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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 6, February 3, 1932
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 6, February 3, 1932 - File 002. February 3, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/129/show/126.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 3, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 6, February 3, 1932 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/129/show/126

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 6, February 3, 1932 - File 002, February 3, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/129/show/126.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 6, February 3, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 6, February 3, 1932
Contributor
  • Marks, A.
Date February 3, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript T H E C 0 U G A R THE COUGAR Of The Houston Junior College Houston, Texas Established 1928 Published semi-monthly during the college year. Subscriptions, $1 per year. Single copies, 10 cents. EDITORIAL BOARD Managing Editor _ _J., Marks News Editor _ __I_, p. Marshall Assistant News Editors Lucy Tailey Betty Covington Faculty Advisor F. E. Birney DEPARTMENT HEADS Sport Editor ..._ V. F. Harrison Feature Editor James Julian - Literary Editor ..... . Mary Jane Fly Humor Editor _._ Ruth Depperman Exchange Editor. Wenonah Phelps REPORTERS Harry Phillips, Gladys Howard, James Page, N. C. Jensen, Eugene Heard, Margaret Macey, Wilma Lindsay, Wal- say Garrett. PAST EVENTS What Do We Need? You sludents of the Houston Junior college are literally dead on your feet, if the statements of most of the faculty members are to be believed. "Why," you immediately ask, "does this lifeless atmosphere continually hang in a pall around our college? Why do we lack the pep, vim, and vigor that other colleges have" Some of us think that it is because we are a night school. Others place the cause on our lack of proper facilities. Still others say it is because the majority of us work hard in the daytime, and are too tired to show much interest when we come to school. The more athletical-minded propose sports as a remedy, while still more want less home work. Surely one of these complaints is the "key-letter." The question is now "Which one?" We of The Cougar believe that the Junior college should sponsor more athletics. In answer, the faculty will show us how in the past, when the college had a football and a baseball team, only a bare handful of students gave them any support, and theh, it was very seldom. The Cougar proposes that Mr. Dupre let the college have a baseball team and enter it in one of the various city amateur leagues. Talent at the college is not lacking, and it wouldn't hurt to give the proposition a fair trial. Mr. Miner promises to give his hearty support to the project, and all that is needed is the help of the students. And in the words of Cy Shaw, "That's a heckuva lot!" Advice to Freshmen Well, slimes, here you are in college and good luck to you. You need it. Of course you arc high school graduates and know everything there is to know about everything, but here is a few pointers that should help you. (1) Don't buy any elevator tickets. Unscrupulous sophomores like Marion Adams and Fred Aebi have been known to sell elevator tickets to frosh who thought they were as smart as you. (2) Don't lend any money to classmates or fraternity brothers. It doesn't make you popular, it makes a goat out of you. Last year Cy Shaw "heisted" the freshmen out of enough money to buy himself a Ford coupe. (3) Avoid all get - rich - quick schemes. Don't let anyone sell you the school, library or cafeteria. Stay clear of any syndicate gambling organizations. Take the case of Lee Stone. Last September he thought he was a smart freshman, but what happened. He "invested" some money in a Mexican jumping-bean race and the beans turned out to be ordinary kidney beans. Lee was "taken" for the grand sum of three cents, which amount was t pocketed by the shrewd Bill Jeter. ' (4) Don't buy any health cards. Wise sophs like Renfro and Macfee inform some unbeknowing, helpless slime As a special feature for this issue of The Cougar, we are glad to give you a resume of what was happened in the Houston Junior college one year ago. This little column will be especially pleasing to the old dogs who remember the events, and also to the freshmen who will be glad to see the rapid strides that the institution has taken in one year. Our scribe perused and looked all over The Cougar files and the following is what he heads: "Highlights of a Low Year." DRAMA "Nothing But the Truth" was presented by the John E. Bender Dramatic club in the school auditor ii Wednesday night, February 5, 1931. The cast consisted of Warren Lemmon, Phyllis Workman, Jane Witherspoon, Harvey Richards, Kenneth Phillips, Jim Bertrand, Albert Kindel, Gladys Jacobs, Lucille Cafcalas, and Nora Louise Calhoun. The play was directed by H. V. Nigro. COUGAR COLLEGIANS Officers of The Cougar Collegians for the spring term of 1931 are Genevieve Weldon, president; Rena Mai Butler, vice president; Lucille Cafcalas, secretary; Hazel Taylor, treasurer. The new officers will assume their new duties at the next meeting of the sorority. GIRLS' BASKETBALL The co-ed basketball team of the Junior college has experienced a ver;T successful season up to this date. The girls have defeated Humble Oils, Rice institute, Dr. Peppers, Baptist temple, West End Baptist church and several other outstanding teams in the city. The team is coached by Mr. Pease and Mr. French. HASH Flood lights have been installed on the Junior college campus to stop the draining of gasoline from parked cars. Definition of sophomores—a group of old men and women spending anywhere from their fourth to sixth year in college. Houston Junior college leads the state in enrollment with 730 