Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 10, April 13, 1932
File 004
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 10, April 13, 1932 - File 004. April 13, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/104/show/103.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 13, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 10, April 13, 1932 - File 004. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/104/show/103

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 10, April 13, 1932 - File 004, April 13, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/104/show/103.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 10, April 13, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 10, April 13, 1932
Contributor
  • Marks, A.
Date April 13, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript PAGE FOUR THE COUGAR OUR SPORTING WORLD BY "RD?" HARRISON and JAMES JULIAN J. C. TANK TEAM Last Wednesday the Junior College swimming team bit off a little more than they could chew when they took on the fast San Jacinto swimming team at the San Jac. pool. Led by Crate, Barnett, Gardner, and Branum, the South Enders took all the events except the 100 yard backstroke which was won by Vernon Smith, Junior College star swimmer. Coach Hodges had a well balanced tank team, one which will be a strong contender in the city high school race. The J. C. squad was rather hastily organized with only a few having any practice and none sure of what races they were to swim in. Paul Gilder has charge of the team; others on the squad are Fred Aebi, breast stroke; Curtis Dunk, breast stroke; Vernon Smith, back stroke and dash; A. D. Morgan, distance; Harry Matthews, dash, and distance. LIFE SAVING Under the direction of Leroy Dailey and Paul Gilder, licensed Red Cross life savers, swimming and life saving classes have been organized among the Junior College students. Classes are held on every school day of the week with the girls swimming on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and the boys on tne other three. A total of thirty-five have signed up for the course of which one- half are out for the life saving badges. Dailey reports that the students are making nice progress with many ready to pass their tests. Coach French announced that the classes will continue until the end of the term and are open to all students interested. COACH BACK Coach Archie French had a short and unpleasant vacation last week when he was laid up with the flu. It was rumored on his first day of ab- - sence that "Coach had a light touch of influenza," but French hastens to assure us that there was nothing light about the touch and that he had a darn hard wallop that kept him flat on his back for three days. ROBIN HOOD'S RIVALS Classes in archery are the latest additions to the prograin of sports carried on by the girls' gym classes; and the Robin Hood spell seems to have hit the male spectators as well as the gymnasts. Several of the girls are quite adept with the bow and others are improving under the direction of Paul Gilder who introduced the sport and is directing the classes. Bob Brahnam and Gladys Jacobs staged an impromptu betting affair on each other's ability with the ow. Betting a nickle a shot, Mr. B. B. came out loser and refused to pay his bet claiming that it was all in fun. Whata- yasay Skinflint. SWIMMING STAR One of the most promising swimmers on the H. J. C. tank team is Vernon Smith, former Heights star, Smith is. built similar to Johnny Weimuller, king of swimmers, having the same wide shoulders, long arms, powerful shoulders and legs, and possesing the natural ability that goes with a good swimmer. Given a few years to develop his style and gain strength and experience Smith will go far in the aquatic sports. Swimming the 100-yar4 free style dash and the back stroke, Smith has been the mainstay on the J. C. swimming team. TENNIS BALLYHOO Junior College's tennis hopes have been in the hands of Bob Brahman and Dick Marshall who have recently won over the strong San Jacinto team. In two doubles matches Brahnam and Marshall, teamed together to turn back Hoi den and Armstrong of Sau Jacnto by the scores of 8-6, 7-5, in the first match and 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 in the final. The Junior College lads showed plenty of form in turning back the No. 1 South End team and are rounding into mid-season form. H. J. C. j will sponsor a tennis tournament soon and lots of interest should be shown considering the number of tennis stars at the school. All players wishing to compete in the coming tournament see either Bob or Dick. SOCK MARKET REPORTS BIG SUCCESS It is, indeed, very gratifying to the sponsors of the first boxing tournament to know how popular the bouts proved to be. At the conclusion of every match, the crowd showed their approval by hearty applause. The Cougar wishes to extend a vote of thanks to all participants who did much to make the show popular. The boxers were "Windy" Smith, Roger Bell, "Killer" Marmian, Loo Lurie, Allan Mills, "Coconut" Adams, Oscar Conroe, Bill Spitler, "Tiger" Green, Arthur Burns, Harold Bell Renfro, and Sam Tremonte. BURN'S MODESTY "Artful Art" Burns added much to the humorous side of the affair. Burns was scheduled to appear first on the card, but when the tme to begin arrived, Burns was fully clad in his street clothes. He vehemently refused to disrobe and attire in the customary fighting garb. However, when six or eight fellow boxers whispered words of courage and confidence in Burn's ear, he decided it was quite ethical to don shorts ir. front of the female spectators. Burns coyly said, "My hardest fight took place before 1 got in the ring." ABOUT LEON GREEN When the boys were being matched ■ before the fights, Leon Green was told who was to be his opponent. It seemed that his adversary was not quite so experienced along fistic lines as Green himself was. Green stated his preference of meeting a more worthy