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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 8, February 27, 1931
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 8, February 27, 1931 - File 002. February 27, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/144/show/141.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 27, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 8, February 27, 1931 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/144/show/141

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 8, February 27, 1931 - File 002, February 27, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/144/show/141.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 8, February 27, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 8, February 27, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date February 27, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript The Cougar Of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas Established 1928 Published semi-monthly during the college year. Subscription, $1.00 per year. Single copies, 10 cents. EDITORIAL BOARD Editor-in-Chiei Everett Kendall Assistant Editor Walter Garrett Assistant Editor.. E. Houston Faculty Advisor F. R. Birney Department Editors Society Maurine Edminster Sports—Men. George Hughes Sports—Women. Maurine Keach Humor Jane Witherspoon Activity Frances Baty Exchange Rubye Tunnel! Feature .Ethel Mercer Reporters Chapell Freeman Pauline Ault Beatrice Hamilton Lois Harrison Montford Inman A. C.Irwin Fay Laurence Ethel Mercer Rubye Tunnell Llewellyn Ross Prances Baty Opal Beane Lucille Cafcalas Evelyn Cochran Welton Cohen Gordon Davis Ruth Dermody Lois Duff The Woodul Bill The only surprising part of the Junior College bill which Senator Woodul introduced in the Senate last Friday is its not having been introduced be- Senator Woodul is to be applauded for seeing a real problem, a logical remedy, and for his diligence in the whole matter. For it is obvious that some political body should come to the financial assistance of a student body that works in the daytime, earns enough money to support itself and the institution, and attends classes at night. Not only would a reduction in tuition in this manner greatly relieve the 750 students now in the college but it would stimulate a healthy growth of the college. And whether this bill is accepted or no* the school should feel the greatest degree of gratitude for the interest shown by Senator Woodul. A brief survey of comparison will also reveal that no more capable and energetic directing board can be boasted of by any college than that of the Houston Independent School District. Indeed both from the standpoint of finances and of executive leadership the passage of this bill will greatly benefit the college. H. J. C. Standard Sincere students at H. J. C. are gratified by the effort that is being made this semester to enforce all regulations regarding class cutting, making up missed work, being late to classes and attendance at assembly. It is a present day demand that there be a 100 per cent return in value for every dollar spent. Students at H. J. C. are spending valuable time as well > as their tuition in securing an education, and they have a right to full value for this expenditure. The enforcement movement is an effort to see that the students do get full value. It will also raise the already high standard of the school. The school heads are to be congratulated on this effort, and they should receive the hearty support of every student. Our college is what we mak-i it. If we don't like it, whom should we kick first? The Cougar is pleased to see many new faces in the hails this semester. Welcome to good old H. J. C. HONORARY SOCIETY TO MEET The next meeting of the Honorary Society will be held Friday, February 27, at 9:15 p.m. in Miss Bender's inner Suggestions wilt be submitted at this meeting for the name of the club and other important maters will be discussed. The club decided to meet twice a month, one meeting at 9:15 Friday night and the next at 4:30 Saturday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Bender. All students interested in the club are invited to the next meeting. Welcome—you new students of the second semester. Just Talk, the funny little feller at the head of this column, wishes you the best of everything— grades, dates, 'n' all that sort of thing —during your sojourn (ain't that a good word?) with us. By the way. Just. Talk's column also your column; it belongs to all the students. Whenever you have a burning idea about anything—how to rur the school, the right shade of green for freshmen, or anything else that'; red hot—write it down briefly and put it in the Cougar box in the office. Just Talk'll do the rest. CO-ED INTERVIEWS COUGAR Just Talk wishes right here to tell all freshmen not to be at all afraid of the Cougar. It won't bite, and its claws have all been clipped. In fact, the Cougar is such a nice li'l kitty that Genevieve Pledge actually interviewed it. Says Genevieve: Dear Editor and Caretaker of The Cougar: Last night, as unbelievable as i seems, I took a chance on getting ar interview with the Cougar himself by dropping around at his cage about 7 and found him just through with dinner and in a very jovial mood. After the formal greetings which he gave very informal manner, he