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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930
File 004
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930 - File 004. October 15, 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/124/show/123.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 15, 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930 - File 004. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/124/show/123

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930 - File 004, October 15, 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/124/show/123.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 2, October 15, 1930
Contributor
  • Nesmith, R. Willard
Date October 15, 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript THE COUGAR STERLING BUYS FIRST TICKET Ross Sterling, Democratic gubernatorial nominee, is sliown purchasing the first season ticket io Houston Junior College football games. A Cougar Collegian Committee is shown with Mr. Sterling. Courtesy of Houston Post-Dispatch. RECORDS SHOW HIC. ENROLLMENT DRAWN FROM ENTIRE STATE Many lnstituitons Represented In Official 1930 Records Released by Registrar's Office: Record Completed. Records compiled by the registrar's office show that the Houston Junior College draws its student body from many schools throughout the entire state. It Is evident that the fame of the local school has reached statewide proporiions and that the state as well as Houston has been awakened to the fact that the local Junior College not only has the largest enrollment in the state but that the courses offered here are very desirable. Among the students representing Texas colleges are: Carey Chambers and Blanche Bybee, Sam Houston State Teachers' College: Katherine Bank, Margarette Alford, John Brow- der and Suzanne Crawford, Texas University; Lester Richardson, Howard Payne College; Elizabeth Sinclair, Texas Christian University; Norelle Glover and Anna Lou Elliot, Westmoreland College: Dan Hogler and Archie Irwin. Texas Agricultural and Mechanical College; Mildred Cramer and Mabel Clair Brown, College of Industrial Art»; lone Brown, Stephen F. Austin College; Hazel Adams, Southern Methodist University; Geneva Card, San Marcos Teachers' College; Beulah Bowling, Janice Berry, Evelyn Eply, Rice Insti- <ute: Magdalena Kastuer and Alvena Liindsey, Baylor .University; Bernard Collins. St. Thomas College; Granville Elder, St. Mary's College; Katherine EUot, North Texas State Teachers' College; David Cotenach, San Antonio Junior College, and Xelwayn Turner, Lou Morris College. From distanl colleges, there is Roy Journeay. Newcomb College; Everett Kendall, University of California; Herman Myers, Georgia School of Technology; David Fnrnian. Assumption College; Arthur Pease, Fairmount College; E'ga Schaeffer. Drake University; P. Singleton, Phoenix Junior College: Harold Steele, University of Idaho; Pearl Taylor, Union College; Lloyd Williams. Baldwin-Wallace College; Wilton Cohen, Art Students League; Ruth Fain, Aa- bama University: Elizabeth Arring- ton, Brennan College; Guy Berryhil1, George Washington University: Leon Bupe. Denver University; Stuart Campbell, Louisiana State University, and Dorothy McGrow. Arkansas State University. -COLLEGIANSTO STAGE TICKET SALES DRIVE Cougar Collegians. Houston Junior college girls pep-club, sold the first season ticket for Junior college football games to R. S. Sterl'ng, Democratic gubernatorial nominee. To begin the intensive drive the Collegians are staging. Hazel Taylor, presiden tof the club, and five members. Llewlyn Ross, Maurine Edm'n- ster Celia Lasky, Helen Davis and Margaret Iloyett, called on Mr. Ster- j ling last week, and succeeded in making the first sale. The pep-club is sponsoring Ihe sale cf tickets for the games, and though their campaign is not yet In full ! swing, due to the fact that each Individual member has not yet been supplied with tickets, it is bel'eveu at least, a thousand tickets will be sold. Several groups will be detailed lo canvass the downtown office districts and "t is hoped the merchants will co-cperate in Ihe purchase of season tickets. Heme connections will also be depended upon to buy many of the tickets, according to the Collegians. Enrolling from out-of-town high schools arc Sammie Fowler, Lexington: Louis Gunnels, Rosenberg; John Heaner. Lufkin; Walter Halliday. Lovelady; Wilson Hunt, Cedar Bayou; '■ Irene Johnson. El Campo: Claude .lustvs. j lano; Gladys Liestman Alief: Orlo McGeath, Port Huron; Oro Morgan, Galena Park; Virginia Northington, Wharton; Albert Bush and Larry Perez, Richmond; Mayes' Sparks, Rockdale: Ema Tindall. Palestine; Goldie Wasser. Beaumont; Wolfeau, Goose Creek; Frank Car-, ter, Central High. Fort Worth; Zal-. lab Belle Copeland, Rusk; Le Roy; Darley, Central High, Clearwater,; Florida; Mack Datigherty, Angleton; . Klizabeth Dickenson. Bryan; Justine! Dubendorf, Fremont High, Oakland. California; Connie Fowler. Murphy i High. Mobile, Alabama. Junior College welcomes Zina C.ros:< from University of Vienna, Europe. COMING EVENTS October 18 —Temple Junior College at Houston. October 25 — S a m Houston State Teachers' College—Second Team at Houston. October 25-30 — Cruiser Houston—Port celebration. November 1-Sam Houston State Teachers at Huntsville— College-Reserves. November 6—Open Forum Debate at the City Auditorium. Subject is Prohibition. Clarence I Darrow and C!arence True Wil- l son. November 7—Victoria Junior College at Houston. November 11—Allen Military | Academy at Bryan. November 11—Open