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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 5, April 1930
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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 5, April 1930 - File 002. April 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/139/show/136.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 5, April 1930 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/139/show/136

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 5, April 1930 - File 002, April 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/139/show/136.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 5, April 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. III, No. 5, April 1930
Contributor
  • Shepperd, Louise
Date April 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "A monthly newspaper devoted to the interests of Houston Junior College. Published by the Journalism Department, Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR THE COUGAR «• {• c. follows fashion^ jmior College Song A monthly n<-wsp;iiit>r devoted to the interests of Houston Junior l*(il1eK(.. Pub lished by the Journalism Department Houston Junior College. EDITORIAL STAFF Louise Shepperd Editor- In -Chief b*nls Snelgr . N*wa Rditor Harry seaman Issue Kdltor harotd Wood Sports Doris Hartman Itumor Jane Wltherspoon Kxthange Ma'.nine Kdmi i-ter . . Copy Kiisannn Hodsnii Literary Prances Willard Feature P. R. Birney.. Advil REPORTERS George Ames Donald Lane Morv Artelr <\.M) Latnaii Ijnitu "is. Adah Davis Hfsw R. E. Neil Myrlo Kerbow ivaline Horn Otis S. Jackson Mrs. KraniK: Konyon Sarali I'hilllps Minerva Mayfioid Weldon Mi'ddors Mi Fred Mills Jliirold Surmm-rlin Let's Arbitrate By R. E. NEIL Arbitration, that wonderful way in which wars are averted, thus bestowing peace and prosperity upon the continents of the world and saving hundreds of thousands of lives and vast fortunes, is the first word in today's government. Arbitration is the ultra modern, the economic and the peaceful means of settling all disputes arising among different countries. You may pick up a daily newspaper and see where your country has formed an agreement with another country in regard to trade, ships, armament, tariff, etc. The leading nation of the luture will replace the army and itavy of today with stern, set jawed, silver tongued orators. This will call for the training of more young men to suit the needs of the government. Junior College has a debating team. A team that would do credit to any college and we are proud of it. "Trial by Jury" will be presented at an early date in the auditorium and the proceeds will go to defray the expenses of the Texas University team scheduled for a debate here on May 2. This will be tbe last debate of this school year. Support your team to the utmost, for some day the members of the same team may save your own sons and daughters and your fellow man from a bloody battle field. Advertising H. J. C. "Oh, yoi don't you. to college. "But it i Crestfallen go to that night school, 1 thought you were going t college you retort quite id not a little infuriated. You try to explain to this very unin. formed person just where Junior College stands and what a perfectly lovely institution it is. Three years have all but passed since the inauguration of this educational center and yet many literate citizens of this community are stilt unaware of the fact that this is not merely a night school (for that term too definitely implies only commercial and business courses) but is an affiliated two-year college. Of course it would be tolly to expect this school which has been in existence so short a time to be very widely known. It takes long years, a large alumni of influential men, prerogatives and precedents to change a school from an unknown to a known; to give a romantic touch to its name like Yale, Oxford or Harvard. Running a school without advertising is like winking at a girl in the dark—you know what you are doing but no one else does. It is not a fault of the Board, this advertising, nor of the faculty, but of the student body, and until it (student body) definitely establishes the school with honor in her own country through the correct advertising channels, it ha8 failed in IN INAUGURATING POLL FOR PRETTIEST GIRLS The contest for the most popular girl and the most beautiful girl to represent Junior College at the big dance in the gym on May 9, is to be held from April 23 to 30. The Cougar Collegians, who are In charge ot the election have announced that the student body may buy votes for one cent each, the funds to go to the athletic fund of the club. Candidates are to be nominated by members of the club at a special meeting next week. Campaign managers will then be appointed for each contestant. The ballot box will be placed in Mrs. Bender's office and students may vote from 5 to 7:30 o'clock each night during the week. Tbe fair co-eds who are elected will i introduced along with the representatives of the five senior high schools at the dance. In a similar election held last spring, two members of the freshman class, Misses Mary Ellen Lusk and Gertrude Beard, were elected the most beautiful and most popular respectively. they TALK BY MINISTER ON TOPICS OF INTEREST ASSEMBLY FEATURE Rev. J. G. Kidd, tbe father of Ruth Kidd, one of the most prominent students at Junior College, gave a very tertaining talk at the Wednesday assembly. April 9. Parents are always welcome at Ju- or College, especially when ove to be such interesting a ented ones as those who have spoken in the assembly. Kidd told some very enjoyable jokes and wound up his splendid talk with some earnest advice in the "man to man" attitude that always appeals to growing young minds. The appreciation of the students and faculty was expressed by the cordial applause hich Rev. Kidd received. The atmosphere at Junior College is charged with activity. It Is getting close to vacation time, and there s i large class of