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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932 - File 004. May 12, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/149/show/148.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 12, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932 - File 004. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/149/show/148

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932 - File 004, May 12, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/149/show/148.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 12, May 18, 1932
Contributor
  • Marks, A.
Date May 12, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript PAGE FOUR THE COUGAR OUR SPORTING WORLD BY "RIP'' HARRISON Sports Editor of the Cougar STAR FIGHTS j I almost died when I found out I had In what will be the final tournament ] been eating stewed rats, but when I of the semester, Junior College will offer a set of ail star boxing matches to take place in the school gymnasium, Friday, May 20, 9:30 pjn. The previous bouts have been claimed a big success by the large crowds that have attended. But our prediction is that the next crowd will make the others look puny. For fans who like plenty of fast leather-slinging action, next Friday will be their night to shine. Coach French, who has charge of the night's fights has put forth every effort to present the best well-balanced card possible. If plans work out, the fights will be of longer duration with a main go of six rounds. Friday night's card will probably include a wrestling match for the grappling fans. All former contestants who have taken part in the previous fights are being asked to fight in the final tournament, and with such a large choice of huskies there will be several hours of fast exciting boxing. All interested in entering, see French as soon as possible, in order to be weighed and matched with someone your equal. Previous experience the ring is not necessary, for none of the contestants boast any previous fights. SPORT NOTES When Rice Institute eked out tory and tho championship over Texas University last Saturday at the Southwest Conference track meet, we noticed a large crowd of Houston Junior College students among the grand- slanders. These amateur baseball teams that play on Sunday are filled with Junior College lads who someday aspire to be Babe Ruth's. Cy Shaw is a big shot in a nine that plays way out in B. His batting and work on the mound have figured in the "coun- try team's" wins. After much press ballyhoo, Adolph Marks failed to sign up with the unemployed aggregation who boast a well organized team at the- present date. The girls' tennis tournament is still under way and to all appearances the stage is all set for the sudden showing of a dark horse to walk away with high honors. Windy Smith has been getting in some first practice on the courts with '.wo French stars who recently moved to Houston. His fame has improved remarkably, to what he claims to be the new game taught to him by his friends. Instead of playing at a certain court, '.he Pi Betas held their tennis tourna- ■ lent at many different places. With .he semi-finals slated to get started ■on a certain court should be set i the games announced to the r there are several interested ! -. the outcome. LEE AND GERMANY Had long confab with Lee "Whata- rcan" Stone, and his opinion of sea life on a freighter is not as bad as he lets on. Besides the food, work, and sleeping quarters, Lee tells us that life on a ship is as good as can be expected. While in Germany, Hamburg to be exact, Stone narrates an interesting yarn. "As soon as we docked the boat," Stone began, "we left for an eat-joint to stuff grub that was different from the chow they fed us on the 'tub.' I moseyed along the swelegant part of town for a while, and then entered the slum district which had a good odor of cooking food and onions. I entered the nearest door to a likely looking place and after taking a seat on a chair-desk dump, ordered something that sounded like hell but looked like it might mean digestible chow. It was eatable, in fact it was darn good and I would have enjoyed the meal okey, if I hadn't of asked an English looking punk yhat kind of hash it was. He took a close look and smiled in a dopey sort of way and told me that it was stewed rats, onions, spuds, and a weedy kind of grass that the poor people eat. Boy, e-collect my memory, I recollect that it tasted swell." SPORTS It is really something to brag about when one looks over the accomplishments of H. J. C. in the way of conducting more sports and the larger amount of interest taken in the Every afternoon between classes and before there is a crowd assembled on the front campus playing indoor, while on the track and field a group of students are working out in various events and getting in shape for coming meets. Tennis has had a boom at the school and the courts are always filled with several tournaments )W in progress and tennis season is full swing. Boxing has come out in a big way due to the efforts of a number of interested students and the crowds that attended the boxing tournaments. Boxing has probably risen to the front rank quicker and more readily than any other activity. Archery, first started by the girls' gym classes, now has a number of male aspirants who are becoming future Robin Hoods and making the game more popular. Swimming has taken a large step forward. By organizing a swimming team, conducting swimming classes, and giving life saving tests, the aqualine sport enjoys wide support. Volley ball games be tween the teachers as well as thi students