students. Senator Woodul introduces a bill in the state senate providing for state aid to the Junior college. Mid-term students entertained with a dance in the school gym. Junior college debaters enter Texas Junior College Public Speaking association. OUR HONOR ROLL— that they can not use the drinking fountain unless they have a health permit. The slime goes to "Dr." Warren Lemmon who examines them and gives them a health certificate for a small fee. (5) Let no one sell you a pass out rain check. Windy Smith usually sells enough pass out checks to pay his tuition. He tells the new studes they can not get back in the building unless they have one of his rain checks. That's hooey. Don't buy his pass out checks—buy mine. (6) Don't let anyone give you per- ission to "sock" their brother. You might be told that the brother will laugh, but you will be embarrassed when the so-called brother turns out to be a professor. Messrs. Bishkin and Harris look more like studes than they do profs. (7) Don't'lend anyone your tux. It will be returned to you looking shabby and the knees will be bulging so that the next time you wear it, you will look like you have ball-bearing joitns or warts on your knees. (8) When eating in the cafeteria, if you get some sour milk, don't hop up and try to be smart by shouting: 'The contented cows are getting sar- (9) Don't try to advertise that you are a college man. You can easily be dentified by your raccoon coat, slipover sweater, sloucby garterless socks, baggy Omar - the - tent - maker golf knickers and a dull, listless tone in your voice when you recite "Out, out brief candle. Life is but a walking shadow. ..." (10) Be polite. Last year Leon Green was making application in the office for admittance into the H. J. C. The dean leered at Green's illegible writing and said he couldn't read it. Green responded: "H—1, I ain't responsible for your education." EDITOR'S NOTE: Each issue, The Cougar will add names to its Honor Roll. The basis of judgment in naming persons on this roll is their "all aroundness." We will welcome any suggestions. ALLYNE ALLEN Allyne has hopes of becoming a doctor. Her spare moments are devoted to assisting Mrs. Shearer in the management of the library. Her favorite pastimes are reading, swimming, and dancing. When interviewed she admitted her most thrilling experience was being given a pink ticket for making a left-turn on Main street. Allyne coolly confessed that she is in love. This is her second year at Junior College. V. F. (RIP) HARBISON Rip is the sport editor of The Cougar and he is a good one, too. He writes similar to Grantland Eice, but it is generally understood that Rip is the better of the two. He is majoring in journalsm and smokes an odd-shaped pipe, and girls just love a man who smokes a pipe. He is a good basketball player, but being the sport editor he thinks it is a bad policy to mention himself in his writeups. Don't be so modest, Rip, give yourself a break. He enjoys horseback riding as long can manage to stay on lop. BERNICE BRANUM She can always easily be identified by her dazzling pretty red hair. Ber- nice intends to be a concert organist and instructor of music on the piano. She says she knows the meaning of such words as contortuplicate, testace- ology, supralaposarianism, and conta- •. Her hobbies are dancing and swimming. She is a sophomore. MRS. BESSIE EBAUGH Mrs. Ebaugh is now teaching her second year at Junior college. She specializes in freshman English, a hard , which she makes easier and interesting. She received her master's degree from Columbia and bachelor's degree at Tulane. She enjoys reading, and probably has no peer in being well-versed. WALLACE MINER Mr. Miner is one of Junior college's most ardent boosters. No matter what kind of an affair is given—just so long as it is H.J.C.—he always attends. Last year at the football gaems he was always present and cheering the team on. In years gone by he has spent much of his time soliciting adds for The Cougar, for which he received no compensation—save the fact that he was serving the school. He spends his spare time studying international problems and current history. He holds a master's degree from Columbia university. COUGAR CRACKS Have you heard that Nelda Smith, winner of the beauty contest, has signed a contract to be Robert Montgomery's leading lady at $5000 per week, in a picture called Soulmates? Well, we haven't heard it either, but it may be don't know. PUZZLEITUS Gordon Jones is in selling one of these medicines. He calls Swamp Root, Jungle QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS BY BETTY COVINGTON Really it is surprising how curious, or should I say "nosey," the students of H. J. C. are. Questions have been coming in by the thousands, but of it would be an impossibility to print all of them, and since the purpose of this column is to answer the most vital questions, or in other words, give the low down on any problems concerning students and professors "of this college, have chosen the following: 1. Now that leap year is here, will Rena Mai Butler and Clyde Smalley get married? 2. What does Murray Hartt attribute his personality to? 3. Does Windy Smith ever get drunk, or do his plans always fall through? 4. Why is Irwin Eurbank's hair so white? Who furnished the flowers for Christine Fitzgerald at the Fiji Island play given in assembly Wednesday ight? 6. Did George Gayle hurt his back seriously when he fell last Monday ght? 7. What girl will win the beauty contest? 8. Why doesn't Warren Lemon stick , one girl, instead of giving 'em all 9. Why does the faculty censor all the good jokes we attempt to give our readers? 