began railing at me for not having come sooner. This was as much of a surprise to me as it will be to you, for Cougars ordinarily enjoy being left alone for a nap after dinner, but he explained his actions thoroughly before I left, and for the sake of public interest, I'll try to repeat the interview, word for wcj|d. "Yes," said the Cougar, licking: a few neglected morsals from his chops and settling himself for a comfy chat, "I know you are surprised at my after- dinner cordiality, but the fact remains that I'm glad to see you, for I have something important to say to the readers of my paper, and I i it through you. If you'll just take the trouble to take this down, it will give you the substance of what I am about to say. I need criticism!" Noting my puzzled expression, the Cougar smiled, wiggled his whiskers and offered his explanation. "Yes, criticism! Now, don't get the idea that I mean to have someone continually at my heels in a flurry of ragi over the audacity of this and the nerve of that—I don't! What I mean is this —if the students and readers in general would get together and give me some kind, helpful hints and constructive criticism—let me know what they want printed in my paper, which is 'theirs,' I have a heap easier time making an interesting success of that publica- Well, editor, you could have knocked me over without the feather by that tune, so I made my departure a rather sudden affair and hurried home to relay this to you, as I knew you would be interested. Sir, do you know that by the time I had walked home I had found plenty of time to think it over, and the more I thought, the more convinced I was that the Cougar knew what he was talking about, and I believe that if we can get it over to the readers what the Cougar meant by 'constructive criticism;' and show them the real desire that he has to please everyone, they will pitch in and help us satisfy old friend Cougar. A RAP FOR SNOBS Then, Jane Witherspoon, contributes a real idea—Jane has the good old H. J. C. down to a tee. "Why be stuck up?" asks Jane. And Just Talk adds another why. And Jane continues: "Why not be friendly ind natural? There has been quite a bit of talk on the subject in connection with a selected few. Whatever the motive, why give anyone a chance to talk? No one likes condescension, and condescension ^rtainly is a good excuse for unnecessary gossip. So dont' rely upon your "good THE COUGAR Literary Forum TOUGH ON FALSE TEETH If you have false teeth, weak jaws or adenoids, don't try to read this "poem' out loud. It is contributed by a struggling genius (he ought to struggle) who signs himself "G. Howie Skrib- bles." A tutor who tooted the flute Tried to tutor two tooters to toot. Said the two to the tutor: "Is it harder to toot, Or to tutor two tooters to toot?" Here's a woeful lament written by one of our own students. Kenneth, you have voiced the silent wail of innumerable H. J. C. "fish" and "sophs." AFTER THE HOLIDAYS By Kenneth Phillips "Oh, yes! I'll get my lessons up!" I made that resolution When school turned out to celebrate A long, two-weeks' vacation. An English theme, one thousand words, Or fifteen hundred long; Two thousand to five thousand words— An economics wrong. Then lots of textbooks lo be read If I can find the time;— I didn't do't it: that's the cause For this poor woeful rhyme. A CHANGE OF GAME "There's something about this poem that kind of gets you," said the literary editor as she handed this one to the chief. Who wrote it? The piece is merely signed "A Student's Contribution:" The Saturday we boys once knew, That brief respite from school, to us Meant happiness; our cares were few And even dirty yards meant naught. We'd play baseball or fight with swords, Then off we'd traipse down to the to catch "craw-dads" or gather gourds That grew along the rqad near there. Or maybe pick some "prickly pears," Pecans, persimmons, like as not We'd wind up hunting lions or bears Or Indians that we knew were near. And though we never caught a bear And redskins, too, seem'd mighty few. We knew for sure that they were there And we, with luck, would get them yet. Some years have pass'd; and now it seems The game we play is fruitless as (Despite our learning, greater means) Our hunts for bears and Indians then. It must be that which drove us on— That endless faith which made u< sure Some Indians lurked a bit beyond Now makes us feel the game's worth- Perhaps when all this strife is o'er We'll look back on the past and say. 'Our dreams were not in vain—what's ODE TO PROFS Our professor is so very wise— Our news writing he does criticize, He rips 'em up, he rips 'em down— And makes us feel just like a clown. Just wait; some day our art will grow And we can say, "I told you so." GRINS and GROANS GLEE CLUB— (Continued from Page 1) members for the practice of semi-popular music. According to Mr. Nigro, the work of the club is at the present time suspended in order that more intensive effort may be put forth toward the presentation of the play, "Nothing But the Truth," to be given by the Dramatic Club, this evening. No definite plans have yet been made for the continuance of the organization throughout the term. looks" to get you where you want to It will fail you every time. It Is not enough. Instead, try coming down to the level of the rest of the world. Conceit won't get by