estimated mass of the Einstein universe, listed as equivalent, in tons to a figure 7 followed by 72 ciphers. The smallest known mass is that of an electron, of which it is estimated that about 30,000 billion billion billions would be necessary to make an ounce. The longest time is that estimated for the sun to decrease to one-half its present mass, which would be about two hundred billion years. The shortest time is that of one oscillation of a cosmic ray, or about one ten-thousand-billion-billionth of a sec- Known speeds range from that of light, which is approximately 186,000 miles a second, to the speed at which metallic gold diffuses, atom by atom, into solid lead, which is about one twelve-thousandth of an inch per day. The hottest item listed is the temperature of the inside of certain stars, estimated as reaching 72,000,000 degrees Fahrenheit; while the coldest is the theoretical absolute zero of 460 degrees below the Fahrenheit zero. DISHING THE DIRT Bob must have been stalling when he let Ed out-Smartt him. Ethel Falk was the prize to the J. C.'s halls are being graced these days by the beautiful Jean Sham- baugh. Jean hails from Rice Institute where she was a candidate for the beauty section in the Campanile. Lucky for the H. J. C. boys. Wonder why Bill Goggan quit school while buzzing about his bees? Le Roy Melcher says he is true to one girl. He must mean one a! time, for he was seen skating with Helen Gould on McGregor Drive one night, and the next night he was out with a different girl. The third night found the faithful (?) Le Roy with still a third feminine. And to think of all the good vacant space in the And what's more he has been i of late sitting in the Gould mansion taking things easy. Then he rides in Helen's fleet of Cadillacs. The gigolo! Why doesn't Katherine Berry give Charlie Giraud a break? She promises him a break, but she says it will be in his neck. Tish! Tish! Some one asked this scandal monger why Hamp Robinson gave S. M. the air. Our answer is just take a look at little Woozy. She's worth giving anybody the air for. Jessie Darling (J. C.'s only Darling boy) has the same thing that Lord Byron had in such abundance. A big Bowsy Wowsiness. Melvin Feeney was obliging a m< er by warming her baby's bottle for her. He was seen (bottle in hand) by a bunch of J. C. sorority girls who made myth of poor Feeney's plight, But cheer up Melvin! In a few years some of them may be warming milk for a baby (their own). Then you can have the laff on them—only you t laff at girls attending a baby. Million dollars legs may sound kinda Marlein Dietrichish, but at the reception Friday nite we saw something that was just one better. It was Horace (Mountain Lion) Mills in shorts. Mills claims to be H. J. C.'s panther-man, but we can guess (after seeing his legs) why men wear long trousers. St. Patrick's Day already has Donald Aitken in a faint dew; of gentle perspiration, for thence cometh the Sophomore prom. Ask Donald if you're on a committee. "Mr. Allwright," whispers Pat Foley, "who does Ann Owen date at the Friday night, Junior League dances?" "Pat," softly answers J. C-, "why do you eat at Phillips Cafe instead of going four- blocks home to dinner?" Is it because Ann eats there?" Maybe the five-cent sandwiches lure Pat. lis is degenerating into gossip and sewing-circle tales, so lets do it right. Homer Riley was with Pat Foley when Richard MacFee released the exclusive fact that piddler Leroy Melcher "has the most divine crush" on Helen Gould. Now isn't that just swell. Further comment has it that Leroy )sent-mindedly or just clumsily tried to enter through the servants quarters the first time he called on Helen. A manhunt staged for Jimmie Brink - ley's benefit last Friday night was unsuccessful. Pat Foley, J. C. Allwright and Homer Riley chased Jimmie around the campus and finally headed him towards Phillips Cafe. On flying feet Jimmie rounded the corner and seemingly vanished into thin air, for his pursuers could find no trace of him. After three days Jimmie reveal- id that he caught a bus and went home. Safety before comfort is Jimmie's guiding thought. Last Friday was his birthday. Marjorie Wilke and Nell Wade are the cutest model young students around Junior College. Mighty midgets indeed. GOLF AND TENNIS CLUB PLANS TOURNAMENTS Bud Steeger was elected temporary chairman of the Junior College Golf and Tennis Club at their initial meet- isg last week. The J. J. Sweeney Jewelry Company has offered a silver loving cup to the winner of the next tennis tournament which is proposed for the near future. Definite arrangements concerning s golf tournament will be announced later. Those desiring to belong to the club