Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929
File 002
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929 - File 002. April 1929. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/109/show/106.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1929). The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/109/show/106

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929 - File 002, April 1929, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/109/show/106.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. II, No. 4, April 1929
Contributor
  • Shepperd, Louise
Date April 1929
Language English
Description From masthead: "Published Monthly by Journalism Students. Official Publication of Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript TWO Sljc (Unugar STAFF Editor Louise Shepperd Managing Editor Harry Se.iman ■Aaqoclate Editor Robert Tracy News Editor Margaret Boyett Departmental Editors Faculty Helen Chi...., Literary Louise HuGKins Special Articles Celia Lesky Editorial John Palmer Feature Romelda Sass THE COUGAR Dorothy Downrr.nn, .Mozart Hammond, Brine Jfanlpv, hYiinresi h*nsU>r, Catherine Plttger, Clifford Whitehead. Published Monthly by Journalism Students Official Publication of Houston Junior College A Reality By Celia Lesky Dreams often come true—usually after yeara of struggle and hardship. However, in the rapid strides made by Houston Junior College, Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, in the short span of two years, has seen the fulfillment of visions of a much needed institution in Houston—a Junior College. Just two years have elapsed sine*, the Houston public school system, at the urge of Dr. Oberholtzer, ventured a summer session of Junior College Immediately 233 students enrolled, and success was instantaneous. In the fall, classes were resumed with 461 students, double the summer enrollment. At present 663 students are taking advantage of the many opportunities afforded in Houston Junior College to continue their education. The majority of these students are employed during the day. Junior College offers all subjects on the curriculum of any accredited college. Affiliation was obtained in the first year, and a student completing the regular Freshman and Sop., omore courses will enter any college in the state as a fully accredited junior. Aside from the high standard set in all courses, Junior College is gaining recognition in athletic circles. Social activities, begun in the first year, have reached a stage of near perfection. The success of Houston Junior College is a fitting tribute to Dr. Oberholtzer, Mr. Black, Mr. Dupre and all others whose untiring efforts have made possible one of Houston's worthiest institulions, the Houston Junior College. Education By Helen Cheney. The training a person receives at the Houston Junior College in the education department is entirely practical, due to the fact that this college is part of the Houston Public School system. Junior College is a municipal democratic institution like the public schools and has for its central idea democratic state education. There are many advantages tending the summer session at this college. One of the most important is that It is located in a large city, making it possible for a student to secure a position and at the same time attend college. For a school teacher, the H. J. C. is the only institution in Houston ottering the education courses that are required before a person may enter ithe city system. During the past year many Rice Institute students attended the education classes here in order to fulfill ■the requirements for a teachers' certificate. The courses offered in Junior College deal directly with State retirements for obtaining a Texas state teachers certificate. The following courses will be offered in the Education Department at Houston Junior College summer session, beginning Monday, June 3. Education 113—123—for Freshman Certificate Education 213 — 223 — Sophomore courses that are lequired for all higher certificates. to wait until the high school classes are dismissed. This, however, has proven an set rather than a liability in that many of the students would be unable to attend classes were it not possible for them to obtain employment while going to college. Men and women who teach school during the day find it convenient to finish work on their degrees in classes at Junior College after school hours. Those students, now graduating from high school, who wish to work and attend college at the same time, will find the Houston Junior College the ideal place to go. Night Sessions The Houston Junior College, unlike other colleges, meets at night, thereby affording for those who find it necessary, an opportunity o[ working during the day. The reason for the night classes Is that during the day the building in which the Junior College meets is occupied by students of the San Jacinto High School and it is necessary for the members of the Junior College College Courses at Night By Louise Shepperd "But why do you try to go to night school?" "What do you expect to get out o; it, since you already have a good po- "Don't you find it too hard on you th your office work?" "And just what does it mean to you?" These ant! similar questions are constantly asked me by friends and acquaintances. And then usually begins a long argument in which I, at least, am never convinced that I am not right. For Junior College means a great deal to me, more than I can very well plain. I remember how eagerly I read