has come out lately and has many followers. Even the manly sport of ping pong has its hours. The basketball team went through its most successful year and with a large ber of returning players gives promise to shine forth with a group of well organized teams. Last season there were three teams: varsity, scrub, and girls' varsity. TENNIS TOURNEY The spotlight of the sporting world of J. C. turns on tennis this week as the school tournament gets under way. The first round starts Thursday morning with Bud Steager, Humble singles star, meeting Dick Marshall, Heights luminary, in the first tussle of the tournament. John Hill takes on Karney in what promises to be the feature maich of the day. Bob Branham drew a bye and will meet the of the Hill-Karney set. From the winner of this group the best of the Steager-Marshall combination will challenge for first place honors. The finals are slated to be run off Sat- Class B entrants have not been published yet, and the lists are still open. The winner of the class B bunch will meet the class A champion in an all- star game. NO SPORTS If you are "one of them things" who spend their time thinking of singing "Love You Funny Thing", or reading Dorothy Dix, here pastime which has been successfully used by a pair of H. J. C. studes. started when Jean Wetherall wisecracked to a teacher how smart Hamp Robinson thought he was. Now this made Hamp so mad he sulked and planned revenge. Towards the ■nd of class he slipped the she a note which read: Say, don't get smart, I know 'em by heart, An' I can tell 'em to 'u; You'll have to learn Those remarks to burn, I didn't think it of you. Maybe the she was sorry or maybe the she was joking, anyway, the she soon slips him a note, as follows: Don't be mad, It makes me sad; You make me blue, What'll I do? Now things got started in a big way, SCANDAL SHEET In spite of the insults suffered by this writer because of last issue's "Scandal Sheet," we are back for more. Here goes! Alice C. Luckel, our popeyed female, strolled nonchalantly up to "Gigolo" Robinson and asked him to take her to the Rice Hotel for a big hop. Hamp chumps off and does, and "Popeye" stuck him for a neat wad of cash. Rumors are around that Ruth Depperman got married during the week-end when the college boys invaded Houston for the conference track meet, We heard that he goes to Baylor, but Ruth absolutely denies it. Maybe you do it too but out tightwad friend, Bob Brahnam, goes swimming in the bayou every morning. He denies it, but our scouts add to the misery by discovering that he goes in with a bunch of "cullud chillin." Jean "Slant-eye" Wetherall attendsd a swelegant "one of them things" and as the party progressed she began to long for the back room where the men were mixing drinks. In vain she iught for another femme to explore the bar room. She finally gave up after trying standing on her head in bold effort to get dizzy. The so- called men who were mixing the drinks come under the following heads: Tights: Curtis Dunk, Leroy Melcher, Fred Aebi. Pickled's: Vic Voebel, Marion Adams. Lits; Harold Renfro, Malcolm Pech. Sots: Everyone over to Houston Junior College who wears pants. While in Goose Creek the other day. Windy Smith passed by the drug store, in front of which a cow lay gently reclined in a peaceful cud-chew ing position. Now Windy was thirsty and not seeing anyone around stops the car and sneaks to the posterior anatomy of the cow. He had a small cup and all appearances was going to get himself a glass of fresh milk, but his efforts went to naught when a stenatorian voiced ared out from a doorway. She ain't cow, she's a bull, son." so Hamp hastily scribbles: I thought you my date might be, To go to the famed T. N. T. The bell rings and cuts short any more "pomes", thus Hamp and Jean stroll arm in arm down the hall with the she explaining that she's had a date for some time. So they enter another class and the poems continue to flow. . . . says Hamp: Of girls there used to be many, But now there's not any, but YOU. Poor Jean falls for he line and retaliates: You're always so sweet, I think it's a treat To know you. And the male carries on: I'm willing to take the blame, For anything you do. 'Cause "Love goes on just the same"— And that's how I feel about you. Side-note or Foot-note: (Dear Reader—Please understand that this goes on for several days until it gets lis bad) Says she: Listen to this, my sweet little dear, When I think of you, I'm really sincere. And he gets a dreamy look in his eyes and raves: I can't contain, though I strive in vain, My ardent love For you. And so, dear reader, it has gone on nd on each day it gets worse. Can't someone marry the poor love-stcicken saps? +++ TENNIS TALK The Pi Beta organization concluded the first matches in their inter-club tennis tournament las week, and will get started in the semi final events this week. First among the winners were Windy Smith, Leroy Melcher, \nd John Hill are doped to carry off high honors providing an unheralded siar docs not break loose. Smith won over Jones in two straight sets as did Hill who beat Spitler. Melcher drew a bye and spent his time lining up he best play- HONORUM ROLLUM (Editor's Note—This is a pew type of "Honor Roll" that deals with the peculiarities and oddities of the honored ones. More of a low-down on their weaknesses.) JOHN HILL— Operates a switchboard at Houston Chronicle; spends most of the time phoning girls; "Cabin in the Cotton" and "Minnie" lots; says his prayers every night; sleeps between woolen blankets during the summer; likes females that are different; hu: tunes from II Trovatore; runs around CHARLES BUSE— Who likes