10. Who is the handsome young man who visits Junior college occasionally who resembles Clark Gable in a distant way? Find the answers in the last column. business. H cure-all patent it "Dr. Jones' Strength, Fragrant Odor Brain Tonic." Besides be- idicine that will cure all ills and makes the blood ting like a giant jewsharp, it can be used for a paint remover, after-shaving lotion, mange cure, shoe polish, furniture polish, antifreeze solution, a good substitute for paste, makes fine flavoring for pies and cakes, and if it is put in the water pipes it will keep them from rusting. One bottle of this will grow hair on bald heads, make you pass all your courses, bring you happiness and make you lucky in love. And you don't have to take my word for it—here it written on the bottle label. How many bottles, please? Rosemary Lawrence says she never saw a mosquito cry, but she has seen a moth ball (or maybe bawl). Virginia Cotten thinks its tough to pay 50 cents for steak. It's a lot tougher if you only pay 25 cents, says I. T. B. Ellis: Avis Parks; T. B. E.: "A 'Do you drink?" 'That's my business." i, a professional." There never has been an absent- minded prof who forgot to flunk someone. From a newspaper account of an auto wreck: "The accdent bruised her somewhat and hurt her otherwise.' She was only a pugilist's step-child, but she knocked 'em cold. "Hard-boiled guys," asserts Evelyn Cochran, "are usually about half baked." One way to keep your wife at home -nail her to the floor. Jacob Abraham Weinstein is going to change his name. The other day he a court room and the judge lined him $50 for perjury. A local woman spent $50 last year for corsets. What a waist. Arthur Burns is so mean that he would put a tack in an electric chair. If a father sends his first son to college, that is his duty. If he sends his second son he must be crazy. Edmundo "Moose" Gonzales thinks it is better to have loved and lost than to be a hen-pecked husband. L. B. Manry wouldn't marry a girl for money—he's afraid he will lose his amateur standing. A. Marks, our blossoming cartoonist, recently entered an art contest. He says no one won—it was a draw. The co-ed who smokes: "Let the rest of the world go buy." She was only a life savers daughter, but she knew all the dives in town. One way to become a good judge of human nature is to patronize the cafeteria. Most of the students act there like they do at home. t Correct this sentence: "My pupils," said the English instructor, "usually prefer to read classic literature." Alas! You can tell the extent of a student's ambition by his punctuality. The modern co-ed: Howling because the lessons are so long; complaining because her boy friend leaves early. But if a good journalist is one who appreciates humor, why doesn't an editor reflect on "his humor" in ad- A most astounding problem has come before the students of Junior college. It was discovered that a physics class back in 1880 left a question concerning the relativity of time to time unsettled! It is well known that Mr. Schumann never leaves any doubt in anybody's mind about anything (oh, no), so certainly this question must be settled immediately. A cat had been much praised on the beauty of his claws, so deciding that he would show that the claws were good for other things than being looked at, he took it upon himself to demonstrate their power by climbing a glass pole. He started early one morning to accomplish the difficult task, and by dint of much effort, he struggled up three feet of the way during the day, then took time out for the night. But poor kitty; during he night he slipped back two feet, and so, awoke the next morning to find that he was only one foot up the pole. Slightly discouraged, but determined, he struggled on and cilmbed up three more feet during the second day, and again slipped back two feet every night. Now thd unsettled queston is: If the pole is 10 feet high, how many days will it take the cat to reach the top? See if you can answer the question for that old physics class of 1880, and if you can, write it on a piece of paper with your name attached, and put it in Mr. Birney's box at the office, from where it will be forwarded to every member of that aforesaid class. I regret to say that those who hand- 1 in the correct solution to the last puzzle forgot to sign their names to their answers, consequently I can not give the names here. Don't forget your ne this time, and hand in a solution somebody can see that you are among the smart people at Junior college. The correct answer to the last puzzle—Smith painted six more posts than Jones did. ANSWERS TO THE QUESTION BOX 1. I hardly think so. Rena Mai is quite bashful. 2. He reads the Ballyhoo. 3. The cork sometimes pops off and hits him, and in that case he does. 4. He uses Jean Harlowe's recipe. 5. Jamail & Jamail, "Fruits and vegetables of all kinds." 6. He didn't fall on his back. 7. The most beautiful girl. 8. His opinion is that one "Lemon squeeze" is sufficient. 9. They are very selfish, because after reading the jokes themselves—to - with the students. . "Cotton" Williams. There seems to be a theory prevalent among some educators that pedigree plays its part in one's career; and that one can not rise above his ancestors. Thus, if your father is a janitor, all you can do is to get a brush and besin to scrub. The young law student, searching the library for a volume called "Syllabus," can, no doubt, make progress by consulting the dictionary. Consideration pupils have for one another, warrants silence in the library. A test: Something dreaded, but for which no precautions are taken. A good faculty is a body composed of philosophers, diplomats and admin- istrants. The goat's not my favorite mammal; Mr. Ghandi dotes on it I know. 's milk is nutritious, And doubtless delicious, But I don't like the critter's B. O. Pat Foley: There are several things can always count on. Malcolm P.: What are they? Pat F.: My fingers. Jean W.: I'll have you know I'm related to the Boones. Porita G.: Now I remember, your grandmother's name was Bab. Old Lady: I wouldn't cry like that, my little man. Boy: Cry as you damn please, this is my way.
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