some two years ago an editorial in one of the local papers on the establishment of a junior college for Houston. That was shortly before the first term opened and I had not heard of it before that time. The editorial gave the aims and purposes of the Junior College and remarked on the fact that fall classes would be held at night. That seemed to me almost too good to be true. For it was exactly what I had been wishing for, since I had started work. I had been anxious to attend college after finishing high school, but, as that was not possible, I took a business course and went to work. My work was interesting and I grew to like it more and more every day, but I could never quite forget that I wanted to do at least a year or two of college work. So it seemed that here was an answer to my problem. I could keep on with my work and at the same time take up one or two courses in the Junior College at night. After reading the editorial, I went to see Mr. South, who was so enthusiastic about ork to be offered that I became even more eager to get started. When the fall term opened I enrolled for two courses, which I continued through both semesters last year. Sometimes it was hard to keep ith the work for both classes, but it was always fun. And I got so much out of the courses that, although I could not attend the day c'asses in the summer, I enrolled for two night courses again last fall. And at the beginning of this spring term I enrolled for three. As I am office eight hours a day, I don't Iiavu a great deal of time to spend in studying but I do enjoy all my classes and get a great deal of good from them. Though I have made fairly good grades so far, I feel that, even if I should some time fail to pass a course the contacts made and the new ideas obtained in class work, would be worth far more to me than the time and effort spent. And, feeling this way, I intend to enroll again each year for as many courses as I can carry, thus getting at least a part of my college education. Assistant Dean PLANS FORMULATED FOR SUMMER TERM Assistant Dean Sees Large Enrollment of Teachers "Large e'asses are expected this summer," says N. K. Dupre, assistant dean. "The enrollment last summer practically uouniei! that of the year before and it will probably happen The faculty this summer will be practically the same as in the winter session wilh the exception of Mrs. Floy Soule, who will attend the University of Texas, and Miss Huberich, who will take a trip abroad. The registration dates are May 31, June 1, and June 3 as printed in the folders which have been sent to teachers of public schoo's and high school pupils. They will also be sent the special Issue of the Junior College paper and directions for application for next year. Exes Make Good That a very high scholastic standard is being upheld by Houston Junior College was proved by reports received about former students who now attending various other colleges. Of the six students having finished freshmen work here who entered Rice Institute, five passed in all their courses with good gades. There were two ones made, three twos, fourteen threes and five fours. Only one per- m made as many as two fours. The (th student withdrew from school. This indicates that our students are making an excellent showing at Rice so far. Six students are now attending the University of Texas and passing in all courses. RICE RECOGNITION IS ACCORDED H.J.C. COURSE Special arrangements are now being perfected whereby seniors at Rice Institute who expect to teach will be enrolled in the Junior College practice teaching classes during their senior year. Preference will be given to students who do this work, in the appointment of teachers in the city schools, according to Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, superintendent of Houston public schools. Those students doing this work will, upon graduation from Rice Institute, receive permanent state certificates. That the courses offered at Houston Junior College are of unusually high quality is evidenced by the recognition accorded such courses by Rice Institute. Well-known for its high scholastic requirements, Rice will give full credit for the courses ol only a few colleges in the state. Students from Houston Junior College who enter Rice are' giv^n full credit for each course completed at Junior College. And this is not the only way in which Rice acknowledges the thoroughness of Junior College work. Last year there were a number of students at Rice who wished to finish this spring, but who needed six or seven credits for graduation. Not being able to take so many courses in one year at Rice, they were allowed by Rice authorities to take one or two subjects at the Junior College during the last summer term. Full credit given them for these courses, they were able to take the remaining subjects at Rice this year, and are to be graduated in June. It is expected that a larger number will follow the same plan this year, and several have already arranged their schedu'es. Another interesting fact to note is that of the several last year's Junior College students who are attending Rice this year, none have failed. Some ! made excellent grades, and ail others have made good average grades. Faculty Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, Ph. D. M.A., LL. D., superintendent of the Houston Public Schools, is president of the H. J. C. Dr. Oberholtzer did his graduate work at Columbia University and is considered one of the most progressive educators in the country. Mr. F. M. Black, B. A., is the dean of the college and It is interesting to know that he has been connected with the public school system In Houston for twenty years. Mr. N. K. Dupre, M. A., graduate of University of Texas, is assistant dean of the college. Mr. Dupre has had ten years experience in administrative teaching in Texas Mr. H. W. South received his A.B. degree from the University of Virginia and has held the position of bursar since the college opened. Mrs. F. Lee Duggan, a graduate of Texas University, is registrar ana is also instructor in Spanish. Mrs. Duggan is a member of the Zeta Chapter of the National Spanish Fraternity. Mrs. Pearl Bender received her B. A. degree from Indiana University, and is the first Dean of Women at H. J. C. Mrs. Bender is also president of the Ninth District Texas Congress P.