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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932 - File 002. May 12, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/149/show/146.

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(May 12, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/149/show/146

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932 - File 002, May 12, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/149/show/146.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 12, May 18, 1932
Contributor
  • Marks, A.
Date May 12, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE CODGAR THE COUGAR Of The Houston Junior College Houston, Texas Established 1928 Published semi-monthly during the college year. Subscriptions, $1 par year. Single copies, 10 cents. EDITORIAL STAFF Managing Editor ...A. Marks Assistant Editor _.. James Julian Faculty Advisor _ F. R. Birney DEPARTMENT HEADS Sport Editor _V. F. Harrison News Editors- -..Betty Covington Florence Kendrick Feature Editor . L. Ray Pell Literary Editor A. Gordon Jones Humor Editor _...._.Ruth Depperman Exchange Editor Wenonah Phelps REPORTERS James Page, Cy Shaw, Herman Lewis, Anna Sloan, Louis Higginbotham, and E. O. Boulet A NAME MANIA BY LOUIS HIGGINBOTIIAM THURSDAY'S THE DAY! Plenty of EATS! Plenty of FUN! That is about as accurate a forecast as we can give for the forthcoming picnic and field day to be held at Sylvan Beach Park next Thursday. But that is enough to convey the idea that everybody who attends will thoroughly enjoy himself. Tradition is the essence of school life, and as Robert Littell would say, "One of the traditions of the Houston Junior College is that all of the students hold a big annual outing at the close of the school year—the first of these will be Thursday." From time to time throughout the year there have been vague suggestions that we "ought to have a Junior College Day", "maybe go on a picnic", "put some life into things", and so on ad infinitum. But nobody took the trouble to do anything about it except to spill a tremendous volume of the well-known super-heated atmosphere. Some even said that, "it won't go over, you can't put on an affair like that at Junior College." Well WE CAN!! And what is more, WE ARE GOING TO!!! Cy Shaw was one of those who believed that we should have such an event, and in the face of remarks such as the foregoing, he has worked out the necessary details and secured the consent of the powers that be, provided there is enough interest on part of the students. Cy has worked on this idea and has devoted a lot of time to it; he has received the fullest co-operation from Dr. Oberholtzer, Mr. Dupre, and Mrs. Bender; it now rests with us, you and me, to put this over. There is absolutely no reason why we should not make Thursday a banner day in the history of this institution. Smaller groups have had several similar events, ond now is the time for all of us to get together and make the First Annual Junior Coliege Picnic and Field Day the biggest thing of its kind that ever happened. Committees have worked out the necessary plans to care for food, transportation, and the program. The price has been kept well within reason, and transportation will be provided where necessary. Anyone should find something on the program that will appeal to him. There will be volley ball games, baseball games, races of various types, boxing, swimming, and dancing (to say absolutely nothing of the fact that there will be a full moon that night). Certainly everyone will have a good time. Now shake off that seasonal attack of spring fever and come on down. See YOU at Sylvan Thursday! Victor Voebel seems to be busy as a Bee and as absent-minded (?) as a professor; well, well, not everybody can be class president and the job isn't all honorary—it requires an energetic somebody who goes places and sees things and does 'em in a big way. O. K., Voebel. One SUMMERS evening Jerome Fitzroy Stockaberry went out for bis DAILEY walk. He told the BUTLER that he would be home EARLY. To the COOK he said, "Don't forget to make COFFEE for dinner." A STRONG GAYLE was blowing. He walked in his SCHERTZ sleeves and what a KUHLMAN he was! He was a good WALKER. He went down WEBSTER to CRAWFORD, and a BLOCK down that STREET past a WHITE CHURCH and met the SEXTON whom he say WANDER out after ringing the BELL. "What funny bumps you have on your face," he said to the SEXTON. "SCHWARTZ," was the BLAND reply. "You must have a PECK of them. I'll be they are a PAYNE." "Stop, you BLANK! You can't be- LTTTLE me like that! I'll SLAUGHTER you. But first I'll ROB you." "Oh, don't do that! COMHAIRE to the EDGE of this PARK. Let's sit under this ASHE tree and talk it over." "ALLWRIGHT, but for you it'll be SCHOONOVER." "Please, have a HARTT!" "No, I PLEDGE! This b the last PAGE of your life!" "How TRUITT seems! ALSUP with "Yes, you COWART!" "Don't call me that! "I'll SLAY you with a STONE." Jerome wasn't a QUITTER, so he did SLAY him. But the LAWS began to HUNT him. He went into a JETER id had to FLY. Suddenly he saw the LACY WHITE clouds BOLE up BLACK over the BALDRIDGE of the HILL, and he knew that a WTLDE and WOOLEY STORM was coining. "NOBLE," he said, "now I can escape! I don't give a FLICK about the LAWS now!" He ran PELL-mell through the RAINEY weather until he came to old BROWN HOUSE. He asked the lady who answered the door for help; she talked it over with her son, ANDERSON said: 'Come INMAN. EUBANK on us. We'll HYDE you in the GARRETT." And no sooner SEDDON done. 