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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931
File 003
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931 - File 003. May 27, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/134/show/132.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 27, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/134/show/132

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931 - File 003, May 27, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/134/show/132.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 12, May 27, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date May 27, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR Society (Editor's Note: There's a touch of something or other in this charming bit of sentiment from our popular Goose Slayer. Read it and then go j and kick a cat.) In the Spring When the release Of Spring frees The breeze, And trees Put on leaves, And girls tease, And the wind snows their knees, When boys try to please The dumbest of she's, I put on my B. V. D.'s, And sneeze, And wheeze, And dern nearly freeze. Question: Please, Mr. Goose Slayer, what can I do to avoid falling hair? Answer: Jump nimbly to one side. Bill Spitler says the artist who said this country is a madhouse must have been a devotee of the links. George Snyder, a bridge fan, always likes to have John Berger in his foursome. "It's best to have a 'dummy,'" says George. Homer Lowe says so far as he is concerned courses neeu not have fairways. "The woods are certainly pretty in the springtime."—Homer. Girls are now seen in large numbers at "Muny" getting their sun-tan. Marguerite Combaire claims she is learning the game fast and so far has only missed two trees and one player. Laurence Lenny has just invented a ball with a taximeter attached; thus the ball automatically counts the strokes. However, Lennie, who shoots in the 90's (on the first five holes), claims that the ball really isn't practical Professor of History and Economics. M. A., University of South Carolina. Thinking is but an idle waste of thought, And naught is everything and everything is naught. —James Smith. WALLACE H. MINER ?! .^rw ■am? i ' !b ' { * « I - ::' : .j$ ■ i* :: M |i m § ': - : :■ ■': j ■ill M jjg3 |i?^iS;?||;::;:::: Professor of English and European History. B. A., Allegheny College. M. A., Columbia University. PROFESSOR GIVES— (Continued from page I) to enter either Texas University, Texas A. & M., or Rice Institute schools of engineering," stated Professor Herrington. "Nearly all schools of all branches of engineering, including mechanical, electrical, civil, architectural, textile^ minging, and chemical engineering, require the courses we offer." Engineering Drawing 113 is the practical art of drafting. It fits students for all engineering courses. Descriptive Geometry 123 is the science of drafting. Drafting is recognized as a profession in itself. Pure Kinematics is the science of motion without any consideration of forces and materials involved. Constructive Kinematics takes in the con- sideraaition of these forces and materials. "Both branches are the beginning of machine design," according to Professor Herrington. "But since the student has not had enough mathematics and other technical subjects, most of the work of the second term concerned, with impirical design that has been found to meet most requirements." "Engineering Drawing," by French, is used in the 113 class. Giesecke & Mitchell's text and problems are used in 123. "Mechanism" by Schwamb, Merrill, & James is the text for 213., "Machinery's Handbook" in conjunction with other texts furnished by the instructor and by the library supply material for the 223 class. Professor Herrington takes off his hat to W. T. Richard, Jr., "He's the only student I've seen in six years teaching of the subject who could go. through a term's work of Descriptive Geometry in 12 weeks without the help, of an instructor," said Mr. Herrington. "Look! How is this for neat work?" Mr. Richard plans to be a junior at Rice Institute next year. He started in Engineering Drawing. Several graduate engineering students of H. J. C. are at Texas University, Texas A. and M., and Rice at the present time. Several more will attend those schools next year. MINER LECTURES ON CULTURE OF CHINA Interesting facts about China were given in two lectures by Professor W. H. Miner on Tuesday evening, May 12, and Thursday evening, May 14. Professor Miner has been a resident in China for some years and is now with the Houston Junior College. He considered an authority on Chinese culture and art. He speaks the dialect of North China fluently. Professor Miner spoke Tuesday night on "Chinese Characteristics," scribing the approach to Cnina, the semi-foreign life of the port cities, and the village life in the mountainous regions. "North China and Western Influences" was the topic of the Thursday night lecture. The advent of inventions and their influence on China was lustrated and many scenes within the capital itself revealed the life of the Oriental city. The lectures were supplemented with 200 views of Chinese life. The ancient educational system and views of the old educational halls completed the lecture. Assistant Dean M. A., University of Texas. SCHOOL OFFERS— (Continued from page 1) to offer the best in the educational field through the freshman and sophomore years. Credits from this department) may be transferred to advanced colleges for credit toward a degree. Among the outstanding courses for the summer term are Education 223-H and 223-g. There ?re the, teacher training classes in which students will do actual classroom work,, thereby gaining practical experience in teaching. These classes will run for nine) weeks each. In addition there will be the usual six weeks courses in educational psychology, elementary methods, and general methods in high school teaching. The freshman courses include biology 113-123, chemistry 114-124, education 113-123, English 113-123, French A-a, history 123, history 113L-123L, mathematics 113-123, physical education 113-123, physics 113, 114, public school art 113, public school music 113- 123, public school wriing 113, and Spanish