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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930
File 003
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930 - File 003. October 15, 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/124/show/122.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 15, 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/124/show/122

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930 - File 003, October 15, 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/124/show/122.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 2, October 15, 1930
Contributor
  • Nesmith, R. Willard
Date October 15, 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE CO UGAR "We all wants you to come to our party tonight, Mandy," ■'Ah cain't, Sambo, Ah Is got a case of diabetes." "Come along anyways, Mandy, and bring it wld ya. Those niggers'll drink anything!" Isaac: You should pull the curtains down ven you kiss your wife. I saw you last night. Abia: Ha! the choke's on you. I vasn't home last night. A young man was lying on the operating table awaiting i Doctor (to attendant): Bring in ethyl chloride. Patient (jumping up). No, Doctor, don't bring a woman in here. Oh. tell me, please, for goodness' sake, Must night fall, because day breaks? Must fleas fly because flies flee? Must ships have eyes when they go to sea? Must pens be pushed and pencils lead? Must there be springs in tbe ocean bed? Hut, most of all, I want an answer, Is a busy-body a hula dancer? ' said old Link, "business is good. Ah bought a pig for ten dollars, traded the pig for a calf, traded the calf for a bicycle, and sold the bicycle for ten dollars." "But yo' don' makes nothin'. Link!" "Sho 'nough, but look at the business Ah been in!" Little Jack Horner stood on a corner Watching the girls go by; He tipped his lid to a cute little kid, And she gave him a sock in the eye. A sock on in the eye! the foot is worth two Soph: dome on, take a bath, and I'll get you a date. Frosh (cautiously): Yeah, and suppose you don't get the date? "I seem to have run out of gas," he said and rnutered to himself, "Here is where I have to do 'some fast wort." The girl's face, small and white, was turned to his, and eyes glowed dizzily from beneath heavy lids. Her red lips were parted and she sighed faintly— He bent over her— And then— He yanked out her tooth—he was her dentist. During the World War a very patriotic old lady was passing a farmer's barn one day. She observed a young farmer bby milking a cow; be looked old enough to be in the army, and sho was indignant at finding him on the farm. "Why aren't you at the front?" asked the indignant old lady. "Cause there ain't no milk at that end." He: "If you keep on looking at me like that I'm going to kiss you." She: "Well, I can't hold this expression much longer." Country Girl: "Out here on the ranch we ride horses bareback." City Girl: "Oh, I should think the sun would blister you horribly." "What is that?" asked the condemned murderer, pointing to the death warrant in the wardens hand- "That? Oh, that's a noosepaper." "How did you happen to take that poison? Didn't you read the sign on the bottle? It said 'Poison'." "Yassah, but I didn't believe it.' "Why not?" "Cause right underneaf It was a sign which said, 'Lye'." Housewife: Don't bring me any more of that horrid milk—it is positively blue. Milkman: Can't help it, lady; it's these long, dull evenings as make the cows depressed.—Rice Owl. Th young woman had just returned to her rural home after an extended visit to the city. She was exhibiting the contents of her wardrobe to her mother who had bought her clothes for forty years at the general store. "And these," said tbe young lady holding up a delicate silken garment, "are tedd es." "Teddy's? You don't say. Young men certainly are different from whal they used to be!"—Orange Peel. Little Rollo (aged seven): 'Mama, where did I come from?" Mama: "Why, the stork brought you." L. R.: "Where did you come from?" The stork brought me, NIGHT FOOTBALL INAUGURATED AT JUNIOR COLLEGE School Board Decision Brings About Speedy Erection of Lights; Spirit of Co-operation Prevails. With the click of a switch, night football practice was inaugurated at Houston Junior college, Tuesday night, September 30 ,at 8:30 o'clock. The initial night football practice found about 38 prospects ou the field. The noctural practices w II enable more aspirants to turn out, because any students work during tbe day. Night practice will also give the Cougars a better chance to bid for football honors, since it affords long- ind peppier pract'ces. he Houston Junior college is indebted to Mr. William Kirkland, vice president of the school board, for the spot-lights on the field. He has shown lots of interest In the Junior college, and especially the athletic teams. Strange Desert DWeUer APPOINTMENTS MADE Makes Friends ot Reptiles „..