'You must be hungry," the lady said. "Sit here in the HALL, and I'll FRY you an EGG. Eat your FILSON, then go upstairs and COYLE up on that PYLE of GOTTEN in the GARRETT and go ti> sleep. Take your hat with you, so you won't leave any MARKS behind you. And be sure to LOCKE tbe door!" led MOORE and MOORE. The roof begai to LIECK. He took cold. 'KERBOW!" he sneezed. Then he started to HAACKE until he was GREEN in the GILLS. "KAUFMAN, cough!" the old lady said, "it'll do you )0d!. Try VICK*S salve, too." 'Tve a notion to turn myself in," Jerome r-id a week later. "I can make BOND, no JURY would convice and I will be a FREEMAN again. I'd like to go BOLLTNG." "Wouldn't do you any good!" the _..n said. "You couldn't get out of here unless you were a BIRD and had WEBB-feet I can't even get out to buy 'All we've got in the house is one LEMMON, a box of GRAHAM cracfc- with a broken SEALE, some CARRAWAY seeds, a box of KELLOGG'S Corn FLAKEs and some blackberry pie. And I can't STANBERRY pie! There were some chickens roosting the window-sill, and I tried to catch them, but the COCHRAN and the hens followed and they all drown- My HARRIS turning grey from worry, I GRANT you!" "With the water so high, we should atch some SALMON. We can use ome FINEGOLD hairpins for HOOKS . . but we han't any BATES. We could gig them; I'm a good HOOKER but we haven't a STEELE SPEAR. We gotta MARSHALL our forces LESHER want to starve. We'll soon be in the MORGAN worse. "But what MORRIS to be done?" "If we had a boat we could SLIDER down to the water and ROWE opt. I'm afraid to swim because of SHARKES" "And this rain will ruin everything. If the fire BURNS in the STOVALL the time maybe that will help." But they didn't have any WOOD so PRESIDENT To Victor Voebel goes most of the credit for the success of the Fifth Annual Senior reception held May 6 in the college gymnasium. Vic is president of the graduating class. —Courtesy Houston Post EXCHANGES Heading our list of exchanges this week is the PEGASUS, a semi-annual edited by the students of University High School at Ann Arbor, Michigan. This is a literary booklet containing stories and poetry written by both the junior and senior divisions of the school. There are really some excellent articles in it, and we certainly enjoyed reading it. —H.J.C.— From Moberly Junior College in Missouri comes the MIRROR. This school certainly has the right idea about studying; in fact, they seem to share our sentiments exactly. How's this?— "Don't study when you're tired or have something else to do. Don't study when you're happy, for that would make you blue. Don't study in the morning, and don't study at night, But study at the other times with all your main and might." —H.J.C.— From Prairie View State Normal and Industrial College at Prairie View, Texas, comes the PRAIRIE VIEW STANDARD. We want to congratulate this institution on its excellent publication which we found both interesting and instructive. It consists mainly of school accomplishments and articles of general interest. The Normal is a Negro institution. —H.J.C.— Traveler: How much do you charge for a room? Clerk: Five dollars up! Traveler: But I'm a student. Clerk: Then, it's five dollars down. —WESTERN BREEZE, Cincinnati. —H.J.C.— Do we like the J-TAC from John Tarleton Junior College? Just ask us. Who wouldn't like a paper that publishes an article like the following one. (Just what we've been trying to convince our parents of for the past ten years.) " 'Viewing motion pictures causes less eyestrain than reading a book for a similar length of time,' says an officer of the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness." they got the laundry basket and let the WASHBURN. "We're all a bunch of ZAPPS," said Jerome. "Let me think WUNCHE— or maybe twice—and I'll ge us out of here SAFEY WRIGHT quick!" But at that moment he awoke from his dream in the BUTTERY of the dairy where he was a WORKMAN. "SWEITZER! WATSON my mind to make me dream such dreams?" he asked as he reached for another doughnut to DUNK in sour cream. TALK OF THE TOWN — Music undoubtedly hath charms, because every time Prof. F. R. Birney requests Gladys Jacobs and Violet Herbert to sit as far from each other as possible they go into their duet, "We'll be back together again;" and sure enough, they have to be separated again at the next meeting of the class. The duet has practically been augmented into a trio; Melbadel Wright now joins in on the chorus. Melbadel, by the way, has eliminated all doubt as to who is the most versatile girl in H. J. C. Her fame as an actress has spread to all parts of the city, and now she comes forth as a directress. At tennis, she Tildens 'em all, and as a dancing partner she seems to have a monopoly on all the boys. She is almost on a par with Ruth Depperman when it comes to getting the young men to wait on her. But all of those are only sidelines; her specialty of specialties, the thing she will probably make her life work, is operating a Flit gun. That quiet natured, good looking blonde who has been attending H.J.C. since September, but hasn't disturbed anybody yet (except when she smiles at you) is Alma A. Stewart. She really has quite a good reason for being quiet around here. Alma has a young- sister, however, who does like publicity; Elllen (that's the sister's