forty-five gradu- ting. There's the Sponsorship of the Interschnlastic League to be taken ery seriously. To say nothing of the big annual senior reception that comes the ninth of May, and the Student Activity Dance to be held at the University Club on the second of May. According to Robert McCullough and Roy Hofheinz, "Trial by Jury" Is to be presented again in the auditorium of tbe Junior College in the near future. One thousand tickets are to sold at 25c each. The members of the cast are to hand over the forthcoming money to a worthy department of the school, who will bring the first team of debating of the Texas University here to Houston, for purpose of having a debate with the Junior College team. LETTER COMES— (Continued from page 1) area and is dotted with many islands formerly the tops of bills and moun- ins. .Over this lake you go almost half way across the isthmus to Cule- bra Cut. This is a channel thai has been cut through a mountain. It is miles long and has been hewn through solid rock. Jt is 'certainly an amazing sight to see and makes you marvel at the greatness o. the work that has been done. You are on the Pacific side and come to Pedro Miguel lock when you are lowered thirty feet. Two miles further on you are lowered fifty-five feet by the Miraflores locks and then you are in the Pacific Ocean. In all of the locks, the vessel is handled on both sides by three mighty electric towing locomotives. Everything is done with clock-like precision and ease and a high degree of efficiency. Uncle Sam has the canal well fortified and there are airplanes overhead and warships | in the water on either side. In all, It is a magnificent, perfect machine (Words by Alice and Bobbie McCullough) Fill your hearts with school spirit. Shout till the rafters ring! Praise your Junior College with grit- Let every loyal student sin.s- (Oh!) Fight when you go out tc play, And let your colors fly. Fight for Houston Junior College Let spirit reign until you die-. To the world,—to the school! To the team in its glorious fight so fine, To the coach,—to the plays To the fight of the Cougars in battle line- To the profs,—and the sophs. And the freshmen who help win to To the blue,—to the white, To the school that we all loved today- Exchange an import SYMPATHY EXTENDED We extend our sincerest sympathy to William Shaw on the death of his father, Hampton Lee Shaw. j and a sight wonderful to see. 1 I will be in China in ihe middle of May and I am looking forward with 1 great interest to meeting your friend. Give my very best regards to all of my friends and class mates and with kindest regards, I am Sincerely Yours, Stant Cowley. To add a little variety to the Exchange Column, the following _okes ave been taken from our exchange The Kennel, published by tht Texarkana Junior College: Sap: Why did they bury the captain at sea? Head: Because he was d(»\d! Usher: How many please? Exasperated person; There were ve of us but three died. She was only the stableman's daughter, but boy, how that girl could stall. She calls him Pilgrim; 'cause every time he calls he makes a little progress. Doctor: You are all run down. Try a few electric baths. Patient: No, Doc. my brother got drowned that way at Sing Sing. Harold G.: "I know a place where women don't wear anything- except string of beads once in awhile" Little . W. (awed): "Where?" Harold G.: "Around their necks, stupid." Attorney: And whert- did you see him milking the cow? Jack T.: A little past the center, sir. The Bay Window, published by the Muskegon Junior College: Lady: "The pint of milk you brought yesterday was sour. What are you going to do about It'" One Sport Helps Other Bridge Party Shows On Saturday afternoon. Marcn 29, the Cougar collegians club gave a bridge party, proceeds from which were to be used to buy football blankets. Approximately sixteen or seventeen dollars was realized. The card party was given at the lovely home of Mary Alice Graves. Refreshments, delicious cookies and punch were served. Twenty tables were prepared, though only nine were used. Tallies were donated by the Pilgrim Laundry, and prizes by drug stores and down town stores. Several numbers were sung by Willard Nesmith. J. D. Larkin played several numbers on the accordion .and piano. Grace MacDonald did hostess duties assisted by Lisabelle Critren- Door prizes were won by Margaret Boyett and Mildred Smith. Mary Ellen Lusk won the girls high prize, a compact. Girls low prize was won by Miss Lomis, a visitor from Lake Charles at the home of Miss Critten- don. Boys high prize was won by Bill Sears, door prize, a scarf pin, was won by Weldon Medders, while Donald Long won low prize, a pencil. Wonder what's up between uene- vieve Weldon and Allen Eaton? Know anything about it? 11' ol' Joe Peabody. How's your racket? And some of our tennis chanu-fons Fritz Kohlhousen for one. History of Harris1 County Court House A small log cabin for a c-aurt house,! a couple of tables under an awning for a market, a back room in a small country store for a postoffice. These were the places where the first af-l fairs of Houston and Harris County were looked after in the early days. The first grand jury met behind a screen of bushes under a Dig tree. At the same time, the Congress of the Republic of Texas was in session in a rough wooden structure on the site of the present Rice Hotel. It was in 1838, while Harris County was still called Harrisburg County, that the first court house was erected. It was in 1838, while Harris uoun- ty was still called Harrisburg County, that the first court house was erected. This court house was erected on the corner of Congress Avenue and San Jacinto Street and faced Congress Avenue. It was constructed of pine logs and was in two parts, under one roof and separated by a gallery. Each of the two rooms was about sixteen feet square, and the gallery was ten feet wide. In the rear were two small rooms, about ten feet square, which were used by the county and district clerks. The first brick court