„m„ To Ward off Loneliness m OFFICIAL POSTS A strange desert dweller who makes friends of reptiles to ward off loneliness was encountered by a Houston Junior college student during a vacation trip last summer. Following is his account of it. loo." L, R.: 'And where did Grandma and Grandpa come from?" Mama: "The stork brought them, too." Little Rollo then sat down at his little green desk with ducks painted all over it. and began to write. "In so far as I hae been able to ascertain, the origin of myself and family for the past two generations has been of a most unusual nature!" -—Gargoyle. She: Say something soft and sweet to me, dearest. He: Lemon custard pie. FRESH IDEAS My dear, last night I got a thrill And here my story I will spill. I dated with a sophomore lad, A lowly fish like me. Too bad They know so much and me so dumb— The dumber the belter tbo' for some. 1 wonder what it's all about; Just give me fme and I'll find out. Now, could he neck? Well, I should Say And in the most surprising way— He didn't hurt, he didn't paw, 'Twas method rare without a flaw, He must have practiced nights and nights. Or course he's well within his rights, But I was bored to tears my dear. I'll never fal for him, I fear. But, Oh, I've met a fish divine! I think he'll take up all my time. He's handsome, tall and very dark- - I met him out in Hermann park. He was so very crude and slow; He learned it in high school, I know. He didn't even hold me right; He grappled me, my hat took flight; My hair came down, my lips were smeared— I opened an eye and out 1 ppered. And then I knew I had my wish— I'd found a cave man in a "fish." ON'30 COUGAR STAFF Responsible Positions Filled By Experienced Journalists; Paper to Be Entered In Several Contests. All day long my friend and I had motored over the white, hot desert un- blazing sun that ran the thermometer up into the twenties above the hundred mark. A slight breeze fanned our cheeks, but it brought no relief; it was like the breath of a furnace. To the right of the trail, shimmering in the sun as far as the eye could reach, were the calm, lifeless waters of the Salton Sea. Not a living creature was in sight; truly it wag a land of death. "What I can't understand, is how the forty- niners got across to California with their ox carts," remarked my com- ; panion as he reached for the thermos I jar of ice water. At the close of the day's nil the sun looking like an angry, red ball I of the & of fire just ready to slip over the ' ior year. horizon, we drew up and stoppe dat a I During his freshman year at Texas lonely filling station—a shack, a gas ; A. and M. Mr. Nesmith was a regular service pump, and a few1 stinted palm contributor to the Battalion and was trees giving scanty shade. : to have held an important office on "We'd like tod camp here for the the staff of that paper had he return- night, if you don't mind," I said to ed to school in 1929. He is now em- the under-sized pleasant-faced man ; ployed as a Chronicle sports reporter, who appeared at the door of the shack, j Everet Kendall has been appointed "Sure," he said heartily. "If it wasn't I business manager of the Cougar and for my pets, and my trips down to will aid the editor materially in the Yuma for water and supplies, and you preparation of the paper editorially, tourists, I'm afraid I'd get just a little The Junior College student-body will welcome announcements made public today by Fred R. Birney and Wallace H, Miner, faculty advisors of the school-paper, of the appointment members to fill important of- the editorial and business staff of the Cougar. The important office of editor-in- chief has been filled by R. Willard Nesmith who has had much experience in the publication of sehool- papers and various other publications. Ith was ed tor and founder Mercurlous, Reagan High School's official paper. He was also editor of the Pennant, the yearbook institutin, during his sen- bit lonesome." , Kendall has had a great deal ( xperience in journalistic work i "Pets—what sort of pets do you , °\h™[ citiea_aml *» P!.rt^ula.r'y_ Ca.?a' have out here?" I asked. "Come and see for yourselves," be replied as he in regard to the publication of i school sheet. Miss Maurine Reach is to occupy here were "some" enclosures I the Position of issue editor in which capacity he w.l direct the assignment of stories for each succeedng issue. Miss Keach is thoroughly capable of directing the reportorial staff cf the Cougar, Misses Margaret Boyett, Feme Sweeney, and Lois Duff have been appointed heads of the various editorial departments. Announcements will be made later concerning appointments to other offices. Fred R. Birney has announced led the way to the rear o fthe shack I where made of finely woven wire. Inside we could see several giant rattlesnakes which regarded us steadily with their venomous looking, beady eyes. --"Of course them snakes are all right, but they ain't the kind of pets that you get real chummy with, like Oscar here, for instance," said the man as he picked.up a fat lizzard about afoot Jong, and began to stroke it. "I first intended to feed Oscar to the snakes. But when I put him in the pen, he just lay down and shut his eyes,'and ! ,hat he J',S such confidence in the looked sort of helpless and pitiful In I ,,ew staff t,lat he wiU make the ne^s- there with them old rattlers, that ! sary Prel)arat^s to enter the Cougar "i various competitions and contests here the local paper will be In corn- He: Something seems to he wrong with the engine, it— She: Don't be foolish; wait until ; we get off tbe main road. Shakespearean student speaking to a new librarian: "Do you have Lamb's Tales." New Librarian: "You might try a meat market." Reeky: "Do you really lofe me, Isaac?" Isaac: "Vot a kvestion. Doant I let you sit on my lep and spoil the creases from my pents?" A knowing friend tells us that Ten Nights in a Barroom Is the story of ;\ Scotchman waiting for someone to buy the drinks. Visitor: "We're getting up a raffle for a poor old man. Won't you buy a ticket, my dear?" Genevieve Weldon: "Mercy, no! What would I do with him if I won Mrs.: "I'm getting