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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932 - File 003. May 12, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/149/show/147.

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(May 12, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/149/show/147

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932 - File 003, May 12, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/149/show/147.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 12, May 18, 1932
Contributor
  • Marks, A.
Date May 12, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAB PAGE THREE COUGAR SCIENTISTS Hot Snakes By Quintus Cato Snakes, though cold-blooded and actually below the temperature of the surrounding air most of the time, can warm up appreciably under suitable conditions. This was demonstrated by measurements made on the body temperature of a female African python while she was incubating a "sitting" of eggs. The temperature of the maternal python while she was trying to hatch her eggs was 93 degrees Fahrenheit, not much below the temperatude of warm-blooded animals. The temperature of the surrouding air was only 86 degrees. Normally, the temperature of a snake is not even as high as that of the surrounding air. Turtles have a much higher heat production per unit area of surface than do the snakes, alligators, or lizards. Bears, wood chucks, and ground squirrels, winter - sleeping warm-blooded animals, become colder and colder as they sink deeper into their hibernating state, until their body temperatures may not be any higher than those of a snake, and may drop almost to the freezing point without killing them. Scientists Split Atom Two young British physical searchers in the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University claim to have acheived the goal scientists have sought for years—that of splitting the atom. According to an announcement by Lord Ernest Rutherford, director of the laboratory, they have not only succeeded in splitting the atom, but have transmuted one element into other element—atoms of hydrogen into atoms of helium. The successful splitters of Mr. Atom are Dr. J. D. Crock- roft and E. T. S. Walton. They have been working on the problem for several years, therefore chemistry students do not become discouraged while working that twelfth unknown. Fighting With Fumes While visiting a chemistry laboratory, one notes the different gases in the room such as chlorine, hydrogen sulphide, and others. There was no practical use for these gases outside of the laboratory until they played a part in the World War. Chlorine gas was first introduced by the Germans. Unknowingly, the allies were victims of these poisonous fumes and after these fumes cleared away, the Germans advanced finding dead soldiers in their pathway. Another gas used extensively by the Germans was phosgine. It was composed of carbon monoxide and chlorine. The odor was confused with that of green corn, and the soldiers were poisoned before they detected the gas. To exert themselves under the influence of this gas meant certain During the latter part of the war, mustard gas was also Used by the Germans. This gas flooded the battlefields, staying in the same place for many hours. On account of this property the soldiers wore their masks continuously for many hours. Eventually they had to remove their masks, and they too died from the effect. Mustard gas is composed of hydrogen, sulphur, and chlorine, and is called di-chloro-di-ethyl-chloride, but chemists tire of this long name and call rt mustard gas. The allies were kept very busy protecting themselves against this gas, perfecting gas masks, and manufacturing gases for their use. The Americans manufactured a gas that was not as poisonous as mustard gas; however, it persisted in penetrating the gas mask, and forcing the wearer to remove it thus poisoning him. The delegates from many nations have tried to have the use of posion- ous gases abolished in warfare, but no agreement has been made to that effect since so many delegates are in favor of its use. Synthetic Perfumes In older times the kings thought that they had to have perfumes sprayed over them and their robes in order to be fit to sit on the throne. But to have perfume on them meant that they must first acquire the perfume from some place or anothter. The perfumes that were used were from some foreign country many miles away. If a person were to go to one of the countries, say India, and return with the desires f the king, he should feel happy. He would become wealtny for the king would pay much for the little amount of scented water or desirable odored spices that the traveler had returned with. In ease there were many men who wanted to go to some foreign land to secure these luxuries, a ship would be fitted for that purpose. These voyages made by the men and their ship were very perilous for while at sea a storm may hurl the tiny vessel and its occupants to destruction. The voyages would take many months and even years to make, but upon their return with their cargo, they would become immensely rich by the sale of the perfumes and spices. As the years went by, man experimented in the chemical laboratories trying to discover new things. The coal-tar products were discovered. From the components of the coal-tar synthetic perfumes were manufactured. This discovery made chemists interested. They experimented more until they could make almost any odor that they desired. Upon studying their processes carefully the chemists were able to por- j some synthetic perfumes that produced a stronger odor per unit volume, of perfume ,than the true perfume. Much credit must be given to the German chemists for they are the ones who have done most. The perfumes of Germany have been sent out over the world, for