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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931 - File 002. May 27, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/134/show/131.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 27, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/134/show/131

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931 - File 002, May 27, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/134/show/131.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 12, May 27, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date May 27, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR The Cougar Published semi-monthly during the college year. Subscription, $1.00 per year. Single copies, 10 cents. EDITORIAL. BOARD Editor-in-Chief Everett Kendall Associate Editor Walter Garrett Associate Editor Kenneth Phillips Associate Editor . Margaret Shell Associate Editor Rubye Tunnell Faculty Advisor F. R. Birney Department Editors Literary . .. Genevieve Pledge Society Maurine Edminster Sports-Men Milton Moffitt Humor June Witherspoon Activity Frances Baty Exchange Llewelyn Boss Feature Ethel Mercer Reporters Chapell Freeman B ea trice H am i 1 to n Lois Harrison Montford Inman A, C. Irwin Fay Laurence Ethel Mercer Rubye Tunnell Llewellyn Ross Pauline Ault Frances Baty Opal Beane Lucille Cafcalas Evelyn Cochran Welton Cohen Gordon Davis Ruth Dermody Lois Du£f GRADUATION Graduation! What magic lies in that word, what dreams and traditions surround it. How much it means to those fifty-one students who will receive diplomas from the Houston Junior College on Wednesday evening, May 27. Some of them have been here only two years, carrying the full number of courses each year. Some have been here three, some four, years, having found it necessary to do part-time school work because of outside employment. To all of them we offer our heartiest congratulations. Many of these students will go on to other schools next year. Some of them will find it impractical to com-, , plete more than the two years of college work and will enter upon their business careers after graduation. Others are regularly employed business people who entered school here with the intention of completing only the work offered by the Junior College. But whether or not these graduates continue in school, there is no question that the work done in Junior College will he of inestimable value to them. The satisfaction of having completed this much college work will make it worth while. On the practical side, there is little doubt but that one who has had two years of college training will be given preterence by business concerns over one who has only a high school education. . It is with both pleasure and regret that we see these students go out from Junior College. Pleasure, because they have achieved that for which they were coming here and are now a step farther on their way to success. Regret, because we have been both proud and happy to have them as classmates and friends and will be sorry to have such associations end. But wherever they go, our sincere wishes for success and happiness are theirs. NIGHT CLASSES In 1927 the question uppermost in the minds of Houston school officials was: Will a junior college, holding classes during the evening hours, be a success? For such a school, the first in Texas, was to be put into operation in Houston at the beginning of that fall school term. Four years have passed. There has been ample time to test the value of the night junior college. And as these years have gone by it has been increasingly evident that the success of the institution is assured. During the second year of its existence the Houston Junior College ranked first among the junior colleges of Texas in size and in standing. That place it has held ever since, and with each semester the enrollment has increased. Fifty-one students will receive diplomas from this junior college at the close of the present year. This brings the total number of graduates up to 128. The majority of these students would not have been able to complete these first two years of college work (at any rate, as soon as they did) had it not Qjr CollegeCoheOa^S Golly, oh, golly! School will be over soon. Wonder where everybody will be next year, and who is going to be left here with me. Maybe Bill Jester and Frances Willard will be back . They have been here only four years, and they still have a few good years left in them (that is, if they don't weaken too often.) Wonder where Jack Thurman is going! He's planning on trying to become a pre-med. There's Earlene Gunn . . . Can she play a piano! Hearin' is believin'. Margaret Shell is certainly—how shall we say it?