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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932 - File 001. May 12, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 11, 2018. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/149/show/145.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 12, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/149/show/145

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932 - File 001, May 12, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 11, 2018, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/149/show/145.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 12, May 18, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 12, May 18, 1932
Contributor
  • Marks, A.
Date May 12, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE COUGAR PUBLISHED BY THE JOURNALISM STUDENTS OF THE HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE HOUSTON, TEXAS. WEDNESDAY, MAY 18, 1932 FIRST ANNUAL PICNIC THURSDAY "JUNIOR college • BOYS ENTERTAIN RADIO LISTENERS • The popular Junior College quartet entertained fans of the radio audience from Station KPRC at 10 p.m. May 15 •with a snappy program. The selections rendered were "A Familiar Plantation Medley," "Somebody Loves You," "Massa Dear," and "Chinese Honeymoon." Alfred Butler, Douglas Raub, O. D. - Brown, and Curtis Dunk compose the quartet, which is accompanied by Miss- Blanche Butler. • Aside from being popular with the student body these songtsers are giving the Junior College much publicity and they have received many requests to appear in assembly again. .1 Tribute To Cy Shaw "Flowers for the living" is one of the slogans of the Cougar. We're presenting these flowers to Cy Shaw. "Nothing but a lot of hot air," is the opinion Cy has of himself, and he thinks that most of the students in the Houston Junior college have tbe same idea. But that is not true. Cy is the pillar upon which the students of the college have to lean when there is some vital question in which they are interested. With Cy they will always get a fair and square deal; he is one fellow whom they are certain that they can depend upon for results. We're with Mm. SCHEDULE OF FINAL . EXAMS GIVEN OUT BY DEAN DUPRE Graduates will be given examinations one week earlier than the other —srudenxs, according to Assistant Dean . K. Dupre. "The new system has several advantages," Mr. Dupre said, "it gives us a "chance to get the grades arranged in the office, and it gives the students a chance to make preparations to go to summer school if they so desire." Final examinations for seniors will begin May 23 and examinations for other students will begin May 30. ♦ + + Schedule for Examinations For Graduates Monday, May 23—All Monday, Wednesday and Friday classes meeting 6-7, Room 202, Mr. Kierbow, and 8:30-9:30 Room 205, Mr. Miner. Tuesday, May 24—All Tuesday and 'Thursday classes meeting 4-5:30, Room 317, Mr. Kerbow. Wednesday, May 25 — All Monday, , Wednesday, and Friday clesses meeting 3-6, Room 308, Mrs. Ebaugh, and 7:30-8:30, Room 312, Mrs. Soule. Thursday, May 26—All Tuesday and Thursday classes meeting 5:30-7, Room 202, Miss Thomason, and 7:15-10:15, u Room 202, Mr. Ledlow. Friday, May 27—All Monday, Wednesday, and Friday classes meeting 4-5, Room 207B, Mr. Miller. + + + Schedule For Those Not Graduating ■ Friday, May 27—AH 8:30-9:30 classes meeting Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Monday, May 30—All 6-7 and 7:30- *8:30 classes Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Tuesday, May 31 — All 4-5:30 and 5:30-7 classes meeting Tuesday and Thursday. Wednesday, June 1—AH 4-5 and 5-6 classes meeting Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. . Thursday, June 2—All 5:30-7 classes meeting Tuesday and Thursday. "If an S an I an O an U • With an X at the end spell Su; And an E and a Y and E spell I, Pray what is the speller to do? Then if also an S and an I and a G * And an HED spell Side, There's nothing much for the speller to do But go commit Siouxeyesighed. Last Minute Change Of Date Made By Committee Students Will Leave Union Station in Body at Noon for Sylvan Beach Thursday, May 19, 1932, will be the biggest day in the history of the Houston Junior college if plans now in effect work out successfully, for on this day, the first annual picnic of the student body of the college will take place at Sylvan beach. Elaborate preparations have been made, committees have been appointed, and the hearty co-operation of the faculty has been pledged the enterprise by President E. E. Oberholtzer. All that is now needed, according to Cy Shaw, president of the Student's association, is the co-operation of the student