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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 6, February 3, 1932
File 003
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 6, February 3, 1932 - File 003. February 3, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 11, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/129/show/127.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 3, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 6, February 3, 1932 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/129/show/127

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 6, February 3, 1932 - File 003, February 3, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 11, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/129/show/127.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 6, February 3, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 6, February 3, 1932
Contributor
  • Marks, A.
Date February 3, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR Seismology As An Application Of Sound EDITOR'S NOTE: The following article, written by a former student of the Houston Junior college, now attending Texas university, should be of especial interest to all science students. The Cougar will gladly publish any ^.ttier articles, applicable to subjects studied by Junior college students. SEISMOLOGY AS AN APPLICATION OF SOUND Royal E. Neuman The wave-motion of sound plays a great part in electrical appliances, as *we know, and the mechanical crtects of wave-motion also have a place in the great field of seismology. Seismology is the scientific study of earth- *quakes. It is also applied (more commercially) to the location of certain structures of the earth which have proven to be oil producing formations. The theory of seismology is based upon -the wave-motion of sound. For the study of earthquakes, an instrument to record the elastic wave-motion of the earth is always in operation, ready to 'record a quake. Such an instrument is called a sesimograph, and is accompanied by a camera which produces the picture known as the seismogram. Although the wave-mot ion of sound is the most important element of seismology, a time interval must be very • accurately recorded before it is possible to interpret any effect of the sound. In the recording of an earthquake, the time interval is sometimes as great as two or three days, but in the recording of artificial sound wave, caused by the blasting of several hundred pounds of dynamite, the time interval is only a few seconds, this depending mostly upon the distance that Jhe recording station is from the blast point. Another important element is light, for it is the ray of light that is reflected by a mirror in the seismograph onto the sensitized paper in the camera that gives the picture, or the seismogram. - The principal in "covering acreage," m.':! : 1 : M'- i ' ." ! ' : ' j , ' ' •■ ,__,:, ■,,.,, ■ ! ■:| ~- •. -fl ! 1 ■Ml. jrf£ ..,-'• I.C j.f> ' i # : ' s ■ - a ° +A^ j i s j .U- y . ■), f__; j t ; * * :_:.. . _;._...:._r:rz7. 1^ : . 'V ' -', . / Wffi\ '■"-• r.."i.s?tlrfcft'L—■ "'•'- C.r J )■ M- ! i.iii , ■ i i j -■.-?■ as it is termed in oil prospecting, is that the artificial sound source (usually 500 to 1000 pounds of dynamite loaded and electrically exploded about 30 feet under the surface of the earth) be placed in he center or to the edge of the area desired to be discovered, with seismograph recording stations located in a circle around and each at a distance of about six or eight miles from the source of sound or blast point. There are various types of seismographs, two of which are here explained. An alectrical instrument which records the wave-motion of the earth and operates a galvenometor, which moves a small thread whose shadow is cast upon the seismogram to record the wave-motion. Another type is the mechanical instrument which consists of a mass suspended from the frame of the instrument by a very sensitive spring, with a mirror attached to the end of the mass by a hair-spring and fine threads. These mirrors have a focus point of about three feet distance and cast a ray of light onto the seismogram to record the wave-motion of the earth, which makes it possible for the instrument to record with a magnification of over 10,000 times. The sound leaves the source in every direction with a velocity depending upon the formation or layers of earth through which it passes. The sound usually passes through several under- lyers which have velocities such as 6000, 8000, and 10,000 feet per second respectively for the first three under- lyers. In the Gulf Coast country the rays of sound usually penetrate several underlyers before peentratng