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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930 - File 002. October 15, 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/124/show/121.

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(October 15, 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/124/show/121

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930 - File 002, October 15, 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/124/show/121.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 15, 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 2, October 15, 1930
Contributor
  • Nesmith, R. Willard
Date October 15, 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR The COUGAR Of The Houston i $1.04 per year. Business Manager ... .. . Everett H. Kendall Circulation Manager .... Harry Seaman Faculty Advisors ... Fred R. Rlmoy. Wallace H. Miner Sports . ..Martin Lowe Featurt- Literary .. Exchange Alumni .. Zelda Osborne Margaret Boyett Reporters: L'ewellyn Ross, Lucille Cafcalas, Harold Wood, Frances Baty, Evelyn Cochran, Gordon Davis, Ruth Dermody, Lois Duff, Maurine Edminster, Milton Cohen, Scott Hild, Ethel Mercer, Loi8 Harrison, Beatrice Hamilton, Montford Inman, A. C. Irwin, Fay Laurence, Pauline Ault, Opal Beane, Chap- pell Freeman, Rubye Tunnell, Jane Wltherspoon. THE FUTURE LOOKS BRIGHT A great college in a great town—that is the present situation with regard to the Houston Junior college. Let us see what some of the reasons are for this state of affairs. Houston, in ten years, has grown to the importance of a world port—the seventh in importance in the nation. Its development, from a rather insignificant, medium sized town to the city it now is, has attracted the attention of the nation and the world. Houston Junior college is a fitting institution for such a location. Five years ago it was merely a dream in the minds of some of Houston's most progressive citizens. Today it has an enrollment of over seven hundred students. Its instructors are of liberal training and wide professional experience. Its students are mainly purposeful young people who are earnestly preparing to take responsible places in the commonwealth. Manv of them are employed outside of school hours, thus earning their way as they progress with the college. Already there is a movement under way to make the school a standard four-year college, a thing that Houston needs. With such a school and in such a city, the students may well feel a deep sense of pride. During the growth of young colleges—as with young people—there is a period of adjustment, of seeming awkwardness; a vigorous time of adolescence just prior to the coming of a more mature life and judgment. Houston Junior college could scarcely be expected to avoid such a period of growth; yet, due to the skillful understanding direction of its leaders, it is passing through its "growing pains" with comparative ease. Adjustments are made with little friction, and the rapid growth presages a quick blossoming to maturity. The future for Houston Junior college is bright. Believe It-- R. Knot GERMANY IS FREE1 Wedding Bells SAYS HiC STUDENT: STUDYING THERE FOOTBALL * THE GAME Autumn leaves have begun to fall and the air has that faint tinge which puts real manhood's red blood a-tingling. It is the time of year for one of the best loved of all national games. The dull thud of the pigskin on booted toe and the meeting of human flesh on flesh resounds from all the playgrounds of the nation. Football is a game liked or loved by all classes and ages. It is loved by those who love it with the fervor and devotion of a strong heart. The game is played for the honor and the glory bestowed upon the players by a sophisticated public or because of an intense, overpowering attraction that amounts to worship on the part of those intimately associated with it. This sport of sports, which comes upon us in the' autumn like a breath out of the age of jousts, trysts, and battles of blood, is replete with thrills that hold the spectator spell-bound until the final whistle is blown and sends him on his way happy with the sheer joy of living. • JUST TALK— (Continued from page 1) this year, and how they are swinging into l'ne like real freshmen? They are good sports, and the sophs are expecting a lot fnom them. Keep the right spirit, freshmen! The assemblies have been a little noisy, but what can you expect right here at the first with everyone still trying to get adjusted and with several hundred freshmen learning something new? Give us a chance to show that we are willing to abide by the college rules! The "fish", the "sophs" and the "profs" are a great lot. There is a lot to do, but watch our smoke! We're all going to put H. J. C. on the top where it ought to be. —Opal Beane. Opal is just bubbling over with enthusiasm and energy and optimism. Let's all get a little of this real, honest-to-good ness joy out of living and being college students. It's much more fun than being dogmatic old dogs who know only that the sun rises and sets, 'cause really it doesn't! SPONSORS— (Continued from page 1) and is looking forward especially to the annual freshman ball inaugurated by last year's freshmen. Mr. Wallace H. Miner, history in structor, is to sponsor the sophomores for the fourth consecutive year, Mr. Miner real'zes that sophomores are fulL-fiedged colege students and that they have won for themselves a respect and admiration that is deserved. .Mi. Miner says that each succeeding year sees the sopl oiimrt class contribute more than its share to the building up of a background for the future college of Hot.