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The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928
File 003
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The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928 - File 003. April 30, 1928. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/114/show/112.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 30, 1928). The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/114/show/112

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928 - File 003, April 30, 1928, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/114/show/112.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 30, 1928
Contributor
  • Williams, Crawford, Jr.
Date April 30, 1928
Language English
Description From masthead: "Published Monthly by the Students of Houston Junior College of Houston, Texas."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript NEW BUILDING FOR JUNIORS IS BELIEVED NEAR Dean Black Says Prospects Bright for Leeland Avenue Site By Garland Sadler j Prospects for a new building for the Houston Junior College are exceedingly bright and in the: near future students of the college will probably enroll in a building located at Leeland Avenue and Louisiana Street, according to F. M. Black, dean of the college. "The School Board now has an option on a large tract of land adjoining Taylor school, *' Mr. Black declared. "This land is now occupied by the Y. M. C. A. tennis courts and the Humble Oil company baseball park. "It is very probable that the new Junior College building will be erected here. At present tentative plans are being formulated which, if accepted by the School Board, will include in the new Junior College building, space for a new senior high school, perhaps to take the place of Sam Houston high school. May Buy Park. "If this site is accepted it is also very probable that West End baseball park will also be purchased and used as an athletic field by the Houston Junior College," Mr. Black continued. "The need for a Junior College is indeed great, and at present we are continually stepping upon the heels of San Jacinto high school students. There are naturally some conflicts between the two student bodies even (Continued on page four) BEAUMONT MEETS COUGARS MAY 5 Cougar track team and the South Park thinly clads of Beaumont will be pitted against each other Saturday, May 5, on the Junior College field in the first track meet of the season. Each school boasts an array of track stars, and the meet promises to be closely contested. For Houston Junior College, Bo Martin will speed down the cinder track in the dashes. Byron Sadler will step the 440-yard dash, with Roy Carley running the distance races. In the field events, Guseman, Savage and Barker will hurl the discus and put the shot. Cherault is entered in the pole vault and Savage in the high jump. A large attendance at the meet is expected, since there is no school on Saturday, the day of the event. U.T. Debators Lose to H. J. C Houston Junior College debating team caused one of the major upsets of the year in forensic circles when it scored a judges decision over e University of Texas team representing the Athenaeum Literary Society at Austin, March 3. The winning team was composed of Richard Speed, sophomore, and Garland Sadler, freshman. The University was represented by Billy Hamblem and Leroy Jefferies, the same team that captured the state! title for Ho Hard High School two years ago. Judges of the contest were 0. C. Corry, instructor in economics; G. W. Stumberb, professor of law, and Miss Mollie Montgomery of the public speaking department. Houston Junior College won by a two to one decision. H. W. Harris, instructor in public speaking, former coach of the varsity coach of the Houston Junior College debating team at Texas, and now team, revealed plans for bringing the Southwest Texas State Teachers college debaters to Houston within the next few weeks. An effort will be made to place H. J. C. in a debate conference next year, and a fight will be staged for a state junior college championship, Mr. Harris said. Members of the debate squad: J. Curry, T. Price, R. Speed, G. Sadler, and Henderson, have engaged in six contests this season, winning three and tying one. No decision was rendered in two of the debates. Defeated teams include Sam Houston high school, Athenaeum society (University of Texas), and Caldwell high school. Tied Sam Houston; no decision, Waco and Navasota high schools. Hot Weiner Roast on Cold Night, Not So Hot By Jack Barker My dear little classmates and playmates, were you ever invited to come out to the wilds to a weiner roast? And did it turn off cold enough to freeze the horns off a brass monkey, and when you got out there you found it had been postponed? The above happened to the writer. Boy, it was