a salt dome which is one of the best oil producing formations. When the sound ray penetrates a high speed bed known as a fault, or a salt dome, the travel time is shortened. This is graphically shown by a shortest travel time distance curve. The shortest travel time (indicated by the first break of the seis-line on the seismogram) is plotted against the distance in feet, and a 1 mal line is computed. By inspection of the above figure, we see how the rays from the shot-point, located nearly on the surface, penetrate the first four under lyers and also the salt dome with the respective depths and velocities indicated. Some of the rays are immediately reflected and some are refracted through the underlyers and then reflected and recorded back on the surface at the recording stations. The rays indicating salt dome velocity are recorded, in this case, at a distance of 27,000 feet from the shot-point. The graph of the curve is above the surface line and shows the plotted points of the seismogram data. The area under investigation is considered normal unless the points plot off a normal curve or on a high velocity curve. This figure was drawn on the wave front theory, with depths and velocities computed by special formulae. The velocity of sound waves in salt in the neighborhood of 16,00 feet per ^cond, which causes salt dome records to be easily detectable. The distances from the shot-point to the recording stations are either surveyed or computed by the time and velocity of the sound wave through air. Knowing that sound travels through air with a velocity of 1089 feet per second under normal conditions, we can find the velocity of the sound waves by making the corrections for temperature and wind by the formula— V equals (1039 plus 2C plus cw) feet per second where C is the temperature in degrees centigrade, and cw is the component of the wind velocity. The distance is then found by the product of the velocity and the time in seconds recorded for the sound waves to reach the recording station. This method of computing the distance is not accurate to the nth degree, but it has proven to be accurate enough for a high degree of efficiency. This distance is plotted against Jhe travel-time of the sound waves through the earth, and the graphical picture is complete. SWELL STORY Silence. Seventy - seventh street slept. Suddenly some Sam stepped slowly streetward. Sadie Schmaltz slipped softly south. " Something stirred slowly, surely. Sadie stopped, surprised, saw Sam Simpson stairing stanically. Sarator- ially smooth Samuel surged Sadieward. She surrendered. Said Sam, surely, "Some secluded spot, somewhere?" Sadie submitted slowly. Sam, Sadie stepped, soon stopped, sat. Spoke Samuel, "Some swell scenery." "Sure," simpered Sadie. * Sam stretched, limped slowly Sadie- ward, squeezed Sadie. Sadie screamed; skadooed Sam, stood. * Steven Smith, strolling, saw Sadie slap Sam. Steve stepped swiftly, stopped, stood steadily, shook Sam severely. Sam sneered sullenly, swung. Steven stepping sidewise, suddenly socked Sam squarely. Sam slumped sickly, t-sank slowly, signified surrender. "Stand!" shouted Steve. Sam slowly stood somewhat straight. "Scram!" said Steve sharply. Sam stepped _T swiftly. Steve stepped Sadie-ward, softly spoke. Sadie smiled. Steve, Sadie » strolled. Suddenly Steven spoke, "Some secluded spot somewhere?" "Sure!" said Sadie Schmaltz. With Violet cuddling in his arms, He drove his Ford—poor silly, Where once he held his Violet, He now holds his lily. They say that the very last thing Burbank did before dying was to cross a street car track with a baby buggy. Mr. Smith: Have you a little cocktail shaker in your home? - Father: No, he's in college just now. "Don't walk, Hazel—he got you drunk, make him drag you." "Young lady," cautioned the conductor, as she strove to board the train, "don't rush up and down the CAMPUS CUT UPS <§ platform that way. Which end do you want to get on?" Pat I.: "You mind your own business, and I'll get both ends on." The other day I opened our telephone book and found 75 Austins on one page. It was Porta Garrett who loudly did I You were fickle and you \ ; untrue, 1 vey available shows my psychological Haro'ld R.: A mouse crawled into my laundry and died. Thats' probably why. Mr. Birney: When is a girl's weakest moment? Adolph M.: Just after her strongest drink. Gladys H.: For goodness sakes, use two hands. Jonhnie: Can't, gotta drive with one. A broken strap on a swimming suit— Oh, Lady, Godiva! NOTHING MUCH ABOUT NOTHING topped in the middle of the stairs today To talk to my friend, Loraine Romanet. She seemed in a hurry and I asked her, why rush? But all she could do was stand there