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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 8, March 1, 1933
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 8, March 1, 1933 - File 002. March 1, 1933. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/159/show/156.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1, 1933). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 8, March 1, 1933 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/159/show/156

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 8, March 1, 1933 - File 002, March 1, 1933, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/159/show/156.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 8, March 1, 1933
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 8, March 1, 1933
Contributor
  • Julian, James L.
Date March 1, 1933
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR THE COUGAR STAFF Editorial Editor — James Julian Associate Editor — C. W. Skipper Assistant Editor L. P. Marshall Managing Editor - A. Marks Faculty Advisor - F. R. Birney Departmental Exchange Editor Frances Nesmith Humor Editor - Kitty Hurlock News Editors —- John Hill, Jesse Darling Feature Editors - Elmer Hamilton, Mary Esther Waggoner, Milton Gregory Literary Editor Evelyn Coffey Business Business Manager - —- -Minnie Topek Reporters Elizabeth King, Cortis Lawrence, Flossie White, Hope McCutcheon, Tommie Cooksey, Jill Jenkins, Isabel McDaniel, Mrs. Ruby Brittion, Max Cohen, Nell Wade, Bob Stallings, Mary Elizabeth Horan, Ethel Falk, Richard MacFee. THAT SOPH DANCE Among the many things that we have to look forward to, none is more important at the present time than the Sophomore Ball. In the past, H. J. C. has been more or less notorious as a school in which it has been hard to stage a dance and make it a success; not hard to make them successful socially, but hard to make the financial end successful. There is no reason why this school should not be able to support a few dances as do other colleges of its size. We have just as live a student body as other schools, and the fact that we are a night school should not put a restriction on our social affairs. If we are going to attend dances, why not come to the ones sponsored by the school? We can have every bit as good time there as we can elsewhere. The price of bids can be no legitimate objection —depression or no depression. A well-rounded education takes in the social as well as the intellectual side of life, and any live school should not stress either of them to the exclusion of the other. Are we going to come out and support the dance and have a good time and a live school, or are we going to sit back and stagnate? It is up to us! GOOD PROGRAMS The Wednesday evening assembly hour during the present school year has been both interesting and instructive. Chairman M. A. Miller, Dean Dunre, Mrs. Bender and others, are to be congratulated upon the high standard of entertainment so consistently maintained. To have accomplished this was a difficult task, requiring much time and thought; yet no single activity will more quickly place H. J. C. within that ever-widening circle of institutions of higher learning, than a strong, well-functioning assembly committee, presenting fresh, scintillating programs. Most of the student body will regularly attend these affairs without coercion. This was amply proven to everyone's satisfaction last semester. Local school talent has done much to securely cement college loyalty. This talent is not only desirable but also available. Some of the work presented has closely approached the professional, in fact there are at least three radio luminaries, and other talent in the offing, awaiting opportunity for development. WHO'S FUNNY? The well known little utterance which so closely resembles a duck call isi due those would-be comics who are so witty that they are unable to keep their clever remarks to themselves during the assembly periods. Of course, almost everyone realizes that this group is just too funny for words, but at the same time we believe that the student body does not appreciate the true value of this bunch of comedians. Do they not create laughter among their cronies when the program becomes dull? Do they not amuse those about them with their wisecracks? In short, are they not always ready to add spice to the program with their ultra-modern humor? Again we say that these clowns are invaluable assets to our school. But the truth of the matter is that there are two well developed pains in the neck at each assembly, and these so-called humorists are both of them! WERE YOU BORN IN MARCH? (Written in a moment of delirium by an ostracized junky.) March, like all other months, is a very bad month in which to get married. Most people whose birthdays occur in this month were born at a very early age, many of them being nothing more than mere children. March is an exceptionally fine month to make up with a girl, because Christmas is ten months off and Valentine's Day just past. The month of March was named after Mars, a Roman gigolo who was sentenced to a chain gang by Nero because he kissed the Em- MARCH 17 IS SET TO BE DATE OF SOPH ANNUAL BALL Surprising features will distinguish the Sophomore Prom on March 17, St. Patrick's Day, from previous social events of this season, according to Donald Aitken, Sophomore class president. Donald has appointed committees on decorations, advertising and ejections, as well as those semi-permanent committees which choose halls and orchestras. The surprising feature about these appointments is that the exalted personages so honored by committee appointment as yet do not know their prominence. One surprise that Donald expects to be well received is that the admission charge postively will be less than one dollar. St. Patrick's Day so conveniently coming on Friday, the Prom will probably be slightly Irish in nature. Unmentionable brawls and bickerings being foreign to the nature of H. J C. students although strickly Irish, are absolutely impossible, according to college authorities. Pressure is being applied from several sources to bring highly colored plumage at the Prom. Unauthentf cated as yet is the report that boys and not feminine classmates are the pressure appliers. On March 8, one week from today, Donald will unveil the profound depths of his mind and expose several of surprises, including the hall chosen for committee members. A special meeting of the Sophomore Class will be called for that purpose. President THE LOW DOWN CLUB RAMONA OFFERS WELCOME TO H. J. C. STUDENTS W. J. Green, manager of the Club Ramona, invites the students of Junior College to spend an evening of dancing and dining at his