in Junior College. "When in Rome, shoot Roman candles." Just Talk says that snobs at H. J. C. are few and far between. He: Are you fond of golf? She: Am I? You should have seen the greens I ate for dinner. Prof.: "Now, class, I want you to notice the carvings on the cave walls." Stude: "My goodness, professor! did they have to remember telephone numbers in those days, too?" Jinny: "I've got two things on my mind for tonight." Jenny: "Let's call them both up and make it a double date." Blotto: "What's your name, little girl?" Blotta: "Annie." Blotto: "Annie what?" Biotta: "Anything." Do: "Once upon a time there were two Irishmen." Dodo: "There are a lot more of them The big star gave the umpire $50 to ./in the game and still they lost. Could the umpire have been dishonest? Antony: "Look here, Cleo, I don't like the idea of your dating up the whole Roman army." Cleopatra: "Listen, boy friend, do you think I got my technique in a correspondence school?" DEFINITIONS Band: A group of musicians banded together for self-defense. Ath-a-lete: A strong he-man who possesses a letter, a mob of admirers, an odor (perfume) and a drag. Fish: A Common character, usually all wet. Red Paint: Substance used to cover barns, co-ed's chteks, and towns. Sophomores: A group of old men and women, spending anywhere from their fourth to sixth year in college. Kenneth Phillips: "Don't you think that girl is cute? Walter Garrett: "She might have acute indigestion." Harvey Richards: "Yo ain't ya self more. Whatsa matter? Sick or son: thin'? Jo Ed Winfree: "Got insomia. Keep waking up ever few days. Pecan: "Did you say it was love at first sight? Fibert: "Yes. I got one look at her bankroll." Clergyman: "Milford, are you sure chewing gum is your worst enemy?" Milford S.: "I'm sure." Clergyman: "Then why do you chew it?" Mr. Birney: "You say you got $5 for your story?" Kenneth Phillips: "Yes, from the Express Company. They lost it." She: "You're no collar ad." He: "Well, you're no Fisher Body ad yourself, darling." She was only a fireman's daughter, and her father put out her flames every night. "Hey, ma, you said if I fed the baby tadpoles they'd kill him." "Well?" "They didn't." She: "Have you ever learned anything by correspondence?" He: "Yes. I never write to women lilford: "We'n to love our Jim Bertrand: "Our captain got 12 letters in three years." Gladys Jacobs: "What a small corre- One Co-ed: "My face is my fortune." 'Nother Co-ed: "Someone shortchanged you, my dear." G. W. "Whats' your name?" Howard: "Graham." G. W.: "1 hope you're not one of those wise crackers." DRAMATIC CLUB— (Continued from Page 1) which she had solicited for a charitable purpose. Warren Lemmon, as Bob Bennett, was placed in numerous situations, during the twenty-fours of the bet, where a few small fibs would prevent much embarrassment and disturbance. He might tell his fiance that he has never in his life kissed another girl. He might tell the wealthy society friend that her singing is beautiful, but to win he must confine himself to nothing but the truth. The feminine lead, Bob Bennett's fiance, was portrayed by Phyllis Katherine Workman. She had the role of Gwendolyn Ralston. Miss Workman's performance as the sweet and prominent society leader was remarkably done. Jane Witherspoon as the sophisticated mother of Gwen and Harvey Richards as Mr. Ralston and business associate of Bob, were well cast in their respective roles. Others actors who were blossomed forth in "Nothing But he Truth" and who showed much promise as showmen and show-women are Kenneth Phillips as Bishop Doran, Jimmie Bertrand Dick Donnelly, a third business partner in the brokerage firm; Albert Kindel as a firm customer and a party connected with the bet as Clarence Van Dusen; Gladys Jacobs as Ethel Clark, the society friend of Gwen's (Miss Jacobs sings in the third act); Lucile Cafcalus and Magda Soule are two flirtatious "dames" who cause plenty of trouble as Mable and Sable. Nora Louise Calhoon as Martha, the maid, completed the cast. Mr. Nigro, sponsor of the dramatic club, has worked night and day with the cast for the past four months, and he was well pleased with the performance as given by his budding thespians. A good sized audience attended the production. COLLEGE DEBATE— (Continued from Page 1) scheduled for April 24. They will determine state champions. An oratorical contest for both boys and girls will be held at Westminster Junior College at Tehuacana on April 3. In each instance the boys' and girls' contests will be separate. H. J. C. expects to enter the one-act play contests. It will have no district opponents, and therefore, will go to Hillsboro for the finals in the latter part of April. In addition to the intercollegiate contests, two special debates have been arranged by Coach Harris. Both are on the Free Trade question. H. J. C. will meet Temple Junior College at Bryan, and South Park Junior College of Beaumont will come to Houston for its debate. Dates will be announced later. The debate with Texas University has been called off. Coach Harris has begun training his teams, and promises good results. STUDENT PRESENTS BOOKS Two books have been presented to the H. J. C. library by T. H. Mattingly, i student at the college. The books are "Fixed Bayonets" and Red Pants" by Capt. John W. Thorn-
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