see Coach French, sponsor. WOMEN'S CLUBS— (Continued from Page 1) The tea table was in harmony with the color scheme as it contained flowers and candles of gold and purple. Mrs. Pearl C- Bender and Mrs. J.T. Monroe assisted the hostesses in the dining room. MAKING A MOVIE— (Continued from Page 1) hero drown trying to save the life of his old mother who tried to kilt him?" Yes-men: (In chorus), "Yes, Mr. Schultzenheim er." First executive: "Magnificent!" Second executive: "Stupendous!" Third executive: "Colossal!" Mr. Schultzenheimer: "Mr. Murphy, aside from a few minor changes, I am sure that we shall be able to use your scenerio. You have done excellent work, sir, and I extend you my hearty congra tul ations." (News clipping): John Smith, scenerio writer brought to Hollywood from New York, ran amuck in a conference room of the Epic Studios, and seriously injured Mr. Schultzenheimer, president of the company, and six sub-ordinati Insanity is thought to have been the cause of the attack. Mr. Smith has smiled and laughed constantly since his arrest. MODERN MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES BY EVELYN COFFEY First comes Mildred Learned who commands our admiration. And Mary Stephenson who fits the situation. Next is Wilma Lindsay—a fairer queen In H. J. C. corridors has never been We have our Allen twins, they're so neat, sweet, and trim, And Jessie Darling right behind, who is his interest in? Sissy O'Neale and Kathryn Munger- what do those names mean to you' Smartness in dress and personality plus, can characterize these two. Pat Foley, our mutual friend who just doesn't seem to care. Has decided at last to be roped in because he now combs his hair. Chili Spencer and Richard Long are next in line for praise, We like their hair, we like their eyes, and we even like their ways. Beware, beware, 'tis a red-head coming there, And it's Virginia Cotten who makes 'em all stare. And last but not least as this masterpiece ends, Leroy Melcher and Mac Douglas who're everyone's friends. EXCERPTS FROM DANNY CUPID'S NOTEBOOK Marian Robinson is still being rushed off her feet by the dashing Warren Lemon. Frances Nesmith has fallen head over heels in love again—gentleman unnamed. No matter what you've heard from various chatter-sources, it is not true that Fred Aebi and Wilma Lindsey are frigidifying. ASSORTED SMALL STUFF FOR WHAT IT'S WORTH Fairfax Moody is still clicking merrily and wise-erackerly in and out her classes. Donald Aitken has a placid, gently inquiring expression that makes his face resemble nothing so much than that of a good-natured horse. I certainly could use my April salary. The Pi Beta's caught everything from h— to measels for making their pledges come ot school in shorts Fri day evening. I, personally, think the frat came out on top on account of Mr. Dupre inviting them to become a college activity. If the Pi Beta's accept the invitation they can go to town in a large way. Buddy Steeger called. But it was the wrong number. Ain't it gosh- awful? And when the pesty sheik asked the girlie if his kisses filled her with desire, Nell Wade reports that the girlie said: "Yes! The desire to punch you on the nose." Harold Renfro brings the Garbo out "IF" SOCIETY Down H. J. C.'s way there is a studious group—not much society. But "if" society had its full sway, the students whose names follow this would be leaders(?) Now "if" we had a May Fete, and "if" we had a King and Queen, we'd surely have Hamp Robinson and Woozy Anderson. "If" the fair ladies must be thrilled by the fair saxophone player, then Vernon Scott is in "if' society. "If we had a Social Dictator, we'd have Nora Louise Calhoun—pretty, BY SKIP With Dynamite Billy loved to play, To learn the things it teaches. On Billy's tomb you can read today, The inscription: "Rest in pieces.' Bobby found a pint of rye Beneath the flowing birch. The papers give the who and where, The time, and at what church. Let's climb the fence to the football game, The cops are too fat to budge. won't have trouble, but just the I'm glad my pop's a judge. He saw a sign upon the door That expressed a great deal of feeling. It said, "Please don't spit on the floor,' So he turned and spit on the ceiling. Robert was a baker's son, Around banks he always lingers, But like his father, sad to say, The DOUGH stuck to his fingers. Sing a Hym For Alfred Glick, He lost his wife's Deciding trick. Of all the sad surprises, There's none that can compare, With treading in the darkness On a step that isn't there. A little bear sat on the ice As cold as cold could be, And soon he ups and walks away, "My tale is told," says he. SHORTS AND SPATS Believing all that one hears is not so hot. Mack Douglas