club. Ka- mona is the only exclusive night club in Houston. Mart Britt's orchestra is playing a limited engagement at this smart rendezvous for pleasure seekers. A i floor show is booked for every Wednesday and Saturday night. The club is open every night and there is no cover charge. Lewis Reuckert: "Do you pet?' Bernice Blackshire: "Sure, animals." Lewis: "Oke, I'll be the goat." Warren A. Rees, instructor of mathematics in the Houston Junior College, who was recently elected president of (he Texas division of the Mathematical Association of America. —Courtesy Houston Post. REES NAMED TO HEAD TEXAS GROUP OF MATH TEACHES Professor Warren A. Rees, instructor of mathematics at Houston Junior College, was recently elected president of the Texas section of the Mathematical Association of America. Professor Rees, vice president, during the preceding year, heads a group of officers consisting of Dr. B. P- Reinsch, of Southern Methodist University, vice president, and Dr. NatEd- mundson, of the Texas Agriculture and Mechanical College, secretary. "The object of the organization," Rees said, "Is to further mathematical interests, and is related to the improvements in teaching mathematics." A standing committee on education of college math is maintained, with one member meeting with the representatives from the state department of education to make recommendations for the improvement of mathematical curriculum. Hey Le Roy! Just because love is blind, it doesn't mean that every one else is. We refer to the other day when we saw you parked out in Riverside. Shamey on Melcher! Jesse Darling has been seen going places with Vandalia Mae (does she?) Necco. Tut! Tut! A committee for the investigation of the source and nature of phone calls received by Helen Gould should have started work at once. The number of :alls that this fair damsel receive* in a single afternoon is almost beyond Imagination. Find out when she's at home and try calling Hadley 9445. Wonder why Kitty Cat Norman slew Tommy Cat Feeney? Maybe it was to take up with Mountain Lion Mills. Jack Brown will be 23 years old I next month, but he won't tell us what | date the glorious day will fall on. Anne Owen says that we will know when Jack has become famous—then we can read about it in history. Just like George Washington. George cut down the cherry tree. Jack is studying surgery—a regular cut up. Girls when they went out to swim Once dressed like Mother Hubbard; Now they have a different whim; They dress more like her cupboard. There's Lillian Schwartz and Evelyn Cochran listening to Israel Rabinowitz telling his English jokes, and they seem to be enjoying them. Evelyn says he is her honey. Harold Renfro aspires to be a poet. He used to scan meters for the gas company to give him practice. Somebody tell him the difference. And another redskin bit the dust! (Excerpt from a history book.) Who would have ever thought that they had spinach in these days. Ed Smartt: "I have only a minute to spare." Fred Aebi: "Good, tell me all you know." Officer to Mr. Pulaski: (Who is pacing sidewalk at 3 a. m.), "What are you doing here?" Mr. Pulaski: "I forgot my key, officer, and I'm waiting for my son, Edward Joseph, to come home and let IT COULD HAPPEN President Hoover was seated at his desk in the White House. A tall, gaunt stranger walked into the room. The president looked up and glared at the uninvited guest. "Well, what do you want?" "I just dropped in to see how you are getting along. You see, I'm—" "Oh, so you are the landlord. I've been looking for you for four years. The steam radiators in the gold room haven't worked since we moved in, and my, how we have suffered!" "So you have suffered? Say, I used to be in the army, and I nearly froze to death. I didn't even have enough to eat, and—" "I know just how you feel. I am a honorary member of the Salvation Army, and I have to stand in drafts and make speeches. And the food! Say all of the caviar that Coolidgeleft has spoiled. We have nearly starved." fes," said the stranger, "but you don't have men under you ready to mutiny, and have to keep their morale up with promises that you know you can't keep." "Mutinies?" asked the president, "why the whole nation is ready to go on a strike, and those Congressman! I couldn't even get them to pass a bill doubling their salaries, if I was in favor of it." "Yes, but you don't have to stand on a battlefield and dodge shells." "I don't, hey? Say, look at Roosevelt. If he steps outside, the chances are that someone will be waiting with a 16-inch naval gun pointed at the door. And that is Roosevelt, a man who has not even been in office. Look at what I face." "Yes," replied the stranger, "I admit you are in a tough spot, but every time I made a speech, I waited in terror for fear that someone would boo." "Ye Gods," came back the president, "I haven't heard anything but boos for two years. If somebody cheered I would faint." "Yes, but you don't have to cut down trees so that people can make a legend of it," said the stranger. "I don't? Say, I was to chop down tree in Califronia for the opening of press without a doctor's certificate. The Empress begged Mars to plead insanity but he didn't have sense enough to do so. The first day at court Mars renigged, the Empress redoubled, and Nero set fire to the city. Mars was drafted into the volunteer fire department and save three acres of ground for the Emperor. He afterwards claimed that he saved four and a half acres and could have saved the whole city if he had had his fireman's hat. So, Nero named the windiest month in the year after him. a new forest reserve. When I got there, I found that they had selected a giant Redwood tree. If I hadn't thought to use dynamite, I would have been chopping there yet" Well, you don't have to break wild horses so that the historians will have something to write about, and you don't have to throw a silver dollar "No, replied the president, "but I have to throw the bull every time I make a speech, and besides, there is not a dollar in the treasury, so how can I throw one?" "Well," said the stranger, getting weaker, "you don't have people accuse you of causing them to catch pneumonia while they were on a campaign in the army." "No but everybody says that I give them a pain in the neck." The stranger picked up his hat, shook his head sadly, and started to depart. "Wait a minute," the president called to him, "who are you, and where are you going?" "I am George Washington," he replied, "and I am going back to sleep for about a hundred years. This is no place for me now." Charlie Woods: "Ever hear the story of eyes?" Mesta Waggoner: "No." Charlie: "Oh, you have too."
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