Aa-Bb. Sophomore courses include economics 213, education 213-H, 223-H,' 223-E, 213-F, 231-1, 223-1, government 213-223, public school art 213-223, and sociology 213. PROGRAM GIVEN— (Continued from page 1) Kenneth Phillips, as class prophet, in a long black robe and with his magic bottle of "Time Dispeller" took the audience forward ten years, and presented a hilarious predicament of the graduates as he saw them to be in 1941. "Why They Must Part," immortalizing the lowly onion, was a reading given by Miss Atha Marks. As an encore Miss Marks kept her audience in uproarious laughter with a "proposition proving that man is constructed in the wrong construction, and that the different parts of his anatomy is situated in the wrong situation." The graduating exercises will be held at the Buffalo Stadium, Tuesday, May 26, at 8 p.m., according to ment by Mr. Dupre. Instructor of Matchematics. Southwestern University. M. A versity of Texas. MANY WORKERS— (Continued from page 1) "Junior College students are a well- behaved bunch." Approximately 130 public school teachers are enrolled at H. J. C, according to J. H. Ledlow, registrar, and according to L. T. Cunningham, assistant to the superintendent of public schools, may use work taken at Houston Junior College as residence work in obtaining teaching certificates instead of having to go away to secure such work. Outstanding among Junior College students who work are Harold Woods, president of the graduating class, and S. W. (Pete) Garrison, president of the sophomore class. Mr. Woods works at Bennett's drug store «s a clerk, and Mr. Garrison is a blueprinter at the Humble Oil Company. Miss Opal Bean is another graduate who works. Miss Bean is a P. B. X. operator and office girl in Dr. John T. Moore's office. Roy Paton, 1930 graduate, is a route manager at Phenix Dairy. Mr. Paton, a former school teacher, asserts that Houston Junior College furnished him a much needed opportunity to broaden his educational background. Miss Hazel Taylor and Miss Ruth Maples are working at the local Red Cross chapter. Miss Fay Gene Lawrence is secretary and bookkeeper with the Gulf Concrete Pipe Company and Carleton Thompson is a Texas Company file clerk. \ Among other H. J. C. students who aro employed are: Iollah Bell Copeland, statistician at Western Union; J. B. Parr, installer for Southwestern Bell; Helen Higgins, clerk; Gordon Davis, of the Houston Post-Dispatch, and Milton Moffett engraver. GRADUATES' BAY PARTY Is a bay party at Casa del Mar, planned for Thursday afternoon and night, May 28, a fitting close to the season's activities ot the graduating class of H. J. C? The graduates think They plan an afternoon picnic, to be followed by bathing, dancing, bridge, and what-not. Some of the students will return to Houston that night, while many will spend the night there, returning Friday morning. Each member of the party will be charged a nominal fee, and may take one guest. Casa Del Mar, the Y. W. C. A. summer home, is situated on the boyshore between Sylvan Beach and Morgan's Point, near La Porte. The social committee, appointed by Harold Wood, president, consists of Mo- zelle McReynoIds, chairman; Sue Sell- ingsloh, Lucian Bukowski, Lyndell Parker, and Kenneth Phillips. BAILEY-TIDD Miss Beulah Bailey of H. J. C. and, William Tidd of Houston were married at Galveston May 3. Rev. Mr. Harold; L. Fickettt performed the ceremony at the First Baptist Church in Galveston. The bride and groom are now at home at 2612 Fannin Street. for the most popular girl were Ca-j mille Campbell, Jefferson Davis; Martina Dunnam, San Jacinto; Billie Beth Hanner, Milby; Billie Fisher, Sam, Houston; and Genevieve Weldon, Junior College. LITERARY FORUM— (Continued from page 2) CAMP FIRES There on the landscape before me Stretching so far out of sight, Bright, tiny bonfires were burning, Sending up stars in the night. Bright were the flames as they mounted, Glowing with warmth and good cheer, Deeper the shadows were falling Upward the smoke clouds careered. Dark now, the twilight has faded Into the dreams of the past; Gone now the bright flaming bonfires, Leaving sweet fancies that last. —Florence Scott G. W. VANZEE M. S.. University of Illinois. Professor of Biology. RECEPTION HELD— (Continued from page 1) was decorated with green and yellow streamers and beautiful spring flowers. The program opened with a selection by Murray McCoy and his Aristorats Orchestra. This was followed by an address by Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, president of Junior College and superintendent of the city schools. The speaker was introduced by E. M. Black, dean of the college, who said the purpose of the receptions was to establish contacts with the high school graduates. This was followed by the beauty parade, after which the audience voted on the most beautiful girl. AH candidates were presented with arm corsages by Earlene Gunn, president of the Junior College Honor Society. For the guests not desiring to dance, there was a one-act play given in the school auditorium. The play was written by Mrs. T. H. Mattingly, a Junion College Student, and directed by H. V. Nigro. Those in the cast included Gladys Jacobs, Jane Witherspoon, Margaret Lee Webb, Nora Louise Calhoun, Albert Kindal, Jack Thurman, and C. G. Hall. The candidates presented were Sara Street, San Jacinto; Annie Ruth Settle, Reagan; Fay Harter, Jefferson Davis; Wilma Lindsay, Sam Houston; and Maurine Edminster, Junior College, for the most beautiful girl. Candidates COLLEGE CUTIE SAYS— (Continued from page 2) do—Lula Mae Smith and Betty Groen- lund have cut theirs, to say nothing of countless others! There go a pair of inseparables! Margaret Lee Webb and Jane Ross. By the way, wasn't Margaret Lee the lizard's eyebrows in the play the other night? She was ma-dame Blanche— and how! It's going to break my heart to have to cut this short, but you have an, idea how the necessities run, I'm sure —too bad, but this is goo'-by' 'till nexS year. Here's for bigger and better news and scandals! With a heap o' love and kisses, yours. —Cutie. £. W. SCHUHMANN Instructor of Physics and Mathematics. M. A., University of Texas.
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