stouter all the time." Mr.: "Yes, I little realized when I married you that I was getting you on the Installment plan." It was a fine, sunshiny Sunday morning and Pat had brought his shaving tools out on the porch. Mrs. McGinnis looked over the "Sure, Mrs. Murphy, does your old man shave on the outside?" "And what is bothering you?" asked Mrs. Murphy. "Did you think he wuz fur lined?" Sue Sellingslo: "I'm so mad I could quit speaking to you forever." Kent Schwartz: "Well, get a little bit madder." Solicitor for Charity Organization. "What do you do with your cast-oft* clothing?" Mr. Russ: "Why, ah, I hang them un carefully and go to bed. Then In the morning I put them on again." Opal Beane claims most girls have a sinking feeling whenever they see a good looking life guard. Terry Russ: "Why so gloomy, old Joe Peabody: "Just heard my uncle has cut me out ot his will. He's altered it five times in the last two years." Terry Russ: "Probably a fresh-heir fiend." Milford Smith: "Be careful. I juat hit my crazy hone." Joe Windship' "Don't worry. Your head can stand a little thing like that." TRIALS OF PARENTHOOD Spring, glorious spring, bringing that delicious inner urge to do things, led young Mrs. Marston to her flower beds, where she began busily digging and planting, thinking of the riot of color her flower beds would be in a few short weeks. Her sturdy son of five, busily engaged In tormenting a legless grasshopper, was also doing some thinking about the lovely new baby sister his playmate had received. "Mother," said he, "Where do little baby sisters and brothers come from?" Mrs. Marston, Inspecting the black loam and the packets of seed at her side, said: "Why, Tommy, babies are grown In beautiful gardens, like the roses and pansies." Forgetting the child's question, she handed him a small packet of seed and said. "Here, Tommy, old fellow, plant a garden over there by Mother's rockery; that Is just the place for it." Tommy diligently prodded, planted and grubbed in the soil until he was called in and put Into bis comfy bed. Bright and early the following morning he hurried to his garden patch and gazed with horrified eyes at an ugly toad who croaked at him from a dew moistened rock. Finally, with a deep sigh, Tommy said, in anguish: "You ugly beast! If I wasn't your daddy, I'd stomp you!" Melfonl Smith: "I think she's as pretty as she can be." Frances E. Smith: "Most girls Marjorie Boyett: "Don't you know there are germs in kissing." Bill Hill; "Say, girlie, when I kiss, I kiss bard eniugh to kill the germs." I took pity on him and rescued him. He's been following me around the i shack ever since." After a few questions we discovered that Oscar belonged to that family of reptiles known locally as "chuckwallas" which is harmless and which has, as nearly as any reptile can have, the characteristics of a warm-blooded household pet. "You see it was like this," continued Oscar's master, "the doctors sent me out here for my health years ago. At first it was pretty tough. But now, with Oscar and my other pets, and my work to supply the tourists, I'm kept busy and contented. petition with school papers from all parts of the state and nation. LECHENGER DISPLAYS SILVER SERVICE FOR CRUISER'HOUSTON' Beginn'ng Thursday morning, Sep- ember 9, the beautiful silver service o be presented to the cruiser 'Houston" will be on exhibit at the Come to think of it, I wouldn't trade j store of L. Lechenger, Post-Dispatch places with anybody that Uvea in a | Building, for a I'ml ted period of time. dty." A little later we spread our blankets ,on the White sand under stars that were as bright as moonlight. The breeze that rustled the palms had lost lost its heat and was now delightfully cool and refreshing. "After all, success isn't in having a lot of things," remarked my companion, sleepily, as he settled himself in his blankets. "Success is contentment. If this desert man's contented with what he's got. then I've got no kick coming." His voice trailed off Into slumber. "I guess you're right, at that," said I, as I raised on one elbow to hear the wail of a coyote far off in the dim, star-lit distance." SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS CHOSEN FOR ACTIVE YEAR As a result of the sophomore class meeting held October 8, four new officers for the class of 1931 were elected. Robert McCullough, rreshman president of last year, was re-e'e: ted to the leading office of his class; B 11 JeL.r. vice president; Adele Drenkle, The elaborate service consists of 56 pieces of solid silver, hand- wrought and hanu-etched. The design is influenced by old Spanish m's- sions of Texas, the magnolia, official flower of the city of Houston, and General Sam Houston, for whom the city vas named. A staff of silver ar.isans have been at work on ;t in tbe factory of the International Silver Company at Wallingford, Connecticut, for nc:irly a year. As an example of craftsmanship in precious metal, it is outstanding. Some conceding it to be ' the finest silver service ever presented to an American ship. This exhibit will, appeal to every Houstonian for one can not help be- ;ng proud of the fact that one of Uncle Sam's new fighting craft has honored him by taking the name cf his city. By the courtesy of L. Lechenger, through whom the silver service was purchased, and the cruiser Houston committee, the public is prvilej-ed to see the service. popular and pretty young co-ed, elected secretary; Sterling Jacl was returned treasurer,
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