many years, to be sold. Among those nationalities who bought these synthetic perfumes were the French. The perfumes that the Americans buy from the French people are thought to be very good, but . matter of fact the perfumes bought from the French people are ;tly those synthetic perfumes bought from the Germans. The only difference is that the French have used high sounding names while the Germans have not practiced this so much. Synthetic perfumes are steadily replacing the natural perfumes for the manufacturing cost of synthetic perfumes is less than that asked for the true perfumes. Finger Prints! By Exna Throgmorton Dr. Leung, the assistant director of the technical laboratories of the Lyons (France) police department has recently invented a most revolutionary method of reproducing fingerprints direct, without the aid of photography. This new invention does away with the old method in which much of the fine detail in the fingerprint is lost, because, first, the print is transfered to paper, then the paper with the print is photographed; then a photograph is made from the negative. Thus, in each of these steps, some valuable details are lost. With Dr. Leung's invention no detail whatsoever is lost. His invention consists of a mixture which has a base of collodion, amyl, acetate, acetone and ether. This solution is kept in a bottle; it is applied in this fashion: Tbe detective begins by first dusting the object, on which fingerprints are found, with "animal black." Over this is poured some of the mixture which quickly forms a thin film, transparent as glass. This film can be lifted easily off the object on which it is deposited; and on it is found the reproduction of the fingerprint, with every detail perfectly u>~ corded. There is no necessity for making photographs, since the film can be carried about easily. The traces of the fingerprints can be studied from both sides of the film because of the transparent qualities. Dr. Leung's system is to be adopted by every police department in France because of its economy, trustworthiness, and accuracy, and dependability. Charcoal Made by Primitive Method By Grady A. Murdoch While other methods used in the United States mint at Philadelphia have kept pace with progress, the high grade charcoal necessary in making the dies for coining gold and silver money is still burned from selected oak in the most primitive way. The process consists of burning selected oaken logs below a blanket of sand which excludes the air. In this way the logs are allowed to charr slowly. The charred logs are then carefully treated in the pulverizing mill and freed of sand and all foreign matter. Skill is needed to know when the process should stop. Scientific Humor He: Gosh! What makes it so cold in here? She: The electric refrigerator just got struck by lightning. A London chemist has been trying the effect of a new tonic on a moiue. He was more than satisfied, we understand, when the little creature put its tongue out at the cat. Bohunk: What fo' you name yo' baby "Electricity," Mose? Mose: Well, mah name am Mose, and mah wife's .name am Dinah, and if Dinahmose don't make electricity, what does dey make? Onions are said to throw off violet rays. We suspect that the scientist who asserted that, had not smelted any violets. Scientists are wondering about the age of the earth, while an author wonders why it is often referred to as "she". One question should answer the other. According to scientists, the next war will be fought by wireless. What we heard on our set the other night made us think it had started. If you heat iron, it expands; if you heat water, it boils; if you heat water and iron in the same vessel, it's very foolish. Astronomers have reported a new a new star in the constellation "Lizzie I" it has been named "Henry Fordius." Facts and Features A mass of protons, which are the nuclei of atoms, the size of a baseball would be heavy enough to drop through the earth to its center. A mouse's brain is 5 per cent of its body by weight, while a man's brain is but 2 per cent. These intelligent The flame from the tip of an oxy- acetylene torch has a temperature 4,000 degrees higher than the melting point of copper, yet copper tips are always used on the torches, and they never melt! This is explained by the fact that copper is an excellent conductor of heat and dissipates the majority of the heat of the flame to other parts of the torch head. Microscopes show that a mosquito has twenty-two teeth. Are you telling us? Mosquitos do not like the colors yellow and white. A hint to the wise is sufficient! Rayon has been manufactured from waste sugar cane pulp. Pink tinted mirrors are being perfected which give a natural color reflection. What about Rastus? Ordinary pansy seed sells for $540 a pound, while a pound of gold is worth only $330.72. The plane which won the last Schneider Trophy race flew 415 miles per hour. The muzzle velocity of a British revolver is 409 miles per hour! By adding one percent of banana oil to kerosene it can be made odorless and will burn with a bright clear flame. SPEAKERS' CLUB— (Continued from Page 1) tered the business world and had made a success with his little clothing store on Main Street. Doctor Donald Aitken was introduced as the professor of biology at the University of Texas. He related some of his experiences in his field and told how scared he was when he found the missing link in Egypt. Tlis wife, the former Ruth Depperman, was in Egypt with him at the time of his discovery. Ruth liked Egypt so well that she did not decide to return until th? day of the reunion. She caught a dirigible and arrived in Houston just in time for the reunion. Ruth said she little thought when she was going to Junior College that she would some day be the dean of women at the University of Texas. She