-Mn. This yeVr's class will be no exception, says the sponsor of the class. FAMOUS COWBOY BAND PLAYS DALLAS STATE FAIR OCTOBER llth-19th The Simmons University Cowboy band of Abilene, Texas, will play at the State Fair in Dallas during the rodeo that will be staged at the Stadium. The rodeo opens October 11th and closes October 19th, furnishing a solid week of thrills. The Cowboys have toured England, Italy, France and Germany, where they gave a series of concerts. The Cowboy band plays all the large rodeos of Texas and is often invited to attend national functions. During the summer just past they serenaded the President on the lawn of the White House. The band played at the rodeo given in Houston on May 10th to 18th. Professor Wiley is director of the organization. "LULU" PHELPS, what happened to the little auburn "calf'catcher?" Johnnie Frank seems to have a personal interest in it at present, judging from the "For Sale" sign. Anyway, we like Packards better. Boastful is dapple CECILE TAYLOR over her anticipation of the R- S. Sterling for Governor campaign.— (Paid political advertisement.) A deluge of tears falling from the uncrowned brow—or is it crowned? —of beautiful but — pretty (fooled ya!) MAURINE EDMINSTEK. Some wise bird has it that TERRY RUSS is the "Dux vir facti." (Latin books may be procured from Professor South or thereabouts—while the brushing will have lo be done by- no, not Fuller—but by thee). Proud indeed is "SOAP" McGINTY over his immaculate pose upon emerging from grammar school—and long panis, too! Cover my optics! Erratic and winning are BETTY GROENLUND and* NORA LOUISE CALHOUN, in no hurry lo get to class. There's ALBERT KINDEL, the "chic" little slime from Rice, gloating over the blondes, brunettes, and red-heads he rated "fish nite." Sophisticated and cheerlu I— HELEN LEE DAVIS (in the flesh— or is it Hash) bating the hook—and' there seems to be a regular catch, Latest Bulletin: If all the admirers of "CY" SHAW were ostracized, Houston wouldn't be Texas' largest city! Don't crowd, girls! HOWARD "DOUG" GRAHAM with his persuasive smile, masticating his gum and impatiently waiting for seven bells or is it belles? Did'ja ever notice that darlyn' semi-blond from Louisiana whose interest is now centered in the one and only HARVEY RICHARDS? Well, we found out the name—and Its ELEANOR STANDFIELD. Disappointed is IRENE CAFCALAS over the latest attachment— or it it a fixture?—yet in duo they meander through the halls—gassoo! Law has its attractions! Dumb, yet virtuous, is DALLAS HOLFORD, always a booster for anything—provided you find him feeling—! Don't be alarmed girls. Passing the circus the other day, who should we see gulping down red soda pop but the inimitable "BILL" SEAMAN. There must have been a recess in heaven, judging from the angelic-face of our amorous and enticing GENEVIEVE WELDON,—known and loved by all. And, gang! there's the walking barometer, JAMES MORRIS, predicting cold weather and a good football team. Such a likable pair are JOE PEA- BODY and ANNA LOU ELLIOT. Members of Junior College Bran team complain that they can get no one to compete wtih them. Well studes, there's always BILL JETER. One of the best sports around here is HAZEL TAYLOR, president of the Cougar Collegians. To know her is to like her. "I flrade by the curve syetem.," says PROFESSOR VANZEE, as he glances at the row of beautiful co-eds in front of him. Gee, lookit the UP bundle of pep- CELIA LASKY. Dainty strolls lil' ROSE MARY LAWRENCE, having from San Ja- | clnto. Dr. Stanley Reeves Block is studv ing optometry in several of the Important cities of Europe. Not taking life in tbe simple easy-going way of many people of that country, but ever on tbe American rush, he finds time to pen a line to his friends at Houston Junior College. Let's return the compliment by sending him greetings to which he will reply and we will see some of these picturesque stamps. His letter comes just in time for our first issue, being dated September 13, 1930. My dear Mr, Miner: Your good letter reached me in Berlin some time ago, and I would have replied sooner but have been trying to make every minute count, so have found little time to either collect my thoughts or set them on paper. There are so many phases to so broad a topic, one does not know exactly where to begin. Europe 1b like a large mirror, it presents us with a reflection of the side we turn toward it. Many with whom I have spoken, have come here seeking various things and each has found the thing he sought. I believe William James said: "In all human beings there is but little difference but this little difference is highly important." And so it is with the Nations. Life in Europe is not vastly different from lite in America. But the difference is important. In America we have political liberty and personal slavery, while in Europe the reverse is true. But maybe I should not get too deep into politics. It is rather interesting to note the effect this has had on the people. Let me narrow down now to Germany. Until the last war (we hope) Germany's people knew no political freedom whatsoever, and yet