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The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929
File 003
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The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929 - File 003. April 1929. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/109/show/107.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1929). The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/109/show/107

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929 - File 003, April 1929, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/109/show/107.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. II, No. 4, April 1929
Contributor
  • Shepperd, Louise
Date April 1929
Language English
Description From masthead: "Published Monthly by Journalism Students. Official Publication of Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR JUNIOR COLLEGE BEST\ PREPARATION FOR LIFE\ * * * * OF HIGHER EDUCATION By Bruce Manley When I finished high school I was thoroughly tired of staying at home. Accordingly, a few months later I was standing in line in front of the registrar's office at a university over 2000 miles from home. I entered the University of Michigan positively knowing that I wanted to become a geologist. When I returned home this past summer, I Had lost all interest In ever becoming a geologist, did not care whether or not I ever finished college. The first few months I was at the university I was completely lost. My best efforts were usually rewarded with low grades. At final examination all the freshmen were worried. Accidents do happen, however, lor some of us were allowed to stay. From my own experiences, I believe that by going to a junior college first, a student should have no such difficulties when he later enters a distant college. In the first place, the professors In a junior college take much more interest in the students because the classes are small. The professors give only short lectures at first, thus accustoming the students to taking notes on long lectures. By waiting a couple of years before entering a larger college, a student is more mature and better able to judge what he wants his life work to be. I feel that by going to junior coIleg< this year I have learned a number of things that will improve the character of my work when I return to the University of Michigan next fall. STUDENTS AID JUDGES IN DISTRICT DEBATING The I n t e r s c holastic Debating League had its district meet at Houston Junior College. The college students assisted in the judging, and en tertained the contestants. The faculty and students of the district schools were pleased with the decisions made and appreciated the interest that Junior College took in the meet. EFFECT OF FRATERNITIES Otl THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRESS OF THE COLLEGE STUDENT; WHY THE JUNIOR COLLEGE SYSTEM OFFERS ADVANTAGES PROF. MINER GIVES LECTURES ON CHINA Students Are Given Insight Into Chinese Art and Culture MR. A. L. KERBOW Announcement of— (Continued from page 1) to provide such classes, where as many as fifteen enrollments are received in a given subject. Class periods for the summer session of the Junior College will be one and one half hours long, and classes will meet five times eacn week. One course, meeting for the prescribed periods for the six-week session will give three full semester hours credit, transferable to any of the standard colleges. A student may enroll for two classes, or a total of six semester hours work. Fees for the summer session vary with the amount of work taken by the student. Assuming that a student enrolls for the first time and takes the full amount of work, all fees would total $37.00 and would Include the following fees, some of which many students would not pay, because they would not be taking la- boratory courses: Library fee, required of all students. ?2; tuition, lor two three-hour courses, $30; matriculation fee, payable only once, $5; total, $37. In addition to the above fees, laboratory courses carry special fees, as follows: biology, 55; physics, $2.50; chemistry, $3; and education, 50 cents. In the case of students taking only one course, of three hours credit, the tuition fee is SIS. Other fees are as listed above. Since the Junior College is entirely self-supporting, fees from tuition and other charges must pay for all expenses connected with the institution. It is only through low administration costs and through having a comparatively large enrollment that the cost of Instruction to a student is kept so relatively low. Inquiries concerning the courses to be offered this summer or other information relative to the junior college may be had by calling Preston 2642, public school administration offices, or by calling the Junior College office, San Jacinto Senior High School, Lehigh 4766, after 4 p. Students of Houston Junior College are being given an insight into Chinese life, art, and culture series of illustrated lectures given by Professor Miner, who has spent the greater part of his life in China, each Monday evening from 7:30 to 8:30 p. m. in Room 103. '■Chinese students never know the worry that we have over final examinations for when in danger of failing they can go and offer prayers to the great Chinese scholar, Confucius. If this doesn't bring mental relief they may have their fortunes told and learn whether there is any need of even taking the exams. If there isn't, the student may pacify his parents by buying them a good looking cof- i," Frofessor Miner said. An easy way to make a living in China, Mr. Miner informs us, is to become a Buddhist Priest. The priests are allowed to beg, and aleo receive an occasional handout from the monasteries. But even the priests have their difficulties. It is