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The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928
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The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928 - File 002. April 30, 1928. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/119/show/116.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 30, 1928). The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/119/show/116

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928 - File 002, April 30, 1928, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/119/show/116.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928
Contributor
  • Williams, Crawford, Jr.
Date April 30, 1928
Language English
Description From masthead: "Published Monthly by the Students of Houston Junior College of Houston, Texas."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR QThe Cougar Published Monthly by the Students of Houston Junior College of Houston, Texas STAFF Editor Crawford Williams Associate Editor Garland Sadler Business Manager Wallace Banks Advertising Manager Fred Mosk Asst. Business Mgr Eugene Tadlock Circulation Mgr. Eugene Jackson Student Represent. Irvin Waldman Sponsor May Bess Huberich Honorary Advisor F. M. Black DEPARTMENT EDITORS Sports Jack Barker Exchange Anna Ray Qualtrough Society Mary Elizabeth Rigg Assistant. Virginia Cronin Club Alleen Pickett Assistant Julia Luckie Humor Pat Quinn Assistant Shelley Jordan Vol. 1 April 30, 1928 No. 2 tution that will rank with Yale, Harvard and Notre Dame. Men are the same everywhere—it is the spirit that is different. That school spirit is woefully lacking is apparent to anyone who uses his eyes for something besides a facial adornment. Students attending athletic contests are mere spectators- They should be a live, vital part of the game- They should be cheering the team, sending rays of encouragement. Every gain should bring as much elation as if they were carrying the ball, every loss the heartbreak of the man who struck a stone wall. Every man is not fitted to battle on the gridiron, the diamond or the basketball court. Those who win the coveted places are fortunate—but every man and every girl in Houston Junior Col lege can furnish support by cheering. And the support is a vital thing in the intangible quality they call school spirit. Who'd want to play on a football team in the middle of the Sahara desert, with the pyramids of Gizeh as spectators? While someone wrote a poem about the "flower born to blush unseen and waste its sweetness on the desert air," it did the flower little good. Think it over.—Ed. Society DEFINITION OF "IT" By Opal Beane With apologies to William E. Schultz If man could exist without pep, would there be such facilities as we have offered to us today? Would there be any effort toward education ? Would there be prosperity such as we enjoy? The answer to all these questions is—No. Then what is this IT—this will-o- the-wisp, "Pep?" "Vigor, vitality, vim and punch The courage to act on a sudden hunch The nerve to tackle the hardest thing With feet that climb and hands that cling, And a heart that never forgets to sing That's pep. Sand and grit in a concrete base A friendly smile on a honest face The spirit that helps when another's down, That knows how to scatter the blackest frown, That loves his "College" and loves his town By Virginia Cronin The hop Friday night was a wow and every one there had the best time ever. The evening gowns presented a veritable rainbow of color and were in most cases advanced showings of the season's latest modes. Carrie Lee Sproles, who led the grand march with Frank Arrington, was truly bewitching in an exquisite gown of cream georgette embroidered with gold sequins. Fay Nold was charming in a delicate shade of cool green ornamented by a shoulder of contrasting color. Blue Heaven. Annie Ray Qualtrough was most striking in a graceful gown of heavenly blue; and her handsome who was her escort, unknowingly caused many an unsuspecting heart to flutter. Guseman vainly looked for someone to bounce, and then began dancing with dainty little Nancy Lee Wilson, too cute for words in a white satin gown with American Beauty roses ornamenting the shoulder. Gorgeous Looking. What startling vision nearly the eyes with its brilliancy? Why, it is Mary Elizabeth Rigg, looking perfectly regal in a gorgeous white georgette creation with deep fringe. And who is the dream girl in turqoise blue taffeta and cream lace? Why, Mar- jorie Draper, we might have known. Anna Mae Woods looked unusually beautiful, and Tessie Campbell was most charmingly gowned. Madeline