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The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928
File 003
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The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928 - File 003. April 30, 1928. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/119/show/117.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 30, 1928). The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/119/show/117

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928 - File 003, April 30, 1928, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/119/show/117.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928
Contributor
  • Williams, Crawford, Jr.
Date April 30, 1928
Language English
Description From masthead: "Published Monthly by the Students of Houston Junior College of Houston, Texas."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript SUMMER SCHOOL SCHEDULE— (Continued from page one) and Texas University for work in accordance with the requirements of these institutions covering advanced work. Three courses, one hour per day, may be taken in Sam Houston extension, or nine term hours; two courses, one and one-half hours per day each, in Texas extension, or six semester hours. Tuition Fees. Tuition in the Junior College will be $18.00 for one course, or three, semester hours, $30.00 for two courses or six semester hours. This 13 the same fee as was charged last summer for six semester hours. Sam Houston State Teachers College fees, on a basis of two semester hours per course, will be $12.00 for one, $24.00 for two, $30.00 for three term courses, or the equivalent of nine term hours. University of Texas tuition is on the same basis as Junior College. Arrangements will be made, so far as possible, in both the Junior College and University of Texa3 extension work to provide for odd thirds. When work is desired in term units, students may make the following arrangements : For first term, take first four weeks of corresponding semester course. For second term, take last two weeks of first semester and first two weeks of second semester. Three thirds, of course, correspond to two semester courses. Students are urged to work off this summer all odd third courses, so that future work may be taken in semester units. Early Enrollment. It is highly desirable that registration should be completed by Saturday, June 2nd, in order that the program may provide, so far as possible, for all courses desired. Registration will close Monday, June 4th. Mr. N. K. Dupre and Mr. H. W. South will be at the building each afternoon and Saturday morning from May 26th to June 2nd to register students for the summer session. It will greatly aid in setting up class schedules if those who intend to enter the summer school will make tentative enrollment at once, stating exactly what courses are desired. Such statements should be sent to F. M. Black, 603 Great Southern Life Building. The expense for maximum program Library fee (required of all students) 2.00 in the summer session will be: Tuition $30.00 Matriculation fee (payable once only) 5.00 Laboratory fees: Biology 2.50 Physics 2.50 Chemistry 3.00 Education -50 Courses Offered. The following courses will be offered in the Junior College if there is sufficient demand: English, 113, 123, 213; Mathematics 113, 123, 213; History 113, 123, 213; Biology 13, 213; Chemistry 114; Physics 113; Spanish A, 113; Education 113E, Child study; Education 123E, Elementary methods; Education 213E, Demonstration teaching in Elementary school; Education 223H, High School methods; Education 223E, Elementary methods; Education 213H, Demonstration teaching in high school; Education 213, General methods; Public School Music, 113, 213; Public School Art, 113, 213; Physical Education, 113T, 123T, For Elementary teachers in Houston Schools; Physical Training, 113, 123. Sam Houston State Teachers College Courses: History 315, Texas History; History 316, Texas History; History 300, European History; History 305, American History; English 315, American Literature; English 305, Shake speare's Predecessors; English 306, Shakespeare's Comedies; English 301, Tennyson; English 210, Teaching of English (required of all English majors). University of Texas Courses: Education 472 a. i., Psychology of Learning; Education 430 a.i. Psychology of Elementary Subjects. , Summer Session Explanation of Junior College numerals: The first figure indicates the year (freshman, 1; Sophomore, 2;) the second indicates the term (first or second); the third indicates the semester hour credit. For example, 113 means a freshman course, first term rating, and three (3) hours credit. English. English 113. Composition and Rhetoric. A study of the principles of good writing, analysis and discussion of the representative English and American essays; special emphasis on Exposition and Argumentation; one thousand pages of outside reading; weekly themes. Mr. Harris. English 123. Composition and Rhe- tic. A continuation of English 113; emphasis on Description and Narration; study of representative short stories; weekly themes; collateral reading. Mr. Harris. English 213. Outline History of English Literature. A survey of English literature from the beginning to the