customary for them to make various vows, such remaining silent for a life time. For every degree a priest takes, he suffers three drops of burning incense to be dropped on his forehead. "The Buddhists believe that the seat of the intellect is in the abdomen," Mr. Miller said. Hence, the larger the abdomen, the greater the intelligence. Such beliefs are, however fast crumbling before the attack of western science. "The works of art in the Chinese temples are of a high degree. It was in China that porcelain originated, and much of the best porcelain still comes from there. Wealthy Chinese homes are artistic. In front of these homes are beautiful rock gardens containing flowers and pools of water. Inside the homes are statues and carvings of graceful design. "Back of the Chinese homes are high walls facing the street. This gives prlvajcy and protection, for there is no police system. While there are no police, stealing seldom takes place. People in the poorer sections of the cities even hang their clothes out In ihe street without danger of their being stolen," Mr. Miner concluded. By John Palmer Many favorable things can be said about the Junior College movement. Probably the most potent argument its favor Is that the Junior Col- e does not have the varied social activities that are to be found in the four-year college. Junior Colleges have their social activities, of course, but not the organized form found in the universities in this country. One of these organized forms of social activities is the college Greek letter fraternity or sorority. It is true that these fraternities and sororities maintain high scholastic standards for their members, and thus actually assist in building up a school's reputation in that respect. However, it cannot he denied by anyone who lias lived in a university center for any length of time that it is extremely hard to keep up with the social activities of these specialized groups of students. The junior, senior and graduate students in these institutions learn how to select from these eo- lege functions the ones they wish to take part in. They learn how to fuse to accept invitations. They learn how to study when the rest of the "house" is at the picture show, engaging in a "bull-fest" or just "oul riding" It takes a lot more will power than 99 per cent of the freshman students enter college with, to say "no" when the temptation comes their way. College is new to them, and being away from home, they want new things, and usually find them. The fraternity lite of a university, it is true, does not offer all the distractions to be found in the school. A student 17 or 18 year old will find himself beset with all sorts of things that will interfere with his scholarship even If he stays at a boarding house or dormitory. The fraternity, however, offers e in the way of social life, ana consequently, in reality, does more harm for the students of the freshman and sophomore years, than good. It is true that most first-class universities do not allow their freshman students to become members of these organizations. Nevertheless, they are allowed to "p'edge" some fraternity or sorority, and in effect this amounts to the same as membership; that is, as far as social activities are concerned. Parents whose sons and daughters desire to go to college for the sole and only purpose of "rating" some such organiaztion will find that their boys and girls will probably get a college degree if they go to a junior college for the first two years. Students who have as their only aim the "rating" of a Greek letter organization, are usually back behind the plow when November mid terms are over. And students who have originally entered college with a high purpose, but who have been drawn involuntarily Into the social swirl of college in their second year, usually find themselves in weekly conference with the dean, if not in conference with the proprietor of the corner drug store back home. HJ.C. HAS LARGEST STATE ENROLLMENT Attendance Mark Double That of Other Junior Colleges Last year the Houston Junior College was the largest public Junior College In Texas, and today its enrollment almost doubles that of any other junior college of its kind in the State. One of the main features of this institution is that it is the only junior college operated at night in Texas, MANY COLLEGE STUDENTS, fl. J. Q. PRODUCTS MAKE] classes being held from 4 to 10 p. m. HOLD REGULAR POSITIONS GQ()D SH0Wm AT MCE^JT*' ^^ * While it is a well-known fact that e majority of the students of the Houston Junior College are earn- . part, if not all, of their expenses by working in the mornings, it is not so generally known that almost one- third of those enrolled are persons connected with various offices and organizations in full-time positions, who entirely support themselves and, in some instances, their families. Most of these students are taking, courses primarily for the pleasure and knowledge to be gotten and not to obtain credit. Many of them have attended other colleges and universities and wish to get additional credits. Some are college graduates who wish to take up some course they did not have in college, or to review courses that were especially interesting to them. Many are persons who, for various reasons, did not attend college and find in the Junior College an opportunity to renew their studies after their working hours. And, despite the fact that their or fice work takes up so much of their time, many of these students are abh to carry two, three, and in one or two instances, four, subjects, and to make high average grades as the usual j have mace good college student who is not working | none have failed outside of school. and held on only five days system which the Houston Indicative of the thoroughness of I Junior