Keith with her pascinating head of curls flitted from one partner to the other—a perfect belle. Mary Bond, usually quiet and demure, surprised everyone with her vivacity; she was lovely! Florence Odom, in a gown of delicate blue, seemed to be a special favorite of Coach Bender. Three Cheers for Coach. Coach Bender wa3 telling Jessie Jeter that he'd been hunting her all evening. Where have I heard that before ? Incidentally,Jessie looked most quaint and charming in clouds of pink tulle and long clinging skirt. And Opal Beane with the best looking flame-haired boy made the cutest couple imaginable! Julia Luckie, a vision of loveliness in misty folds of blue and silver chiffon, looked serene and cool, while the rest of us tried to. Janice Marshall was a perfect picture with her lovely auburn curls constrasting vividly with her exquisite shawl of Nile green. Oh, there's Wallie Banks handing his special line to a girl in a green dress. I believe she's falling for it, too. Sweet tunes—how can I see every one and dance, too? Oh, there's a little girl in gobs of ruffles, but she needs just one more. Overheard during the romantic strains of Diane: "I love the way the boys talk down here." "Yes, it must be that Mason-Dixon line you hear so much about." My, I am getting off my subject! I must not forget to mention the precious red figured chiffon with heavenly pleats which looked so adorable on Seline Rosenzweig. And don't you think Elsie Burr is chic in that nobby little dress and hat? Ida Mehr was unusually quiet, but neverthe- EXCHANGE Junior colleges of Texas have manifested great interest in the first issue of The Cougar and have shown a spirit of cooperation in acknowledging our publication with letters of congratulation A numb of the exchange editors of the junior college papers have sent us copies of their publications, which have been most helpful in giving us information about the activities and accomplishments of the other schools. The Kennel, published by the Texarkana Junior College, shows marked originality and the much desired feeling of co-operation existing between the members of the faculty and the student body. The Wichitan is to be commended for its interesting news items, its arrangement, and its worthwhile editorials. The Scotchman from the Edinburg Junior College manifests the journalistic ability of the students and members of the staff. In its account of the numerous student activities and programs during the first year of the school, it serves as an inspiration to other colleges to undertake big things. The Bay Window from Muskegon, Michigan is marked by unusual wit and cleverness. We would like to know if the wise Afghad Saffu will consent to solve some of our love problems too. Yours for bigger and better exchange.—Annie Ray Qualtrough, Exchange Editor. That's pep. To say "I Will," for you know you can To look for the best in every man To meet each thundering, knock- cut blow Come back with a smile because you know You have the best in the whole darn show And that's pep." less fascinating in her exquisite Span ish shawl. Virginia Cronin with her characteristic charm and poise, looked like a Vanity Fair fashion plate in a perfectly gorgeous evening gown of delicate powder blue satin lined with gold and artistically ornamented with French flowers on the neck and skirt; she could well be called "a daughter of the gods; divinely tall and most divinely fair." Editor's note—Listen, boys, don't blame Virginia for this; but that's the way I felt when I saw her, am I just had to say it. Shelley Jordan, despite the fact that she had labored arduously the entire morning over the decorations, was vivacious and animated, and helped every one have a good time. Mi3s Huberich, radiant in a bouffant dress of delicate green ojffeta, ornamented with French tapestry design of pink rose buds caught with silver ribbon, was a divine chaperon. Miss Topham looked most attractive in a gown of green with gold lace overdrape, and the exquisite old fashioned chain of dull gold about her neck enhanced the richness of her costume. Mrs. Harris was unusually lovely in delicate georgette costume. Are those the soothing strains of Home Sweet Home—so soon? My, I'm tired, but it's been a heavenly dance! THRILLING DRAMATIC—PLAY— (Continued from page one) Plot Given. The plot of the play concerns three college graduates. Dixie, Rosamond, and Ann, who, inspired with the determination to aid the college endowment fund, decide to open a tea room. Through the efforts of Brian, an admirer of Rosamond, they secure a charming old home, the property of Dallas Thorne, a wealthy young fellow who has been much in the public notice on account of his engagement to Gloria Sherwood,* beauty and belle, who on the eve of the wedding eloped with another wealthy suitor. Dallas returns home unexpectedly and is hired as a servant in his own home by Dixie. He is not given time to explain his position. Gloria has 3e- (Continued on page four) HUMOR _Szi DR. BELIKOSE SERABELLAM'S ADVICE. By Pat Quinn. Dear Doctor Serabellam: I go to the Junior College, but I can't study or do anything because of the girls—they won't leave me alone. How can I keep them off?