name) was once told by one of her admirers that there was something about her that drove him crazy. She calmly replied, "Well, that remains to be seen." Leroy Dailey, basketball coach, swimming instructor, life saver, physics demon, etc., has added one more source of pride to an already impressive list; he had his signature weighed at the recent Rice Institute Engineering Show (Adv.). If our memory is reliable in such matters, the result was the neighborhood of twelve-one millionths of a pound. Congratz, Leroy. One more landmark has disappeared; another tradition has been removed; another of H. J. C.'s distinctions is no :; the inseparable have parted, fn other words, Roland Hall has given up his pipe; he says it was too potent for Such a calamity is indeed tragic just at this time; just think what a great help that pipe would be in combatting the invading hords of mosquitoes There is some consolation In the alization that the Hon. J. Granville Pope still retains his special fumigator, but Pope is only a part time student and is, therefore, at a disadvantage. The pests do their worst work during Leslie Martin, Harry Echols, and George H. Snider are trying to take up a collection to help Hugo Lueders get his shirts out of hock. When Lueders came to school Friday wearing only his winter undershirt with the sleeves cut short (Oh, no! Not that at all. I mean he had no other shirt on) the three kind-hearted boys immediately hit upon this plan of helping their less fortunate brother. Contributions may be sent to either of the three or to this writer (Adv.). Latest report of scout No. 6%: Artful Art" Burns tried to bribe R. Louis Higginbotham to write him up big in this issue of The Cougar. . . Curtis Dunk, he basso from out Heights way ,said he thought Lula Grace Kel- jgg, the shoeless wonder, had died her air another color. Kellogg came ight back with "Fooled you that time; there aren't any more colors." Puzzle: Who won? . . . Ben M. Fly, Jumbo (no adv.), eating champ of this institution, has a decided weakness for blondes. Other requirements, big car and lotsa dough. ... Pat Foley, who calls the Heights boys "teahounds," did not accept the invitation he received to be flower girl in the San Jac. May Fete. . . . Roger Bell and Louis Ded- man do NOT wear the same pair of dainty blue knickers on alternate days r.s reported. Incredible as it set there are two distinct pairs. . . . Verna German still continues to look down on anybody less than six feet tall. iLl^llay <Rell Hundreds of H. J. C. students will journey to Sylvan Beach Thursday to initiate the first annual field day for Houston Junior College. School officials have put forth much effort in obtaining this day for college play, and have co-operated with * the students to the utmost in planning each detail of the outing. This Students' Day, we believe, is ' one of Cy Shaw's original ideas. Shaw, president of the student body, has worked tirelessly in an effort to make the party a huge success. Shaw stated that Friday was the first choice in the selection of a date ' for the picnic but since many difficulties were encountered with plans for this date, Thursday was chosen ' instead. A big attendance will undoubtedly mean a permanent Field Day on H. J. C. sport calendar. LOU LURIE, ICE CREAM KING - Lou Lurie, well known college boxer, seldom keeps a promise. The "battler" works for an ice cream wholesale house when not in school, and conse- " quently has an unusual supply of friends. But Lou should keep books on his promises. Several times the popular fighter has promised this writer a pint of cream but in each instance he failed to appear with the banana-nut flavored • ice cream. e now find that there have been others who have stood patiently on e dark corner awaiting the genial Lou. So, beware of Lou Lurie! He demands that you first do him a big flavor, then promises the cream and . then you TRY to get ti. This Gordon Jones is quite studious. Besides being a public speaker of " merit, Jones is never caught napping by a prof. What a relief when he is called upon to discuss some phase of a tedious as- ignment. When he finishes, the professor never has an opportunity to say, "What else, John?" Are you a racqueteer? Some people ire, honest. A whole bunch of 'em are. We are going to have a racquet- . eering tournament and before long, says Mr. French. I'm not kddnig you a bit; there have been some excellent tennis players excavated from among the student body—and a tournament is in the making, so come on you , racqueteers of the ole alma mater and give your support to the glory that will be. Good Advice Forget each kindness that you do as. soon as you have done it ; Forget the praise that falls to you the moment you have won it; Forget the slander that you hear be- * fore you can repeat it; Forget each slight, each spite, each sneer, wherever you may meet it; Remember every kindness done to you what'er its measure; • Remember praise by others won and pass it on with pleasure; Remember every promise made and B keep it to the letter; Remember those who lend you aid and be a grateful debtor; Remember all the kindness that comes , your way in living; Forget each worry and distress, be hopeful and forgiving; Remember God, remember truth, re-# member heavens above you; And you will find through age and youth, that many hearts will love | you. —MILFORD M. SMITH.
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