body, and according to the show of hands in the call meeting Friday night, that is forth- corning tomorrow when the picnic takes place. In order to more easily carry out GIRL GYM CLASSES BREAKFAST AT PARK The two gym classes of Bernice Blackshere gathered at Herman Park Sunday morning for a sunrise breakfast. Everyone had arrived by six clock and after repeated yawns, a baseball game was started. The star player of the morning was Lillian Schwartz, who certainly slung a mean bat. Some cf the girls played tennis; others robbed the cradle of its few pleasures and amused themselves with swinging, see-sawing, and sliding. A target was set up and the woods were filled with little Pocahuntas'; lucky for Robin Hood he was not there for he would have certainly been outclassed by Margaret Winfrey. Arrows began to whiz hither and thither; mostly thither as three birds, two squirrels, and ten minnows were killed. The sharp shooter of the morning was announced to be Eleanor Busbeywhen she played he part of Mr. Tell and halved an orange on Gladys Jacob's head (too bad the arrow didn't hit a little lower). By that time everyone was beginning to feel a rather keen appetite. Plans were made for the preparation of breakfast; each drew a piece of paper from a frying pan. On it was written a short command- gather wood, fry bacon, etc. Soon everyone was busy performing their task. Melbadel Wright, the girl scout, herself, rapidly built a roaring fire and presently the aroma of bacon and coffee filled the crisp morning sir. With Laverne Lathrop as chief chef, breakfast was ready in a few minutes and with Evelyn Cochran acting hasher ,it was served and ravishingly consumed. Everything went along nicely until the bugle over at the zoo sounded, calling the monkeys to breakfast; the strength of the entire group was required to hold Eleanor back. After wading in the bayou and playing with the fishes, everyone went home with many happy memories of the morning. BISHOP BOAZ TO ADDRESS SENIORS Bishop H. A. Boaz has been selected to deliver the baccalaureate sermon to the graduates of the Houston Junior College and the five senior high schools Sunday, May 29. The service will be held at the Buffalo stadium at 8:15 pm., with the six graduating classes attending in distinctive caps and gowns. Commencement exercises will held at the same place on Wednesday, June 1, at 8:15 pjn. The speaker for (Continued on Page 3) speakers: club in unique meeting 15 yearIFhence visioned Fifteen years from now was the idea carried out by the Speakers' Club in their program of after-dinner speeches, Thursday, May 12. The toastmaster, Harold Conn, president of the club in 1932, introduced each of the famous men and women who had found time to return to Houston and join the reunion of their former classmates. Doctor Harris had recently been elected president of Houston University. He spoke of his son's playing on the college football team in welcoming his former students to the reunion. Dr. Tremont was the next speaker to be introduced. He told how he came to be such an eminent surgeon and added that he practiced on human beings instead of animals. Pat McAIexander told how he was hindered by the depression after he graduated from college and was finally bequeathed a large estate in South America by a rich uncle. He said he was at present engaged in nut-growing in Brazil. Elizabeth Ferguson said that she was still an old-maid school teacher and added that everyone recognized her as being one. Evelyne Hurvitz admitted that she had gained some success in her work as a concert pianist. Another speaker said he was proud to have gone to school with so famous a person as Miss Hurvitz. Leon Green bragged about the 110- story building that he had just finished. He said he owed his success as a building contractor to the advice of Doctor Harris. Green's health had broken during the 15 years and he was hardly able to stand to deliver his after-dinner talk. Frances Nesmth said she also owed her success as he assistant editor of the American Magazine to the excellent advice of Doctor Harris. Arthur Burns had become a noted lawyer and was proud of his weighing 200 pounds. Helen Higgins was married to her sixth husband, Goodrich, the golden- rod rubber king. She related the interesting story of how her husband had developed Edison's experiments with goldenrods and had become a millionaire. She regretted not being able to bring her children but promised to bring them to the next reunion. Julian Hurwitz told how he had en- (Continued on Page 3) AFTER-DINNER TALKS MADE BY MEMBERS OF CLUB AT GATHERING After-dinner speeches were featured by the Platform Club Friday evening. The dinner was omitted