cold! I caught one of those fast street cars that abound in Houston, and as I stepped off at Eagle street, one of my procrastinating team-mates nearly ran over me. He informed me that the affair had been postponed. I wanted proof. , I got it. After riding several rough miles in his fresh air cage, I was ready to postpone anything, except my death Hermann Park was as bare as my hand, and there was no fire in the fireplace. I declared the weiner roast a huge success, in hot language. I understand that later, there was a wee bit of a crowd present, but all the (Continued on page four) THE COUGAR athleteueT letter awards Eight Cougar athletes will be a- warded basketball letters and sweaters, according to recommendations of the athletic council made public Friday. The men who will be thus honored are: Oliver "Bo" Martin, Johnny Bugg, "Pooch'' Jones, Oliver Guseman, Walter Scarborough , Murray Addison, Bert Adkins and Irvin Wald- man. Awards will be made amid suitable presentation ceremonies as soon as the 3tyle of sweaters is determined and other plans completed within the next few days. The Cougar basketball team won the majority of games played the past season, losing only to the high school team of the city. And now all students are eagerly turning their eyes toward next year when it is predicted Sam Houston Junior College will turn out a championship quintet. Naasson K. Dupre Naasson K. Dupre, assistant dean of the Houston Junior col- . lege, compliments the discipline I of the student body. He has I had nine years experience in ad- j ministrative teaching in Texas. j Election is Announced Students and faculty members of the Houston Junior College will look 'em over, wage a red hot election, and during the ensuing month select from their number those best qualified to fill seven positions of honor. Some student will be selected as 1. The Most Popular Girl; 2. The Most Popular Boy; 3. The Most Popular Faculty Member; 4. The Prettiest Girl; 5. The Most Handsome Boy; 6. The Most Representative Student; 7. The Most Witty Student. Rules of the Contest. At the end of this article the reader will find an official nominating blank listing all of the above seven selections. This coupon gives your seven first choices for the places listed and starts each nominee off with 50 official votes. Only one nomination blank is entitled to each nominee. Persons desiring to make nominations should clip the coupon and write the full name of their choice for each of the selections in the blank spaces provided on the coupon. The nomination blank should then be placed in the official ballot box located in the conservatory on the second floor. Everyone interested may vote as many times as he wishes provided he pays the one-cent additional fee for each vote. Each ballot purchased (Continued on page four) DEFINITION OF "IT" By Opal Beane With apologies to William E. Schultz If man could exist without pep, would there be such facilities as we have offered to us today? Would there be any effort toward education ? Would there be prosperity such as we enjoy? The answer to all these questions is—No. Then what is this IT—this will-o- the-wisp, "Pep?" "Vigor, vitality, vim and punch The courage to act on a sudden hunch The nerve to tackle the hardest thing With feet that climb and hands that cling, And a heart that never forgets to sing That's pep. Sand and grit in a concrete base A friendly smile on a honest face (Continued on page four) MR. DUPRE LAUDS JUNIOR STUDENTS Naasson K. Dupre, assistant dean of the Houston Junior college and recognized authority in the organization of junior colleges, has nothing but praise when speaking of the stu dent body of the Houston junior college. "We have one of the best student bodies with which I have ever dealt." said Mr. Dupre. "The full-time students are for the most part students who come here for an education. We have had a (Continued on page four) Thrilling Drama, 'Tea Toper Tavern,' Was Presented by Dramatic Club At San Jacinto High School Friday Mary Elizabeth Rigg and Richard Ragland Are Given Leading Roles in Character Play- By Alleen Pickett. "Tea Toper Tavern," was presented by members of the Houston Junior College Dramatic Club of which Coach John R. Bender is sponsor, at the auditorium of the San Jacinto High School at 8:15 p. m. Friday. Leading roles of the play, which was under the expert direction of Mrs. Lillian Blocker of the expression department of the Houston Conservatory of Music, were taken by Mary Elizabeth Rigg, president of the club, playing the part of Sally Lee Dixon, and Richard Ragland, cast in the role of Dallas Thorne. Major Parts. Others taking major parts were Hild- da Ellison, as Marion Day, a canny chaperon; Bernice Newton, Rosamond Reid, Marion's niece and just out of college; Annie Ruth Moore, Ann Annesley, a social