—attractive? Yep! Irene Speiss and Rena Mai may be successfully added to the list of "at- tracties"—(a new word). Have you heard any queer or unusual (?) noises around the driveways after seven? It might be Wayne Liver, good's Ford. He has started carrying tubs around with him and I don't mean "broads". You know, you can certainly hear lot of funny (?) things around school. We heard a rumor about Maurice and Terry, but of course, you know, there's not a word of truth in it. Oh, I heard something else and this ..as funny—but it didn't work out far enough. You know about M. L. and G. P. Then there was K. M. and R. D. Golly, I got all interested in matters and it suddenly ended—and not the "correct" ending either! There is Margaret Mounger—pretty, huh? Wish I knew the "shadow's" name. They make a cute couple. Look! Verne Perryman loping around looking for Ed! You know, these blond men are worse than the women! Which is it, Warren, Phyliss or Beatrice? Elsie Peters, as I live and breathe! That girl has just about all "a's" and "b's" for her record at the college. Did someone make a crack about blondes being dumb? There's the guy with the dizzy fingers—who? Why, H. D., of course! Absolutely, Rebecca or Becky (take your choice) Fisher is my idea of a honey or two! But she'll be at Rice next year. So will Julia Green, I think. Wonder where Coloma Powers will be? Couldn't you murder her for cutting that gorgeous hair? But that seems to be the thing to (Continued on page 3) MRS. HANNAH SHEARER GRINS and GROANS been for the fact that classes were held in the late afternoon and in the evening. Many of them could not have done any college work at all, because they find it necessary to do full-time work in town, by which some are supporting not only themselves but members of their families as well. The desirability of a college education is being realized more and more by the public in general. If ambitious young men and women_ can hold full-time jobs and at the same time complete their first two years of college work at night, even though it may take them longer than the allottuu two years, it is probable that they will be resourceful enough to find some way in which to attend school for the additional two years needed to obtain a degree. It is for these working students that Houston Junior College holds its greatest appeal. It is because of their demand for the opportunities offered by night classes that the school has grown so rapidly and will continue to grow. And it is because of their enthusiastic support that evening classes will not be discontinued, even though the present plans for a day school for Houston Junior College are put into effect Librarian at H. J. C, State College. H Literary Forum FR GOO'NESS SAKE! Last edition, you know, we blamed it all on spring and its ailments—now we're at a loss. What should be blamed for this? "TRA LA LA" I used to write poems when I was a lad And thought they were good when they really were bad, For they had too much rhythm and moral, it seems, And the metre and rhyme would give poets the "scream* . So I read lots of Sandburg, St. Vincent Millay, Some Masefield, and Lowell, and others they say Write poems In such an artistical way. Now I am ready—my reading is done; I'm reeling out poems—it really is fun. No longer I'm ancient—oh, modernly 1 sing, For now I've drung deep of the Pierian spring. My poems are gathered and put in a book And on the first chapter I wish you would look. Soon you will see there the great pains it took: I. I saw a cow the other day— Tra la la and a la la tra, Munching on some new mown hay, Tra la la and a la la tra. I asked her what made her eat all that there hay, She replied, "Well, we bovines are just built that way." Some blow flies buzzed around my Tra la la and a la la tra, I cuss them out—they make me sore, Tra la la and a la la tra. But the more I cuss, the longer they stay, It must be that blow flies are just built that way. I saw a girl the other night, Tra la la and a la la tra, Holding a boy so very tight, Tra la la and a la la tra. He cried, "Give me air, Sal! Now listen, I say!" It must be that women are just built that way. Now that's the first chapter—I think you'll agree It's not half as bad as it really could be, But if it sounds crazy—shucks—it's all O. K. For truly, great poets are just built that way. —Milton Moffitt. Since it's the time of the year when people think of camping and campfires, how's this little poem by Florence Scott? (Continued on page 3) Gave 'Em the Razz The wife and daughter of Colonel Berry, camp commander, came to the gate after taps and demanded admission. The sentry objected. "But, my dear man, you don't understand," expostulated the older woman. "We are the Berrys." "I don't care if you're the cat's pajamas," retorted the sentry. "You can't get in at this hour." ■ He Took the Count .Dumb: While I was out with some of the boys the other night, a burglar broke into my house. Other dumb person: Did he get anything? Dumb: I'll say he did! My wife thought it was me coming home late. One-Act Drama Dark night . . . man with hat over eyes . , . woman with revolver approaches. BANG! Man falls, gasps: "Woman, I ain't your husband." Woman looks closer. "Oh, I beg your pardon." Curtain. "My wife used to piay the piano a lot, but since the children came she doesn't have time." "Children are a comfort, aren't Kenneth P: Did you ever speak before a large audience?