Age of Classicism; critical study of masterpieces in prose and poetry including the representative writings of Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Milton; original essays; collateral reading. Mr. Harris- History. History 113L. English History to 1783. This course deals with the origin of the nation; early political and social organization; the feudal state; the rise of the national state; special emphasis on those phases bearing more directly upon the social, economic, and political institutions related to American life. Mr. Miller. History 123L. English History from 1783 to the present. Special emphasis will be placed upon those features of English History that are a part of the background of American social and political life, including those forces that end to draw the two nations together or to keep them apart. Mr. Miller. History 213. American History from the discovery of America to 1860. An intensive study of geographical, political, social, and economic forces that created and developed the nation prior to the Civil War. Mr. Miller History 223. American History from 1860 to the present time; with special emphasis upon those forces that have caused this nation to grow into its present world position. History 113 and 123. Modern and Contemporary European History. A study of the social, political, and economic history of Europe from the Congress of Vienna, 1815,to and including the period of the World War. Admission to the second half year will be granted to students enrolling for the first half year. Government 223. The Government of the United States. The course gives careful study of National, State and Municipal Governments of the United States. Mathematics. Mathematics 113. Trigonometry. Function of Angles, Logarithms, So- ltion of Triangles. Algebra, Rapid review of Fundamentals of high school Algebra. Five days a week. Mr. Porter. Mathematics 123. Analytic Geometry. Coordinates of Points, the Locus of an Equation, the Straight line, the Conic Sections. Calculus. Differentiation. Five days a week. Mr. Porter. Mathematics 213. Calculus. Differentiation, Integration, Applications to Areas, Volumes, Work, Pressure, etc. THE COUGAR Five days a week. Mr. Porter. Education. Education 223H. Applied methods in high school teaching. All applicants for four year high school certificates are required to take this course. A study of high school units of instruction together with observation of high school classes and teaching in the demonstration school. Mr. Henderson. Education 223E. Demonstration teaching in elementary grades. This course gives the student an opportunity to apply the principles of education studied in Education 213, with special emphasis placed on the work of the elementary school. Much time is given to the organization of units of instruction' and the application of modern methods in their execution. (This course is required of all students enrolled in the curriculum for elementary teachers, who expect to continue work in a teacher's college. Mr. Henderson. Education 113E. Child Psychology. A study of the changes which take place in the life of the child as related to the process of education. Prerequisites, Education 113, 123. Mr. Ker- bow. Education 123E. Elementary Methods. This course is designed primarily for elementary teachers. A study of the laws of learning, their relation to child growth, emphasizing their application and influence in the classroom, particularly in the field of methods. Prerequisite, Education 113. Mr. Kerbow. Education 213. General Methods. In this course, emphasis will be placed on the stimulus-response type of psychology and the Dewey-Kilpatrick philosophy as applied to the fundamental methods of teaching. Prerequisite. . Sophomore standing. Mr. Kerbow. Extension Courses. Education 430 a. i. Psychology of the Elementary School Subjects. Study of the psychological processes involved in subjects of the elementary school curriculum. Individual investigation and report. Prerequisite: Education 314 and 317, or their equivalent. Two semester hours. (Formerly Education 171-. Requires junior standing. Mr. Cooke. Education 472 a. i. Psychology of Learning. Survey of current theories in educational psychology. Lectures and reports. Prerequisites: Four advanced semester hours in education, preferably in educational psychology. Two semester hours. (Formerly the first half of Education 182). Mr. Cooke. Science Chemistry 114. Introductory Chemistry. A general introductory course dealing with the fundamental principles of general chemistry. During the first term the laboratory exercises are arranged to illustrate the principles discussed in lectures. During the last term the laboratory work deals with general principles of qualitative analysis and its application to industry. Three lectures, two rectations (90 minutes) and fifteen hours laboratory work weekly. Mr. Bishkin. Physics 113-123. Introductory Physics. An elementary course on heat, sound, light, magnetism, electricity, and experimental dynamics. Three lectures, two recitations (90 minutes), and seven and one-half hours of laboratory work weekly. Mr. Bishkin. Biology 113. Physiology, Morphology, Cytology, and Histology of the Frog with constant reference to the Human Body. Brief