house was erected in 1859 and was built near and fronting Congress Avenue. This building was practically a three-story structure, having a large basement, used to store records and such documents. This house, becoming unsafe, was torn down, and a larger one of similar design was built nearly on hte same site in 1869. Much of the brick and other suitable material from the torn down building was purchased . by Rev. Father Querat, and used in I the construction of the Church of the I Annunciation on Texas Avenue. A | third brick court house was erected j in 1882, and was placed farther back | nearer the center of the block than its two predecessors. It was quite an imposing structure, superior in every, way to the one that had preceded it. I It stood longer, too, but was torn down In 1908 to give place to the present magnificent building. An election was held April 22, 1907, and the county was authorized to is* sue $1,000,000 in bonds for the purpose of building county roads. The money was to be divided between the roads and court house. As soon as the necessary legal preliminaries could be taken, the contract for the new court nouse was let and work was begun. The contract was a large one, and a large sum of money was involved, but from the time of the construction of the building, to its completion, there was not a hint of "graft" or other dishonesty connected with it. The building cost $450,000 unfurnished. It Is no exaggeration to say that the Harris County building is a superb building. It is built of Texas granite, St. Louis hydraulic pressed brick, marDie, structural steel, bronze and terra cotta, and it is one of the handsomest buildings to be found anywhere. It is almost square and is two hundred feet high from the base to the dome. It is of beautiful architecture. The large columns are of solid granite and have Corinthian capitals. There are four broad flights of stairs made of granite, one on each side of the building, leading to the second story where various county offices are located. The basement is used as offices for the justices of the peace and other purposes. The higher courts are located on the third floor. Everything is admirably arranged for the comfort and convenience of the occupants. The interior finish is in every way in keeping with the beautiful exterior, and on the whole, Harris County has reason to be proud of its court house. At the unoccupied corners of the block are neatly kept grass plots, and surrounding the entire block is a low granite wall. Rowa of beautiful oak trees border all four sides of the block within the granite wall. Those at the four corners are much larger than the others. The reason for this is that they were planted by Mr. J. R. Morris, over a quarter of a century ago. He planted them with his own hands, saying that he put them there to serve as his monument and cause people to think of him some time Mrs. Bender 3y LOUISE SHEPPERD Who out here at Junior College, Befriends all those in search ot knowl- Wlio hears tales of woe and joys? Who is loved by girls and boys? rs. Bender. Who is told of long, hard fights, To keep up work and school at nights? Mrs. Bender. Who's the student's friend in need? Who makes sympathy her creed? Mrs. Bender. Who keeps check on bats and bojks. Lost by students in odd nooks? Mrs. Bender. Who hears reasons for a cut? "This" and "that" *nd "so"' and "but"? Mrs. Bender. Who links student fun with knowledge? She's the pride of Junior Cillege-- Mrs. Bender. THE HALL PROMENADE Harry Seaman and Ed Cunningham going out for a jolly old chat. Two more good friends, "Girlie" Cobb and Lucille Seeley. going out, shall we say, for a whiff of fresh And close behind Helen Davis, "what I really mean is, I want to know, "where's Girlie?" Claire Brown and Pete Garrison headed for the cafeteria at 7 o'clock, and we thought Pete was invulnerable, but who could be invulnerable And in the cafeteria, Brooks Davis, who is one of the Lord's gifts to divine dancers. How does he do it? We .. feel out of place beside him. Then Mary Alice Graves. Put Mary Alice and Brooks together and you have a combination that can't be beat - on the dance floor. steadies, Maurine Edminster and Terry Russ. Did you happen to see Maurine in the nice blue dress " and light hat and shoes? Well, happen to some time. We don't, like Terry any more—we nearly ran Into him * on Webster the other day. Catherine Meyers and Jane Wltherspoon—oh, what S. A. they ba\e. Mr. and Mrs. Duggan coming up the driveway in their cute Po^tiac " coupe. And that jolly old thing. Mr. Miner—we wouldn't mind our profs if m they were all like Miner. Bill Jeter, and by the expression on his face he should be singing Lover, Come Back to Me." Wonder where's Micky? And then we saw her with Willard, Who's beating who's time? Do you know that John Goc'year m smokes the foulest cigars in this school? And Max Ludtke runs him a close second. Did you see the janitor's five . weeks old baby when it was vlsJing here the other night? Gee, but its cute-. Myrle Kerbow going out to the car with her big "bub." We thini. a whole lot of Mr. Kerbow for having a sis- f ter like Myrle. Oliver McCall and Lucille Bnwaen. Aren't they they cutest couple, and they're both such darlings. Francis Willard and Soapy Mc- Ginty. He finally met her after bothering everyone in school to iair-jduce him. Plenty cute, hub? And that big polo-player, Hugh Manford. He's substituting for the Yellow Jackets Tuesday. t And Wayne Phelps. Wonder why the look? Doc Black, in a big hurry, What do you keep in that big satchel anyway? And that great saying, "There is * only one thing that I know, I know ithing'" That's all! Boop—poop—a—doop! , when they rested under their shade. The court house was formally dedicated on Texas Independence Day, March 2, 1911. The ceremonies were very elaborate and impressive. The Harris County court house will meet all demands that are likely to be made on it for many years to come.
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