—Dudley Ellis. Dear "Dud:" First I would advise you to come to school in a German tank mounted with 4 big "Berthas." Upon your arrival, immediately don an electrically charged suit of armor and other accoutrements of war-like appearance. Next, have a six foot fence around you with a moat outside of that (the latter can be fastened on your shoulders with straps). Then fill the moat with hot sulfuric acid. If this won't keep the girls away, try taking a warm solution of bichloride of mercury every night before retiring.— Dr. B. Serabellam. P. S. You may use this idea before I have it patented. Dear Doctor: What can I do? I refused Tony my love and he is at death's door.— Anna Mae Woods. Dear Anna Mae: See that he gets through, child, see that he gets through all right.—Dr. Serabellam. Chinese Laundryman: Me no speak "Melican." Johnnie Thompson: No, I guess you speak pelican by the size of your bill. We'll now hear from Broadcasting Betty who will slay (we mean execute) the Baker's song in a well-bread manner—nothing crumby. There once was a girl aviator, Who flew to the distant equator, There a cannibal bold, Named "Avi," I'm told, Warmly welcomed the girl—(Avi- ate-er). What you need, Pollard, is an electric bath. Not I, doctor. I once had an uncle that died from one of those at Sing Sing. WE WOULDN'T BE SURPRISED IF By Shelley Jordan Tessie Campbell were charged with slander, due to her caustic, cutting remarks about all concerned Guy Savage were charged with cruelty to animals if we accept testimony from his dancing partners. Elma Basquez were charged with manslaughter. She slays 'em and lets them lie where they fall. Hilda Ellison were charged with perjury as a result of that terrible falsehood she told in English class. Oliver Guseman were charged with vagrancy. Will anyone who has ever seen the young man in question act though he had anything to do or any prospects of ever having anything to do, step to the front? Annie Ruth Moore charged with blackmail or bribery. Ask Prof. Ander. He knows. Fred Mosk and Eugene Tadlock ire jointly charged with loitering. Note the coffee expeditions between classes. Homer Ley were charged with conduct unbecoming a gentleman. Alleen Pickett, demure little blonde, incriminated him with the statement: moonlight and roses, gondolas and what have you ? Alone, and Homer just talked. Spring Fashion Note: No dresses to be worn above the knee. Wow! Anna Mae, please marry me when you finish school. A thousand times, No, Toney. And they lived happily ever after. Mary Elizabeth: Why did you fall for me, Geney dear? Geney Dear: I don't know, M. E-, I must have been unbalanced. And now the ode to the poor Scotchman that bought a suit with two pairs of pants and died before the first pair was worn out. 1st College Student: There goes a good young girl. 2nd Dumbell: She must be young. One good thing about our class president is that he never indulges in intoxicants. He has water on the knee and only takes anti-freeze solutions. * 'Tis rumored that Mr. Harris on his first visit across the 'pond' to Gay Paree, is said to have admonished the Captain of the boat: "Oh, Captain, don't fail to notify me when the tide rises, so I may close the portholes." Phunny Phil Philosophizes: "Stoutness is a state of being which is eagerly desired by those who do not possess it, and the removal of which sought by those who do." Before we get our grade reports, we hope, afterwards—mope. Garcia's trousers are made of burlap. He must be trying to develop a little "Sack3 appeal." Gypsy Maid: Wait, I tella your fortune, mister. Guy Savage: How much? Maid: Twenty-five cents. (Same Goof): Correct. San Jacinto Cafe 1421 Holman Ave. GOOD EATS CocaCoIa 5c Ice Cream 10c Munn's Barber Shop 917 Capitol A ve. Prompt, Courteous Service F. JAMAIL j Fresh Fruits & Vegetables Capitol and Reisner LOST! One Bill Folder Containing Money Valuable Receipts REWARD! See Jack Winston PARK RITE SYSTEM Travis & Lamar D. C. McINTYRE, Mgr. In Houston's new theater district Washing—Polishing—Greasing
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