explained, however, that she liked her work and that it gave her time to attend to her and Donald's two little aiks. Jane Hudgins said she liked her job as a solicitor for Scullins College where she got to travel all the time and met different kinds of people. Evelyne Cochran had been dead for ten years. Harold Colin tried to get in touch with her on his machine, but failed to locate her. Harold Cohn, the toastmaster, said that he went back to Rice another five years and finally emerged an engineer. He also said that he was glad bis former classmates had responded to his invitation to join in the reunion. Florence Kendrick was introduced as a candidate for governor of Texas. She declined to make a campaign speech; instead she told how she helped her friend, Helen Higgins, get her first two divorces. She explained that Helen had her hair dyed green soon after she married her firs thusband He was a little old-fashioned and so he divorced her. Soon after she was married the second time she had her hair dyed pink. Her second husband just could not stand pink, and so he divorced her. The third husband was color blind, but he did not live long. The speaker did not go into details about the remaining three husbands. Miss Kendrick said she was sorry to see Mr. Green so broken in health and recalled the days when Leon was one of Houston Junior College's foremost athletes back in 1932. Florence said she was glad to see Doctor Harris's permanent wave and told how it used to be considered "sissy' 'for a man to have a permanent wave. She recalled the memory of her former classmates to the times Doctor Harris used to tell about men wearing nineteen layers of cloth around then- necks and added that it was refreshing to see him looking so fresh and cool. BISHOP BOAZ— (Continued from page 1) this occasion has not yet been announced. Both of these services are open to the public, and in order to facilitate the attendance of the Junior College students, there will be no classes after 6:00 o'clock on Wednesday night. The list of H. J. C. graduates is as follows: Mrs. Meta Bland, Elizabeth Bastian, Jennie Jo Bentley, Jim Bertrand, Bobby Branham, Bernice Branum, O. D. Brown, Arthur Burns, Eleanor Busbey, Rena Mai Butler, Verna Ruth Compere, Avis Cook, Florine Davis, Elizabeth Dickenson, Elizabeth Ferguson, Christine Fitzgerald, Evelyn Harris, John Heaner, Violet Herbert, Louis Higginbotham, Pauline Katribe, Elizabeth Kerbow, Rosemary Lawrence, Hugo Lueders, Jesus MacCar- dell, Harry D. Matthews, Myrta Ann Meisner, Catheryn Meyers, Louise A bullet has been developed in Germany which has a muzzle velocity of a mile per second! It will not wear the rifles of the gun it is used in, and at fifty feet it will smash through a half inch of compound chrome-nickel armor. It is to be used fighting army tanks. Dr. Vannevar Bush of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has invented an electric machine which will perform complex differential equations in calculus. It will solve in few minutes, equations which usually take weeks of hard work to compute. (Now there is an excuse for calculus to be omitted from college Airplane propellers are being made from cotton! And that's not all; they are even making roads from cotton fibre! A barber in Portland, Oregon, subjects his customers to 200,000 volts of electricity when they come to him for a haircut. The voltage makes tbe hair stand on end and it is much easier to cut. High frequency is used. If the thickness of a postage stamp be let to represent the record of human history, then the Empire State building would not be high enough to represent the rest of astronomical time! Dropping dry ice (solid carbon-dioxide) on clouds by means of an airplane, will cause rainfall. Slightly wilted flowers can be revived by dropping an aspirin tablet into the water they are in. Dead flowers will not respond to this treat- THIS AND THAT (Science News Letter) ~~" Viewing motion pictures causes less eye strain than reading a book for a similar length of time, says an officer of the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness. There are about 2,000 blends of tea. Veneered furniture can be traced back to ancient Egypt, when it was made for kings. Fish lie with their heads towards the current, and therefore fishing upstream is apt to be most effective. The oldest known attempt at keeping weather records in this country was made in 1644 by a minister in New Sweden, near the present city of Wilmington, Delaware. London now has an official who decides how much air should be admitted to street cars, and the windows are locked in that position for the day. There are 32,000,000 persons in the United States who drive automobiles, of which number 22,000,000 have taken no test of driving ability. An English professor has chosen 850 words of "basic English" which provide a vocabulary adequate for ordinary communication, to be used aj an auxiliary world language and also for the use of foreigners who find English bewildering. Peanut shells as a source of artificial silk are being investigated by the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Cotton canvas as a substitute for stucco for the upper stories of houses can be used if it is protected by three coats of paint. A rivetless ferryboat, constructed mtirely by welding, has been completed. ♦ + + Melbadel W. has adopted the 223 journalism class. If you don't believe it just make a social call around 7:30 o'clock some night. We haven't decided what the attraction is—but she brought a Flit gun to class, and exercised a healthy squirt or so around the room so I suppose the great ambition is to be a fireman. Morgan, James Page, Justine Shapley, Tom Studdert, Anna Sloane, Milford Smith, Victor Voebel, Mrs. Lavada Harris Wood, and Lola D. Sullivan.
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