and gush. I was so inquisitive, that she finally disclosed, Some little nit-wit had just proposed. imagine. So to spread the good news I did try. The first person I told was Mary Jane Fly. She stood there and yelled, yelled right out loud. I was embarrassed and tried hard to But Mary Jane kept laughing all the Among the crowd I saw Nelda Smith, IVo forgotten the boy that she was I immediately called her to one side, And asked her if we shouldn't take Fly for a ride. She said she thought it would quiet her down. So we aired that girl all over town. When we arrived at school once more, Guess who we met—right at the door? swear, Because we had gone off and left her there. But what could we do, she wasn't even around. Stand there and let Mary Jane act a clown? But Portia turned to me and said, "Frankie Pearl, What in the world did you do to this girl?" I explained it to her the simplest I could And let her take it any way she would. She sad she would go and ask Loraine, But, personally, she thought we v all insane Before she could have possibly had time to go We saw Loraine and her grand Romeo. Arm in arm down the hall they strolled. Can't you imagine the lies they told? For anyone knowing Loraine as I Wouldn't believe she had fallen for any guy. I decided I would follow and maybe see What the outcome of this thing would be. The sceond floor, the third floor—a climax soon. I followed them into Miss Ebaugh's Then it dawned on me, strange as it This chump wrote Loraine's English themes. You never played square, you'll age to be 30, my moral age 2, my anatomical age 15, and my physiological age 11. I suppose, however, that you have reference to my chronologi- lage, which is 18. That is so old- fashioned that I seldom think of it any admit. You were a liar and a cheat And a poor sport along with it. You were lazy and you were trifling, But you were sweet, I'll admit; You were spoiled and selfish, And you were just drifting, you But now the tables have changed: I've met someone else, too; And while you've found that you I sing this little song to you: DRIFTING You told me that you loved me; At first I didn't believe you, And then I began to realize That I loved you, too. I fell for your chatter like a fool: I took it hook, lin.e sinker and all: But one thing you forgot to consider Tha t"Pride goeth before a fall." Then you told me that you didn't mean it, That you were only marking time, That you were giving someone else your love, And that I was just wasting n After all, it's you who are the fool: That you'd ever love me you didn't dream: But it's too late now, so don't waste your love Because I, too, was just drifting along with the stream. "JUST AN IDLE ROOMER The stockings were hung By the window with care, They'd been worn for six weeks And they needed the air. Now that that is over, let's get down to the business of dealing out the dirt. Milford Smith {'Windy' to you) was assisting a sweet young- thing into his struggle buggy when she stumbled and almost fell. "I'm sorry," she said, "but these new skirts are so tjght around the bottom." "eYs, I noticed that," replied our hero,' and they fit pretty tight around the ankles, too." We have always wondered just how old our fellow student, George Adams Lefever really is. He seems older than he looks. Having made an "A" on one of our finals, we finally got up Ihe nerve to ask Georgia; we thought he might know. "That is a difficult question," an- j swered G. A., "the latest personal sur- Somebody must have told Harry Phillips that 'Honesty is the best pol- Anyway, the story goes that a friend, in a moment of weakness, took Harry fishing. The two took up positions a few yards from each other and everything was quiet until Harry asked: 'How much do those red and green things cost?" You mean the float?" replied the friend, "about a dime I guess." "Then I owe you a dime," said Harry, "mine has sunk." Warren Lemmon: I kissed Grace on the forehead last night. Gladys Jacobs: What did she say? Warren L-: She called me down. Mary Jane Fly: A penny for your thoughts. P. Marshall: A penny hell. It's the kind of thing you pay $8.80 a seat for on Broadway. Milford Smith: Some of the brothers, when they wake up after a drunk, feel hearty, others heavy, and still others giddy; but, for my part, I feel damn lucky. Dad: I hated to see you come out of that speakeasy the other night, son. Harry Phillips: Yeah, I hated il too, but it was closing time. Melbadel Wright: Doctor, how are my chances? Doc: Oh, pretty good, but I wouldn't start reading any continued stories. "Where did I come from?" asked the rosebud. "The stalk brought you," answered
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