heard the wind blowing last week and went outside in his shirt sleeves. How that north wind did laugh. It was a searching wind according to Mack, it found all of him. "Yes," said Fred Aebi, "I'm going to turn over a new leaf and start scribbling again. Upon hearing that Charlie Giraud was looking for her "Shorty" Wilke hid in a locker. Think of the resemblance to canned chicken half baked Frances Jordan says that she will refuse to kiss any of her pupils if she ever teaches a small school. What-a- mistake; what-a-mistake. How about a small college. Being a natural sport, Mr. Rees like: athletics, and comes into the gym to play volleyball. We wish that more of the faculty would join us in play. Last year we had "Windy" Smith, but what is worse, we now have "Tornado" Robinowitz. The meanest men in the world: The men at the end of the registration line that will not O- K. our cards, thus making us start at the end of the line Mr. Birney has ceased to shoot bull but he now kills one heck of a lot of beef. (Editor's note—The following letter as found in a certain H- J- C. student's room, addressed to his folks in Wampus, Texas.) Dear Pop and Mom and Family: Well, something sure did happen to me since the last time I wrote to you, and I get all nervous and shaky every time I think about it. You know that Lucky Strike man says the strong arm of the Federal law reaches everywhere, and this time it almost showed me how big its muscle is. When you sent me my allowance of $1.10 this month, there was a 50-cent piece in the change, so the other day when I started to go to school, I handed it to the bus man. He looked at it and said "Mister, this ain't no good." I thought he was acting funny, you know how those guys are, they think that because they wear a uniform they can act like General Pershing, so I says to him, "If you dont like that one, come over to my house, and I'll see if we can't make you a better one." He says, "you think you are smart, don't you?" and I says, "No, sir, if I was, I would have a job driving a bus." So when we got to town three cops were waiting for me. They took me over to the police station and started asking me questions. They were real nice except for that. Why, the way they would try to catch me made me feel bad all over. On every answer I told them the straight truth, but it even sounded like I was telling a big lie to my own self. If it hadn't been for one of those professors out at school who stuck up for me, they would have put me in the cooler right then. Well, everything turned out all right when they found out that I was ]ust an old country boy and didn't know any better—I never had done anything like that before, so they let me go. But please, Mom, the next time you mail my allowance, please send it all in pennies, so nobody will think that I am trying to get a bus ride and 40 cents change for a hunk of lead with "E Pluribus Unum" on it. Your loving son, MILTON popular, and altogether charming. And "if" our Siamese Twins could be labeled their names would be Ed Smartt and Bob Stallings. "If one reads "Twelfth Night," he is sure to meet Malvalio and "if" one goes to H. J. C. he is sure to meet John Hill. Was it Malvalio or John who became sick of self-love? But as there is no society, I wish to remind you that I said "If," and "if" your feelings are hurt, try to forgive PEN POINTS— (Continued from Page 1) were being made as to an entertainment for the club. One of the members, who is prominent around the school as a sergeant- at-arms got up and with the air of a Webster proclaimed thus: "I make a motion we let this affair be a stag party so we can get better acquainted with each other." Since the club was brand new, and not many of the freshman members were well-known, the suggestion met with instant approval. Then another member spoke up, "Let's have the stag party at my house on the bay." "Got a piano?" somebody asked, foolishly. "Naw," the donor of the house snapped back, "But I've got a victrola and a dozen decks of cards, plenty of beer, and there ain't no neighbors in three miles, so we can raise all the hell we want." At this declaration up jumped Pat. "I withdraw my motion," he shouted. . . . "To heck with stag parties anyway." We have certainly missed the genial presence of Mr. Harris around the school for the past few weeks. . . . Haven't you? , Mr. Harris, it seems, has had two relapses of the flu, and since just one case almost blew us out, we can sympathize with the prof. Prof. O. W. Rote did a fine job of pinch-hitting for the amiable student association sponsor, and we congratulate him. While congratulations are in order, (Continued on Page 4)
File Name uhlib_10270243_v006_n008_003.jpg