service fiend; Garland Sadler, Barry Reid, Rosamond's freshman brother; Mildred Braman, Marriett Annesley, Ann's younger sister; Glady's Hitchcock, Tess, Ann's protege from the village; Eugene Jackson, Mike Ryan, a susceptible policeman; Richard Speed, Brian Pierpont, a brilliant young lawyer; Byron Sadler, Rev. Archibald Perry, pastor of the village flock; Joseph Maniscalco: John Sedgwick, an old flame of Miss Day; Anna Ray Qualtrough, Gloria Sherwood Jerome, a fascinating widow; and Shelley Jordan, as Celeste, Gloria's maid. Plot Given. The plot of the play concerns three college graduates. Dixie, Rosamond, and Ann, who, inspired with the determination to aid the college endowment fund, decide to open a tea room. Through the efforts of Brian, an admirer of Rosamond, they secure a charming old home, the property of Dallas Thorne, a wealthy young fellow who has been much in the public notice on account of his engagement to Gloria Sherwood, beauty and belle, who on the eve of the wedding eloped with another wealthy suitor. Dallas returns home unexpectedly and is hired as a servant in his own home by Dixie. He is not given time to explain his position. Gloria has 3e' cured a divorce and is again very much in evidence. Things start happening. Gloria again tries to ensnare Dallas. There is a costume ball; cases of smallpox and chicken pox, and the house, with its queer personnel, is quarantined. SUMMER SCHOOL SCHEDULE— (Continued from page one) conversation. Prerequisite, two years of college Spanish, or three or four years of high school Spanish. Mrs. Soule. Art Art 113. Illustration, Lettering, Color Harmonies. Free hand drawing of simple plants, tree shapes, figures and animals in silhouette, and objects in two dimensions. Booklet and poster making. Construction with paper, cardboard, thin wood, and clay. Designing of simple border, and all over patterns, an of appropriate decorations for booklets and constructed articles. Methods of presenting work to elementary grade pupils. Miss Rucker. Art 123. Study of foreshortened circle. Drawing elliptical objects singly and in groups. Drawing objects in pencil line and in light and shade, making water color drawings of objects showing high lights and shadows. Poster making through paper cut shapes and tempera color. Stencilling in light and dark and in color. Wood block printing. Japanese bookbinding. Miss Rucker. Art 213. Object drawing in outline, tend light and shade. Prospective, parallel and two point with free hand sketching of objects. Composition, plants, landscapes, still life in light and dark, and in color. Color harmonies. Design, border and all over pat terns from geometric and nature motifs. Lettering applied to cards, books, portfolios, etc. Miss Rucker. Music. Music 113. Presentation of rote songs, the child voice in singing and treatment of the unmusicial child, ear training, sight reading, elementary theory, study of major scales and simple rhythmic problems. Music 123. Continued study of rote songs, further development of music reading, introducing more advanced tonal and rhythmic problems, melodic dictation, major and minor scales. Music 213. Continued study of rote songs, more difficult music reading, more advanced rhythmic problems, chromatics, interval studies in diatonic major scale, continued study of melodies in minor in minor, simple song forms. Physical Education. Physical Education 113. Principles and Methods of Physical Education: historical and social background; general principles governing physical diagnosis and corrective work; emphasis on organization and administration. Text-book and research. Five time3 per week. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Bender. Physical Education 123. Personal and Community Hygiene: fundamentals in school health; supervision and medical inspection; mental and social hygiene; hygiene of nutrition of the respiratory system, of the circulatory system, etc. Text- book and research. Five times per week. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Bender. Physical Education 113-123. Practical gymnasium class work consisting of formal exercises, tumbling, apparatus work, sports and games, 3tunts, and general recreational activities. Three times per week. Mr. Bender and Miss Mackey. S. H. S. T. C. Extension Courses Advanced courses in history and English will be offered by Mr. Huffor. These courses may be taken by those who meet the requirements laid down by the College. Credits will be recorded as Teachers College credits and may be transferred to other colleges. Students desiring to register for these courses should make necessary arrangements with Mr. Huffor. Poor boy, did you lose your finger? No, Virginia, I didn't have time to wait so I left it with the manicurist to be polished.
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