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The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929
File 004
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The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929 - File 004. April 1929. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/109/show/108.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1929). The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929 - File 004. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/109/show/108

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929 - File 004, April 1929, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/109/show/108.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. II, No. 4, April 1929
Contributor
  • Shepperd, Louise
Date April 1929
Language English
Description From masthead: "Published Monthly by Journalism Students. Official Publication of Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript THE COUGAR MISS MAY BESS HUBERICH Instructor in English ADVANTAGES FOUND IN SMALL CLASSES Individual Attention Is Possible When Class Roster Small One of the biggest advantages of Junior College is that the classes are small enough for each student to receive Individual attention from the instructors. The average size of recitation classes Is 24. In the laboratory section the average is 27. That small classes promote initiative and good scholarship is not to be questioned. For in the smaller classes the student and the teacher are personally acquainted and this means greater interest and closer cooperation. The student who fee's that his instructor is taking a personal interest in his work is likely to be eager to keep his record good, and the teaeher who does know and understand the student's individual position is more likely to be interested in each student and his work as a whole, and is certain to be better liked by all students than a teacher who knows only a part of the members of his classes. Smaller classes make each student more responsible for interesting recitation periods. Individuals are called upon more often than in larger classes and class work must be good to keep the grades good. Then, too, each student knows all the others in the smaller classes and the work is naturally more interesting when everybody knows everybody else. Because of these things we expect the size of our faculty to Increase proportionately as our enrollment increases. We have small classes now and we want to keep them. We have faculty members who are personally interested In each student in their classes, and who are well liked Dy all their students, and we want this to continue. For on these things depend, in a great measure, the growth and success of our school. COLLEGE LIBRARY NOW ONE OF BEST EQUIPPED * * rt * IN STATE DESPITE AGE With more than 4,000 books now available, and 600 more due this month, the Houston Junior College library is one of the best-equipped libraries in the state, considering its age. Mrs. Hannah Shearer, librarian, announces that the short story books have arrived, and about 40 copies of Pence and Law have been added to the shelves. The 600 books recently ordered will arrive in time for the school summer session. Mrs. Shearer stated that the library will be open for the summer session, and that with these extra books available, no difficulty should be experienced by the students in finding proper references. "The students are beginning to use the library more than previously," said Mrs. Shearer, explaining that they were becoming accustomed to the arrangement of the material. Many students do not use the library because of lack of knowledge of arrangement of material. When they do visit the library, they do not know hat to look for, nor where to find it. "If the students would use the catalogue, they should not have any trouble in doing the required work," Mrs. Shearer said. "When they go to another institution, they will have to it there, and this is an excellent place to start," she continued. Mrs. Shearer is very accommodat ing to the students in helping find the necessary books for outside reading and other reference work. Owing to the size of the college, there is ways ample room and references available at any time the student chooses to work. RECOGNITION COMES FROM FOREIGN PROF. FAR-AWAY DISTRICTS ARE REPRESENTED ON JUNIOR COLLEGE ROLL Houston Junior College fame has reached points throughout the U. S. This fact was disclosed when a survey made of the resident towns of Houston Junior College students showed 34 towns in and out of the state represented. SPECIAL NOTICE According to a recent announcement, Mr. H. W. South is appointed Bursar at Houston Junior College. Junior College students are very proud of the faculty and justly so, as evidenced by the following letter, addressed to Mr. Cecil B. Smith, professor of History and Government. (Translated from French) Mentz University, Russia, 4-3-'29. Most Honored Professor: I am asking the following favor of you. We have heard here of your notable work, "Relations Between the United States Government and That of Por- firio Diaz." For our studies in the history American this work is of great importance. Unfortunately it cannot be found here. Will you please tell me when and how it can be had. I beg you, sir, to pardon this inconvenience that I am causing you, and to accept my kind regards. Yours truly, PROF. A. SCHEPOTIEFF, Professor of History. Box P. 2. Recistrar and Instructor in Spanish RECENT MARRIAGE IS SURPRISE TO FRIENDS Popular Registrar Weds Member of San Jacinto Faculty Friends of Miss Kathleen Rucker, popular registrar and Spanish instructor at Houston Junior College, were surprised to learn of her marriage on Saturday, April 20, to Mr. F. Lee Duggan, a member of the San Jacinto High School faculty. Dr. J. N. R. Score officiated at the wedding ceremony, which was performed in Saint Paul's Methodist Church, in the presence of friends. Mrs. Duggan is a graduate of Texas University, and came to Houston to teach in the Junior College this year. Prior to coming here, she taught In the Alamo Heights High School of San Antonio. Mr. Duggan lias been employed in e San Jacinto Senior High School five years. Prior to coming here, he ttended Texas University. Both Mr. and Mrs. Duggan are extremely popular with both the students and faculty members of their respective schools. The Cougar staff, representing faculty and students of the entire Junior College, wish to express their best wishes and congratulations for a long and happy wedded life to our popular, attractive registrar. Following a, brief honeymoon at Galveston, Mr. and Mrs. Duggan are at home at 1301 Isabella. STUDENT AND FACULTY COMMITTEE PASSES ON # * * * ALL SOCIAL FUNCTIONS Junior College, in keeping with its policy of consulting students on every subject possib'e, has a social committee composed of popular members of the faculty. To this committee are presented