sketch of immunity and genetics; also an introduction to Protozoology. Seven and one- half hours lectures and eight hours laboratory per week. Mr. Ander Biology 213. This is a course in Medical Entomology, discussing insects and their relation to disease with reference to their life cycles and control. Seven hours lectures, and eight hours laboratory per week. Mr. Ander. Spanish Spanish A Beginners' Course. Equivalent to first semester's work of Instructor rENTATIVE SCHEDULE OF CLASSES JUNIOR COLLEGE 8:00-9:30 9:30-11:00 11:00-12:30 12:30-2:00 Mr. Harris English 113 English 123 English 213 Mr. Porter Mathematics 213 Mathematics 113 Mathematics 123 Mr. Bishkin Chemistry 114 Physics 113 Mr. Ander Biology 213 Biology 113 Mr. Miller History 123 L History 213 History 123 L Mrs. Soule Spanish Aa Spanish 113 Spanish 213 Miss Stevens Music 113 EI. Meth. Music 123 El. Meth. Public School Music 213 Miss Rucker Public School Art 213 Art 113 El. Method Art. 123 El. Meth. Mr. Bender High School Methods P. Ed. 123 H P. T. General Methods P. E. 113 P. T. Miss Mackey P. T. El. Method P. E. 113E P. T. P.T. Mr. Henderson El. Meth. Ed. 223 E High School Ed. 223 E Demonstration Classes Mr. Kerbow Child Study Ed. 113 E General Meth. Ed. 213 El. Meth. Ed. 123 E Sam I Unive ouston course rsity courses will be sched will be schedu iled by Mr. Hi ed by Mr. Co ffor oke ENROLLMENT BLANK All who intend to enter either Junior College or extension courses fill out the blank so the schedule of classes may include as far as possible all classes desired. Mail the blank as early as possible to F. M. Black, 603 Great Southern Building, Houston. It is my intention to enroll in the Houston Junior College summer session, 1928, for the following courses: 1. E. E. Oberholtzer, Pres.; F. M. Black, Dean; N. K. Dupre, Ass't Dean college Spanish. Mrs. Soule. Spanish 113. First semester of second year college Spanish. Prerequisite, Spanish A or two years high school Spanish. Mrs. Soule. Spanish 213. Third year college Spanish. Composition, reading, and conversation. Prerequisite, two years of college Spanish, or three or four years of high school Spanish. Mrs. Soule. Art. Art 113. Illustration. Lettering. Color Harmonies. Free hand drawing of simple plants, tree shapes, figures and animals in silhouette, and objects in two dimensions. Booklet and poster making. Construction with paper, cardboard, thin wood, and clay. Designing of simple border, and all over patterns, an of appropriate decorations for booklets and constructed articles. Methods of presenting work to elementary grade pupils. Miss Rucker. Art 123. Study of foreshortened circle. Drawing elliptical objects singly and in groups. Drawing objects in pencil line and in light and shade. making water color drawings of objects showing high lights and shadows. Poster making through paper cut shapes and tempera color. Stencilling in light and dark and in color. Wood block printing*. Japanese bookbinding. Miss Rucker. Art 213. Object drawing in outline, tend light and shade. Prospective, parallel and two point with free hand sketching of objects. Composition, plants, landscapes, still life in light and dark, and in color. Color harmonies. Design, border and all over pat terns from geometric and nature motifs. Lettering applied to cards, books, portfolios, etc. Miss Rucker. Music Music 113. Presentation of rote songs, the child voice in singing and treatment of the unmusicial child, ear training, sight reading, elementary theory, study of major scales and simple rhythmic problems. Music 123. Continued study of rote songs, further development of music reading, introducing more advanced tonal and rhythmic problems, melodic dictation, major and minor scales. Music 213. Continued study of rote songs, more difficult music reading, more advanced rhythmic problems, chromatics, interval studies in diatonic major scale, continued study of melodies in minor in minor, simple 3ong forms. Physical Education. Physical Education 113. Principles and Methods of Physical Education: historical and social background; general principles governing physical diagnosis and corrective work; emphasis on organization and administration, Text-book and research. Five time3 per week. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Bender. Physical Education 123. Personal and Community Hygiene: fundamentals in school health; supervision and medical inspection; mental and social hygiene; hygiene of nutrition of the respiratory system, of the circulatory system, etc. Text- book and research. Five times per week. Credit, three semester hours- Mr. Bender. Physical Education 113-123. Practical gymnasium class work consisting of formal exercises, tumbling, apparatus work, sports and games, stunts, and general recreational activities. Three times per week. Mr. Bender and Miss Mackey. S. H..S. T. C. Extension Courses Advanced courses in history and English will be offered by Mr. Huffor. These courses may be taken by those who meet the requirements laid down by the College. Credits will be recorded as Teachers College credits and may be transferred to other colleges. Students desiring to register for these courses should make necessary arrangements with Mr. Huffor.
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