- Walter G: A fairly large one, once. Kenneth P.: What did they say? Walter G.: Not guilty. "Darling, I love you." "Good gracious! Why, we've only become acquainted." "Yes, I know; but I'm only here for the week-end." "At the dance the other night, my suspenders broke right in the middle of the floor." "And weren't you embarrassed nearly to death?" "Well, not very. My roommate had Liza: Is yo' sho' yo' want to marry me, Big Boy? Rastus: I sho' is, honey. Ah's even made arrangements to quit mah job. Phil H.: Jack Thurman has decided not to take a medical course. Lurille C: The brave boy! Just think of the lives he's saved. "It must be awful to be a debt collector. You must be unwelcome wherever you go." "On the contrary, practically everybody asks me to call again.'' Patient: Will that anaesthetic make me sick? Doctor: Not a bit Patient: How long will it be before I know anything? Doctor: See here, young man, isn't that asking a good deal of an anaesthetic? Once upon a time an enterprising poultryman crossed his hens with parrots to save time. He used to spend much time in hunting the eggs, but now the hens walk up to him and say: "Hank, I just laid an egg. Go get it" She: Now what are you stopping for? He (as car comes to a halt): I've lost my bearings. She: Well, at least you are original; most fellows run out of gas. Teachi Who' is the smartest man Pupil: Thomas A. Edison . He invented the phonograph and the radio so people would stay up all night and use his electric light bulbs." "Oh, officer! There's a man following me and I think he is drunk. Officer (giving her the once over): Yes, he must be! Sonny: Mother, I have a surprise for you. Mother: Let's have it, son. Sonny: I swallowed a tack. Date: Something seems to be wrong with this flivver, doesn't it? Co-ed: Don't be silly. Wait until we get out of town. They were discussing a mutual "Yes," said Brown, "1 saw Fish the other day, and he was treating his wife in a way that I wouldn't treat a dog." "Good gracious!" said Hammond in shocked tones. "What was he doing?" "He was kissing her." Policeman: Lady, dont you know this is a safety zone? Woman Driver (in aifficulties): Of course; that's why I drove in here. "Why does a red-headed woman always marry a meek man?" "She doesn't. He just gets that way!" Wife: Do you realize that twenty- five years ago we became engaged? Absent-minded Prof: Twenty-five years! You should have reminded me before. It's certainly time we got married. The Crooner Crowned Filbert: That orchestra has got everything, hasn't it? Pecan: Everything but a crooner. Filbert: What do you mean? Pecan: I just attended to that. He: Why do you say I don't love you any more? She: I haven't had to slap your face for a week. "Now, boys," said the Scotch professor, "if you will just put a few crazy answers in your examination papers I can sell them to a magazine for twenty dollars." Father Gabriel was addressing a group of boys and offered 25 cents to the one who could tell him the name of the world's greatest man. "I think it is Mussolini," said an Italian lad. "George Washington," said an American boy. A Jewish boy shouted: "Saint Patrick." "Correct," said Father Gabriel, "but tell me, me lad, why you think St. Patrick the greatest." 'Right down in my heart I think it was Moses," replied the Jewish boy. "But business is business." Of course you've heard about the correspondence school student who cuts classes. He sends empty envelopes. •You may have troubles, but cheer up. Think what a hard time crosseyed people have looking each other straight in the eye. Or imagine a sufferer from St. Vitas Dance having rheumatism with it. Or a person who couldn't speak attending H. J. C. assembly. Singer: "Ever since singing that song yesterday it has seemed to haunt me." Kum Back: "Why not? You murdered it." Stewed Logic First Drunk: "Wha shu doin' over here under thish street lite?" Second Same: "Lookin* fur my muzzers diamond ring." First: "Wher'd you losh it?" Second' "Over there on tuther side of a shtreet.' First: "Why don' shu look over Second: "Thersh more lite ove' here." Mr. Hopper: Ah, my boy, so you play football. Do you play in the back field? Martin Lowe: No, in the front yard. Willard N.: Terrible golf course. Caddy: This here ain't the course, boss. We been off the course for a half hour. J. Brough: "What's that on your shoulder?" G. Davis: "Dandruff." Brough: "Oh, yes, chips off the old block." Young man, take your hand off my daughter's kneer. Excuse me sir, I was just going .to say what a fine joint you have here.
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