but several members furnished their own "after- dinner mints and candies." The meeting was represented as being 15 years hence and each member explained what he expected to be at that time. representation included quite a bit of territory; among others, ex-convicts, bootleggers, presidential candidate, world golf champion .district attorney, doctors, dentists, and county auditor. President Jimmie Brinkley served as toastmaster and Harvey W. Harris was first speaker for the James V. Allred Delivers Talk to Student Assembly Attorney General James G. Allred, in his speech on "The Present Depression," delivered before the student assembly of Houston Junior College on May 11, made the following statement: "I am one of those who believe that there is more hope and success in the future." He believes that great good shall come to the world from this present depression. The background for-it is in the American homes. The maximums of Poor Richard have been forgotten along with the forgotten lessons of the past. "Prosperity destroys the lives of people and indulgences are the cause of people going to hell," stated Allred. These days are times of great trial and tribulation and may be regarded as testing times to prove to us what metal we are made of. Many people are of the opinion that the present generation of young people are on the downward road, but Allred) thoroughly believes in their ability to carry on in the destinies of this country. His advice to young people is to try things that have never been done before, to upset the 'old dope bucket.' Outstanding achievements that attract the public's attention are successes of people whom we do not expect it of. According to Allred, the giant strides of progress in the past will be only fractions of steps in the future. "The skyscrapers of today are but the doll houses of tomorrow," stated All- red in conclusion. An Englishman was visiting this country for the first time, and as he we driving along the highway saw a sign, "Drive Slow. This Means YOU!" The Englishman stopped in surprise; "My word! How did they know I was here?" —AEGIS, Houston. the plans of the picnic, Shaw has, with the sanction of Dean Dupre, appointed the following committees: Executive committee: Mr. Dupre, Mr. Harris, Mrs. Bender, Mr. French, Cy Shaw; transportation committee: Donald Aitken, O. D. Brown, Mac Douglass, Mr. Hooker, advisor; food committee: Rena Mai Butler, Nora Louise Calhoun, Eugenia Stevenson, Mrs. Ebaugh, advisor; activity committee: James Julian, A. Marks, Leroy Dailey, Walter Scarborough, Irene Spiess, Bernice Blackshere, Bob Branham, Gordon Taylor, Paul Gilder, Coach French, advisor; serving committee: Christene Fitzgerald, Lorene McKaughan, Lillian Schwartz, Evelyn Cochrane, Pat Foley, Curtis Dunk, Gordon Jones, Miss Thomason, advisor; after-dinner program committee: Jimmie Brinkley, Evelyn Bashara, Mrs. Jewell Mitchell, Mr. Harris, advisor. Plans already formulated call for a meeting of all those going at the Union Station, corner Crawford and Texas, at 12 noon, tomorrow, Thursday, May 19. From this central point, the picnickers will start to Sylvan Beach where an extensive program of racing, jumping, baseball playing, swimming, dancing, and eating awaits them. After the evening meal more entertainment will be given, with the students filing their long ways home late Thursday night, or early Friday morning. To Cy Shaw goes most of the credit for planning this picnic and contributing to its success. Working day and night toward bettering the spirit of the student body of the college, Cy has hit upon the idea of an annual picnic and has nursed the idea from its infancy to its maturity with the loving, care of a proud father. All possible means have been taken to assure all that attend a rip-roaring good time, and nq stone has been left unturned in this pursuit of enjoyment. NAVY DIRIGIBLE IS SIGHTED OVER CITY The U. S. Navy dirigible, ZRS14, christened the U. S. S. Akron, was seen coming over the heart of the city of Houston at 3:55 p.m. Monday. First signs of the giant aircraft were seen in the east end of the city at 3:30. Moving slowly and almost silently, the huge craft swept slowly over the heart of Houston in the full view of hundreds of thousands of Houson's population which crowded on roof tops, streets, windows, yards and all open spaces available and around Houston. The courtesy of the dirigible's crew for the curious crowds was manifested in the slow speed it made over Houston, so the crowds might obtain a good clear view of the huge craft. Only two of the eight giant motors were turning their propellers at a reduced rata.
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