Forum | Lecture "The Rise of Humanism" by Charles Francis Potler, at Sidney Lanier School. November 15—Lutheran Junior College at Houston. November 21—Blinn Memorial Junior College at Brenham. November 27-29—Texas Stat6 Convention at Houston. One Of the noted lecturers is the explorer, Vllhjalmir Stefanssorts who was one of the leaders of the Anglo-American expedition to the Arctic in 1905 to 1912. November 27 — Thanksgiving Day—A Holiday. All on to Austin to see the struggle between the University of Texas and A, and M. Texas Vniv. Battles Oklahoma Vniv. Texas University is looking forward to their Hit with Oklahoma University on October 18. .Both varsities will have their bands at the game, special trains will run, and eager students will be on hand to root for the home team. H. J. C. students—true sport fans, that they are—will wait anxiously for news of the game. OPEN FORUM STARTS NOVEMBER 6 WITH GOOD PROGRAM The foundation of culture is knowledge. The only genuine knowledge derives from a free interchange of ideas. The opportunity for such interchange provided by the famed Forum of ancient Athens contributed greatly to the brilliance of Greek culture. The Houston Open Forum, founded four years ago, endeavors to perform a similarly important service to this community ... by bringing for all who will to hear distinguished men of thought, of action, of affairs, of science. This service, in a nation and a time which has tended toward intellectual conventionality, even stagnation, every intelligent citizen who would see his olty progress in culture as in material thngs, is certain to appreciate. An Eastman, a Thomas, a Russell, a Lindsey, and now a Darrow—here are men whose names are known the world over. The Open Forum has given Houston the chance to see and converse With them in the flesh, to hear ideas, to listen to argument, to gather information which would otherwise have never been available . . save from remote printed pages. Often startling, always stimulating, tbey have generated in the minds of thousands of Houstonians the finest form of mental activity. Almost without execeptlon they have been questioned avidly, intelligently . Freedom and courage have been the keynotes of Open Forum programs— as scarce needs be said. The Forum has never required of audiences or speakers any sort of conformity, preferring to assume that its public is able to sort out its own conclusions. Any other policy would have been in violation of the entire spirit of the movement. Now the Forum needs your help to carry ou. For the season of 1930- 1931 it has again arranged for men of similar authority in their several fields. The varied services involved in the conduct of this Forum are contributed by Houstonians who believe in the Institution, leaving only actual expenses—speakers fees, rentals, printing, postage, and incidentals to be met. These must be provided by voluntary contributions—basket collections and yearly subscriptions to the Hous ton Open Forum, the maximum subscription being 150. Speakers 1930-1931 Thursday, November 6, 1930: Debate—Prohibition, Clarence Darrow and Clarence True Wilson; at the City Auditorium. Tuesday, November 11, 1930: "The Rise of Humanism," Charles Francis Potter; at Sidney Lanier School. Tuesday, December 2, 1930: "Psychology in the Melting Pot," Charles G. Obermeyer; at Sidney Lanier School. Tuesday, December 9, 1930: "All the World and Ourselves," Dr. Frank Bohi;; at Sidney Lanier School. Tuesday, January 27, 1931, "Fads in Quackery," Dr. Morris Fishbein; at Sidney Lanier School. Tuesday, February 17, 1931, "Psychology of Happiness," Prof. Walter B. Pitkin; at Sidney Lanier School. Tuesday, March 17, 1931: "The United States and Mexico," Jose Kel- ley; at Sidney Lanier School. Tuesday, March 24. 1931: "Subject Not Chosen," Dr. William Dodd: at Sidney Lanier School. Officers J. J. Carroll, president; Dr. Curtis H. Walker, honorary vice-president; |Dr. Charles Morris, first vlce-presi- ,dent; Lewis Fogle. second vice-president; Miss Ramona Brady, secretary: Dr. Ray K. Daily, treasurer. Executive Board: the officers and T. J. Caldwell, Miss Julia Ideson. Chas, Murphy, James L.,Shepherd, Jr. Allen Peden, Harry D. Freeman. "Where Quality, Service and Experience Count" BILAO'S SHOE SHOP Special Atention Paid to Ladies' Shoes A TRIAL. IS ALL I ASK PHONE PRESTON 7910 1108 Capito' Avenue School Supplies Printing—Lithographing Engraving—Embossing Office Supplies STANDARD Printing & Litho. Co. Phone Preston 3848 1207-1211 CAPITOL AVENUE (Opposite Post Office) 1930 Xmas Cards Now Ready for Selection ORDER EARLY "A PLEASURE TO SHOW YOU" ^iLsorJSSSCb. i ^laliOiienPrinltrs.tttfrdvgrsOlficeOulfillfrs jjjj" Two Stores 508 Fannin 1103 Mai W. C. Munn Co. COLLEGE WARDROBES ARE NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT A SWEATER AND SKIRT College girls are famous bud- geteers. Naturally they turn to these smart sweaters and skirts. In solid colors or mixtures— j skirt and sweaters to match or [ contrasting colors. Sweaters Skirts - - 1.98 to 7.98 3.98 to 5.98 Third Floor-MUNN'S WOOD & PURDY SPORTING GOODS COMPANY Athletic Outfitters Felt Emblems and Pennants Made to Order Hunting and Fishing Supplies Phone Capitol 2613 1317 Capitol Avenue POST OFFICE PHARMACY 1124 Capitol Avenue Phones: Fairfax 1480-3820-6783 OHT LUNCHES — SPECIAL TOASTED SANDWICHES CHILI AND TAMALES Prompt, Efficient Service to Students On Main at Rusk SMART CLOTHES FOR WELL-DRESSED BOYS YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN
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