all plans for school entertainment. Thus far the committee has given not only its approval of every affair, but also its help. Plans are first submitted to the committee, then to Mr. Dupre, who selects the best time for them to be carried out. This year the committee Is composed of Mr. Harris, chairman, Mr. Ander, Miss Huberich and Mrs. Bender. All of these teachers have shown themselves to be wholly in sympathy with the students. MR. H. W. HARRIS THREE NEW COURSES TO BEGIN THIS SUMMER Work Offered to Fit In With Public School Program Elementary Education will be featured in the summer semester at Houston Junior College. Three courses will be offered that particularly fit in the Houston Public School pro- Along with tnese courses there is the special advantage of the elementary demonstration school which is held, as is the Junior College, in the San Jacinto High School building. Prospective teachers will be given observation and pTactice teaching. This demonstration work carried out under the Educational Department will be acceptable at Texas University and the Teachers' College. Heretofore there has been some question about this. The last half of the second year music course will be offered with Miss Sage, assistant supervisor, as the instructor. She is taking Miss Steven's place. Methods in Elementary Physical Education, with special emphasis on the Houston Public School course oi study, will be given by Miss Patrick, who is the assistant supervisor in Physical Education, Public School Art will have for Its instructor Miss Grace Sands, who is taking the place of Miss Pearl Rucker. The full freshman work will tot offered and half of the sophomore work. o. in English and Publi Speaking MILBY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL W. I. Stevenson, Principal "I am particularly interested in the Junior Colliege because it is the subject on which I am writing my thesis. The Junior College is a saving of time and finance. Glad to co-operate." Courses and Schedule for Summer Semester 8:30—9:30 9:30—11:00 English 113 Mathematics 113 Mathematics 123 Biology 113 Sociology 223 History 113 L History 213 Physical Education 113 H Spanish A a Spanish 113 Education 223 E Education 223 H Public School Art 223 Education 113 Public School Music 113 Public School Art 113 Physical Education 123 Public School Music 213 (Credit Course) Writing 113 11:00—12:30 English 123 Economics 213 Chemistry 114 Government 223 Biology 223 Public School Art 213 Physical Education 123 12:30—2:00 English 213 Chi-mistry 124 Biology 123 History 123 Education 123 Education 213 Public School Music 223 ENGLISH PROF HAS PRAISE FOR COLLEGE Work Given in Junior College on Par With University By LOUISE SHEPPERD "The Junior College is filling a place in Houston that no other institution could fill," said Mr. Harris, instructor in English and public speaking, recently. "By offering night courses it affords many persons an opportunity to hold full-time positions in town and, at the same time, keep on with their school work. "Then, too, those boy3 and girls who have just finished high school and plan to go to college may stay at home and do their first year or first two years' work and have their credits accepted by any other college or university in the state. "Having had experience as a teacher in the University of Texas, and being familiar with many other colleges, I know that the work given here is as thorough as that any college or university can offer in the first two years," Mr. Harris will be in charge of the English department during the summer term. The first half and the second half of freshman English, and the first half of sophomore English, will he offered in the summer. "I understand there is quite a demand being made for the second half of sophomore English," he said, "and feel that in case sufficient demand made for it the administration will offer the course." Mr. Harris was chairman of the Social Committee here last summer is very enthusiastic about the coming summer's work, both in studies and in student activities. The school spirit was at its height last summer, Mr. Harris said, and he believes that it will be even better in the coming term. Students will have the use of the swimming pool, gymnasium, and playgrounds during the summer. The combined feature of profit and pleasure will appeal to a great many this summer, and this, together with the many things to be seen in and around Houston, is expected to increase the enrollment from neighboring towns and from other parts of the state. Laboratory work will be held in the afternoon. Registration for the Junior College Summer School will be held in the gymnasium of the San Jacinto High School building on: Friday. May 31—4:00-9:00 P.M. Saturday, June 1—9:00-12:00 A.M. Monday, June 3—8:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M. asses will begin Tuesday. Teachers should be careful to register on one of these three days to avoid the late registration fee. Students may not register for credit later than Friday, June 7. Class periods for the summer ses sion of the Junior College will be one and one-half hours long, and classes will meet five times each week. One course, meeting for the prescribed periods for the six week session will give three full semester hours credit, transferable to any standard college. A student may enroll for two classes, or a total of twelve semester hours Summer Session Fees Fees for the summer session vary with the amount of work taken by the student. Assuming that a student enrolls for the first time and takes the full amount of work, all fees would total $37.00 and would include the following fees, some of which many students would not pay, because they would not be taking laboratory courses: library fee, required of all students, $2.00; tuition for two three-hour courses, $30.00; matriculation fee, payable only once, $5.00; physics, $2.50; chemistry, $3; and education, $0.50. In case of students taking only one course, of three hours credit, the tuition fee is $18; other fees are as stated above. Two Changes in the Certificate Law (1) Teachers whose certificates expire during this summer may renew by attending the Junior College for the six weeks' period. The new law specifies that a certificate may be renewed with the completion of six semester hours of college work in the summer school. Until now, eight semester hours have been required. (2) The new law also requires that students applying for certificates must include three semester hours of government as one of the courses offered for the certificate. It further specifies that this three semester hours must be in United States Government. Our Government 223, which we are offering this summer, satisfies this requirement. SPECIAL NOTICE Announcement is made by administrative officials of the appointment of Mrs. F. Lee Duggan as Registrar at Houston Junior College.
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