to roam around Congress Avenue and look at the pawnshops; sings baritone in the church choir; reads Dorothy Dix every morning; has eakness for brunettes; likes Little Orphan Annie in the comic strips; takes a cold shower before going to bed; rides the street cars for exercise. HAMP ROBINSON— butcher at the Farmers Market; has a long string of women at his id; is the latest in rat dancing; writes silly poetry; can't swim but likes to wade in shallow ditches; has brother who acts as his valet when a party; rides up and down Main on Sunday afternoon; crashes parties; rates all the big functions; used to be a country kid; knows all the latest in men's fashions. HARRY MATTHEWS— Known as dog; originated the "I do not know" and other popular expressions; always wears a rose in his coat lapel :sleeps on the floor when he gets mad; buys the highest priced gas that is sold; chews Brown Mule chewing tobacco; has flat feet; wants to someday own a big hardware store. LEROY MELCHER— Goes semi-steady; owns his own car; started to go to a barber college instead of H. J. C; does cartooning on the side; has a charge account at all leading clothiers in Houston; hasn't learned to dial over the telephone yet; his mother calls him Nudgy; makes his girl use Kiss-proof lipstick. PORTIA GARROT— Has been thrown in the jug on several occasions; does not like to be agreeable; took dancing lessons but teacher gave up in disgust; runs after boys but is not aware of it; likes to see her name in print; has an excuse for everything; cuts paper dolls and plays house with the little girls in her Ighborhood; has a good voice but never sings; enjoys her classes; always seen with her sidekick. EXNA THROGMORTON— Who will not ride in a rumble seat; is dates with men 30 years old; takes delight in standing up her dates; counts sheep in order to go to sleep; reads the telephone book during her spare time; quotes Shakespeare; swallows aspirins;; believes in Santa Claus; likes black dresses; wants to become a hall hostess. MALCOLM PECH— Drinks pluto water; shaves his legs so the hairs will grow longer; don't like soda water; drives reckless and doesn't give a whoop; likes to scare people and does; shaves standing on his head; is leader at a summer camp; never has worn a straw hat and says he never will; wants to be an inventor and has a lot of funny ideas that need inventing; hopes to someday run for Garbage Commissioner. ♦ Ill JMOR* Heroic Couplets The women flock to Jimmie Brinkley— Is it because his hair's so crinkly? Here's to Miss Spiess, her name's Irene, She's often heard of, but seldom seen. A conceited boy is Bobby Branham; In his opinion, "What-a-manum!" Breathe a sigh for Charlie May— At 8 p. m. he hits the hay. This idiosyncrasy is Mrs. Bender's: She simply insists on smashing fenders. A great big rasp for Leon Green. With really nice girls he's seldom seen. Warren Lemmon's the boy over there— He's the answer to a maiden's prayer! (Editor's Note: This probably explains why so many co-eds have completely lost their faith in prayer.) A puzzling problem is Eleanor Busbey— The boys all wonder, "Does she?" Wallace H. Miner gives the shortest tests— Of all we submit to, his are the best. (April Fool!) You've heard of the Renfro boy, Harold Bell, We fear he's headed straight for—well. A single fault has Bessie Ebaugh— She once taught Latin—we'll forgive her though. Miss Vivian Ruth Lesher, known as Pat, Is neither too thin, nor is she too fat. and debonair, Sam Biskin is— Popping his knuckles is a habit of his. Laugh loud and long at Frank L. Mill, He never pays his doctor bill. A canny Scot is Stuart Mackay— He knows how much each penny will buy. Petite Miss Blackshere, Bernice to you, Has time on her hands and nothing to do. The sharpest eyes has Dean Dupre— Nothing goes on that he doesn't see. Miss Betty Covington a journalist would be— Whether she will or not, we'll wait and When the graduates go educational they go with a blare of trumpets. I understand they are to don a know- a-lot expression and teach (?) a class. In fact, they are to run the whole school one night—hmmmm, well ers, and getting set for the semi's. Hamp Robison pulled the big surprise in the first run by defeating Vic Voebel in a close contest. A smashing forehand attack carried Harold B. Renfro through to an easy win over Rip Harrison. Fred Aebi, playing a game, coupled his placements with a good net game to win over Bill Goggan who carried his opponent to the last. Many handsome prizes are in store for the winner and runners-up in this tournament. A large cup with a small statue of a tennis player mounted at the top will go to the winner as first prize, while medals and other awards will be presented to those who place. The girls all fear one Malcolm Pech-- One date with him and they're a A handsome man is Allen Weed— He wears the cutest cap you've ever seed. This cute little lad is Dailey, LeRoy, He's his father's pride and his mother's joy. A practice teacher is Lorene Mc- Kaughan— She paddles the pupils coming and going. Allen Carpenter can't make up his mind Whether blondes or brunettes are just his kind. Georgie Gayle is the sweetest thing, That is—until he tries to sing. A platinum blonde is Louise Morgan- She keeps her word when she makes a bargain. All of the girls seem to have a crush On Mr. Keeler, so he gets the rush. Girls, if you don't know Walter Peterson, Tell his mother you want to meet her son. Allyne Allen admits she's in love, But she won't tell us who's her turtledove. A basketball player is Lauretta Es- Hnger- In fact, she's known as a regular humdinger.
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