College was the first to adopt. State Recognizes— (Continued from page 1) cates were issued to Junior Colles' students by the State Department of Education at the end of the first year's work. . The issuance of teachers' certificates upon work done in junior College makes it possible for a number of those in Houston, who intend teach, to stay at home while getting their certificates, Instead of going away to another college or university. It is expected that a large number of certificates will be issued this spring and summer by the State Department of Education upon worn completed by students of Houston Junior College. Houston Junior College work is the fact that of the six students who went to Rice this year from Junior College not one has failed in a single subject. Out of 25 grades made there were two ones, four twos, fourteen threes, five fours and no fives. Only one student made as many as two fours. Two of these students entered the :econd year mathematics class at Rice, their first year Junior College math having been given full credit by Rice authorities. This is quite an honor for Junior College, as Rice does not always accept math credits from other universities or colleges in Texas. Former Junior College students who are now enrolled at Rice are: Louis Atmar Barnett, Mildred Louise Bra- man. Louis Bertrand Downing, Gladys Hitchcock, Para Lee Ingram and Janice Marshall. The good record being made by Junior College students at Rice Is also being carried out at the University of Texas. Six of last year's Junioi College students are now attending the University and so far all of them rage grades and This system is accomplished by having one hour classes in certain subjects on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and an hour and a half classes other subjects on Tuesday and Thursday, thus causing each class to average three hours per week. Figures issued at the end of the ■27-28 term show that the Junior College of Houston had the largest enrollment of any junior college of its kind and that it was well represented by local students. Considering that that year was the first regular session of the school, it was an unusually successful year, below Is a chart of the number of students enrolled in the other public junior colleges of the state during the year 1927-28, and the number of students enrolled in the high schools of those cities: Junior High College School students, students. Municipal College— ^ (Continued from page 1) Later in the year, the college was again inspected by the representatives of the Texas Association of Colleges and, at the meeting of the association the spring, the college was recognized as a class A junior college with no reservation whatever. This action means that the work done at the Houston Junior College is transferable at face value to all other Texas colleges, and that students from Houston and this section of Texas can do two full years of standard college work at home, which can be transfer- ed without loss to all the colleges having membership in the Texas Association of Colleges. At the summer school session of| 1928 there were 232 students registered. In the fall of '28, 663 students enrolled. During this year the school was again inspected and it was found that there had been many improvements made which increased the standing of the school. The summer session of the Houston Junior College, starting its third year, will open on June 3, when it is expected to have an enrollment even larger than that of the last two summers. PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM SUPPLIES ADMINISTRATORS Brownsville 112 Clarendon 65 Edinburgh 225 Hll'sboro 166 Houston . 461 Gainesville . . 54 Paris 201 Ranger .... .43 Temple 378 Houston Junior College has its advantages by being a part of the Houston Public School System, in that the instructors are doing work in the public schools, thereby cutting down the overhead expenses that would otherwise be paid out for instructors' salaries. Many instructors who teach at the Junior College, are teaching in tin; city's public schoo's. Mr. F. M. Black, Director of Houston's High Schools, is the Dean of the College, while N. K. Dupre, principal of Montrose Elementary school, is assistant dean. Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, Superintendent of the Houston Public Schools, Is connected with the College in the capacity of president, and Mr. H. W. South, Ifinstructor of Spanish at Sam Houston High School, is the registrar of the College. Mr. H. W. Harris, instructor in public speaking, and coach of debate, also teaches at Sam Houston High School. Mr. F. R. Birney, journalism instructor, teaches that subject at Sam Houston and San Jacinto Senior High Schoo's. Advantages such as these enable the Houston Junior College to offer a high type of Instructors in all departments. Tyler Texarkana . . San Antonio . South P'irk .. Victoria Wichita Falls .. 112 106 Status of— (Continued from page 1) fact that the students of the senioi high schools were graduating so young; that it was unwise to sena them away to college. Then, too, ambitious young people with limited finances called me constantly, asking for advice on their problem of attaining :i college education. Finally, the number of students leaving school forever, when only half educated, became so distressing that it was ultimately necessary to find a solution. Thus the Houston Junior College came into existence. I am quite proud of its progress and have every belief that its future Is spelled SUCCESS." Dr. Oberholtzer, one of the most brilliant men in the educational world, Is to be congratulated. Houston is proud of him and although we may brag on our Junior College president, can you biame us?
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