each bad all the personal liberty in the world, and still has for that matter. We all recall the story of the mill of San So- clci. That story is, to my mind typical of the German Europe. And this Empire has raised a people, orderly and law-abiding beyond the concept of the American mind. And ther* are many men in Germany and the rest of Central Europe who long for a restoration of the old order, which brings on more argument. Among the things I have seen which I think particularly worthy of note here, is the Institute for Foreigners of the University of Berlin. The purpose of this institute is to Instruct foreigners in the German language so that they may either return to their native land and teach German, or continue their studies in Germany at a German university, During the summer, while I was In attendance, there were men and women from 37 different nations, nearly 400 in all, enrolled. This institute under the able leadership of Dr. Kartzke and Dr. Remme is an outstanding success. Men and women come here without a word of German and in a very few short months are able to continue their studies advantageously in German. It Is surprising how' much German language can be instilled in so short a time. When I realty have time to collect my thoughts I will write more of this, for it is a worthy example from which I feel many American universities could learn much. I hope this letter Is along the lines you wish and you are certainly at liberty to use it as you see fit. Please remember me to all my friends at H. J. C. Most cordially, Stanley R. Block. BRIGHT FROSH After a rattling discussion as to the proper uses of will, shall and other such atrocities in a freshman English class, the following was submitted by Phillip Allen: Since will Is would And shall is should. Should I use shall Or will or would? But will or would Or shall or should, I shall use should Since will is would. Miss Agnes Mae Kluppel, and Leo A. Lungsdorf were married on Thursday, October 9, at the Holy Rosary- church. The bride graduated from Houston Junior college in 1929. She is Ihe daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Kiuppel, 20 Sunset Drive, Houston. During the past year she has been doing part-time teaching in the Houston public schools. Mr. Langsdorf attended the Alamo Business college of San Antonio. He is at present a clerk in the civil court of the Alamo City. Mr. and Mrs. Langsdorf will reside at 1414 McKinley street, San Antonio. ROLT-MATELA The marriage of Miss Helen L. Bolt and Josef Matela, Jr., took place March 6 at the home of the bride's parents, 2211 Louisiana, with Judge ■Campbell Overstreet officiating. Roth these young people have been students at H. J. C. The bride is employed in the children's department of the Houston Public Library. Mr. Matela who attended the first year of H. J. C. is employed by the Loose Leaf Supply Company of Houston. Mr. and Mrs. Matela will make their home at 1423 Arlington street, Hous- MARRS-WEINZ1ERL Miss Mary C. Marrs, one of the first year students of H .J. C. and John F. Weinzierl were married June 111 at Christ Church, Episcopal, the Rev. James S. Allen, rector of the church, officiating. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. M, N. Marrs of Austin. Her father has been highly regarded as State Superintendent of Public Instruction, and he has done nation-wide work for the Parent-Teachers' Association. Mrs. Weinzierl has been doing school work in Houston. Mr. Weinzierl is Is an oil geologist. Mr, and Mrs. Weinzierl now reside at the Warwick hotel. BROWN-LUCAS A wedding that is of interest to H. J. C. students is that of Miss Mamie Claire Brown to Harold C. Lucas. News of this wedding arrived at the opening of the college this year. Mrs. Lucas is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Brown, 1809 Hussion Street, Houston. The groom is a grau- uate of the civil engineering department of the university of Mississippi. He Is at present In the oil business in Brunswick, Georgia. Mr. and Mrs. Lucas reside at 1020 Richmond street, Brunswick. MASKE-PORTER Miss Josephine Maske, class of '30, was married on June 20 to Charles Porter of Caldwell. Mrs. Porter is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph make, 2301 Truxillo, Houston. The groom, known on the campus as "Red," won recognition last year for his excellent work with the football squad. He Is now employed with the Yont Lee Oil company at Mount Bellvieu, Texas. SHEFFIELD-DEE Another wedding of note during the past summer was that of Miss Gladys C. Sheffield .to Louis Dee which took place on August 6. The bride was a teacher at Jefferson Davis senior high school, Houston. Mr. Dee is a former H. J. C. football star, who is now attending Georgetown university. Mr. and Mrs. Dee now reside at 3307 N. street, N. W., Washington, D. C. THOMPSON-HAYSLIP Houston Junior college students of 1929 were interested to learn of the wedding of June 14 o[ Miss Alma Thompson and V. H. Haysltp. The bride attended H. J, C. last year, following her graduation from the Masonic high school in Fort Worth. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M, Thompson, 1409 Clay street, Houston. Mr. Hayslip is now in the employ of the Humble Oil company. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Hayslip la al 2302 Dunlavy street, Houston.
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