-T.A. MRS. PEARL BENDER Dean of Wo Mrs Hannah Shearer, librarian, is a graduate of Iowa State College. Mr. H. F. Ander is the head of the Biology Department and comes to us highly recommended from Rice Institute, where he received his M. A. degree. Mr. Samuel Bishkin, M. A., received his training in Chemistry at Rice Institute and in Eydlkuhneni, Germany. Mr. Fred R. Birney, instructor in Journalism and sponsor of the Junior College monthly newspaper, "The H. J. C. Cougar," received his B. A. de gree at Pomona College, California, and has done post-graduate work leading to the M. J. degree. Mr. H. W. Harris, head of Public Speaking, received his M. A. degree from the University of Texas. Mr. Harris is widely knowu as a public speaker and lecturer Mr. S. W. Henderson, M. A., is a graduate of Texas University and is considered an authority on subjects in the Education field. Miss May Bess Huberich, a teacher of English, comes to the college from Columbia University, where she received her M. A. degree. Mr. J. H. Ledlow received his M. B A. from the University of Texas and is at [.resent teacher of Business Administration and Economics. Miss Dorothy Mackey is instructor in Physical Training for Girls. Miss Mackey is a graduate of the New Haven Normal School for Gymnastics and was connected with the Y. W. C. Arbe/ore coming to H. J. C. Mr. M. A. Miller, M. A, is instructor in History and English and received his training at the University of South Carolina. Mr. W. H. Miner, M. A., comes to us from Columbia University. Mr. Miner has been engaged in education work in China for years. He is now an instructor in History at the college. Mr. W. L. Porter received his M. S. degree from the Texas A. and M. College Before becoming Mathe- instructor here he was connected with the same department at NIGHT CLASSES ARE SUCCESSFUL AT HIC. Junior College Is Ranked First Among Texas Institutions Night schools have been well- known institutions for many years. Obviously, they have been a success. Many people who would not othet- wise have had an opportunity to gain some sort of .education, were given this opportunity in the public night schools. Subjects taught in these institutions have ranged from a very lementary grammar-school education o a complete high school course. Of late, there has been another de- 'elopnient in the night school. Various schools of technology have been established, teaching spec ialized courses such as salesmanship, art, business management, drafting, ac- :ounting, and law. These schools are :!1 operated during the evening hours ind have also proven themselves very successful. But Is the junior college, operated during the evening hours, destined to be a success? Houston Junior College is the only junior college in Texas that holds its classes at night. With Houston Junior College still in its infancy, just barely two years old, what is its record? It ranks first among such institutions in the State of Texas. In other words, it has outclassed the other junior colleges of Texas, all of which are operated during the day hours—in its second year. The reason for this supremacy Is not hard to find. School teachers and working students, always the best part of any Institution of learning, predominate in Houston Junior College. Such students have a purpose in lew, and usually people with a purpose succeed—and we might adu, sehools that have people enrolled ho have a purpose always succeed. Houston's experiment is a success. r. C. B. Smith is a graduate of Texas University and has completed one year of work toward his Ph. D. degree. Mr. Smith is holding the position of Football Coach, Acting Dean of Men, Physical Education director for men, and instructor in History and Government. Mrs. Floy D. Soule, M. A., instruc tor in Spanish and French at the col- Mrs. Soule is a graduate of Texas University and has resided in Spanish speaking and Latin countries for several yeara. Mr. L. B. Fields, instructor In Engineering, is a graduate of Purdue University, and holds the B.S.E.E. degree from there. Mr. Fields is also Supervisor of Industrial Arts for the public schools of Houston. Mr. Alva Lee Kerbow, instructor In Education, received his M.S. degree in Education at the University of Oklahoma, and has had wide experience in administrative work in Oklahoma and Texas. * • * Miss Pearl Rucker, Instructor in Public School Art, received her Art Diploma at Baylor College. Miss Rucker is also Supervisor of the Art Department, Houston public schools. Miss Lula M. Stevens, instructor in Public School Music, Is a graduate of Chicago Conservatory of Music, and is also Supervisor of Music, Houston public schools.
File Name uhlib_10270243_v002_n004_002.jpg