opponent. "I don't want to be at an advantage to anyone," said Green, "I would rather be at a disadvantage myself than to hold an advantage over anyone! And that dear readers is what you call sportsmanship. It its fellows like Green that makes athletics so popular. Once in the ring, there is no stopping to Green. Front the opening gong until the final bell the "Tiger" rushes and nails his man with lefts and rights to the head and body. Here's what his opponent said of "That guy Green is a human tiger. He hits hard, clean, and effectively. There is no stopping him; he is always on top of you shooting his dangerous left hooks and murderous right crosses. That guy is good." AMBITIOUS WINDY . Windy Smith is one boy who sure loves the game. After fighting three fierce rounds with "Slugger" Tremonte, he fought the final go with Bill Spitler. It seems that when wind got around that Spitler was in the contest, several of the battlers fearing hs reputation, headed for home and the high places. Spitler was rather disappointed in the fact that he was not going to have an opportunity to display his wares in the ring. But Windy wanting to keep the show running, agreed to tackle the much-feared Spitler. They fought three hair - raising rounds that had the crowd on their feet the entire length of the fight. Both boys are crowd pleasers and showed plenty of promise. They are due to do big things along the great fite way. RENFRO'S WISECRACKS In the semi-final "Bloody" Conro and "Sissy" Adams were doing their best to hammer each other into submission, but both are plenty clever and it was quite a task ot accomplish. In the last round both battlers were almost "winded" and the going had slowed down a little. Fred Aebi, Adam's manager, trying to encourage his man shouted, "Sock 'em Marion." Harold Renfro was quick to grasp the opportunity to insert a wise-crack and said "Whatcha trying to do, start a fight?" 500 SEE RING BOUTS ED CANDLER AND CY SHAW IN FEATURE Eight Bouts on Fight Card "They were just a bunch of palook- as," but they made a place for the trophy of pugilism in the sport annals of Junior College. They being the group of contestants who fought in the second H. J. C. Boxing Tournament, Friday night, in the main San Jacinto gymnasium. Cheered on by a wild crowd of 500 students and visitors that packed the gymnasium, the matches were reeled off in fine style with eight bouts totaling the number of fights for the night. There is a saying that the best is always saved for the last and this saying held true in Friday evening's fights. When two athletes, each weighing near 200 pounds, stand toe to toe and slug for all they are worth, something is going to happen; and that something did happen when "Silent" Cy Shaw, 185 pound oil field roughneck, won a decision over Ed Candler, 200 pound man-mountain from Heights, in the last and best bout of the night. Candler started off using long range blows with his weight behind them and had the "silent one" stepping fast. But Shaw had the goods and began to work under the Heights boy's guard, tearing away at his midsection and throwing hard rights at his face. With the first round a draw, both boys came out of their corners at the start of the second period a little tired but still in good condition. Shaw started a smashing attack that cut Candler's face and kept him on the defensive. As the round progressed Cy was connecting with heavy blows that had telling effect and won for him the decision. The Tremonte-Smith grudge fight turned out to be a nip and tuck affair after all. Tremonte had Smith badly beaten at the end of the first round, but the windy lad came back and fought his way to a draw. Loo Lurie and "Battling" Marmion put up a great exhibition. Lurie got the decision which was indeed hard to judge. Loo kept the crowd laughing wth his pet punch which consisted of drawing his right backward and downward until the mitt rested on the canvas and then delivering his "haymaker" swing. When it found its mark, the blow was effective. Marmion's best asset was his clever footwork. The first match of the evenng had all the appearances of a fast bout. Leon "Tiger" Green and Harry Matthews sped through the rounds and did plenty of fighting. Most of the bouts resembled a wrestling match with the boys clinching frequently and holding on for all they were worth. Matthew's habit of catching Green behind the head with his open glove and holding him made the "Tigerman" mad and gave the fight a humorous touch. All the arts of dodging and guarding were demonstrated by Harold Renfro in his battle with Irwin Urbantke. Ur- bantke led the fight all the way although he landed only a few solid blows and never had Harold going. Renfro kept up a back-pedaling, dodging fight, sneaking in a blow now and then but being obliged to fight on tbe defensive most of the time. Only once or twice did the boys come together and fight, but in these few mix- ups the fur flew thick and fast. Art Burns proved the fact that a man doesn't have to have strength to fight but can rely on his nerves and courage. In his fight with Oscar Con- roe. Burns was plenty willing to fight and the first round was fast and furious with both staging several toe to toe slugging matches. At times Burns would stage a quick rush that would catch Conroe off his guard, but these rushes had little effect as Conroe showed in the final round when he began to lead the fight and work on Burns. At the bell, Burns was pretty well shot while Conroe was still going strong, so the referee handed the decision to the capable Conroe. In what promised to be one of the best matches on the card Roger Bell took on Bert Mintz, popular Houston middle Weight', but the match only went one round. Mintz was on the receiving end of several hard blows that cut the inside of his nose and forced him to withdraw after the first round. Up until the bell both had shown plenty of form and had the crowd on their feet. "About what time does the sun set in the winter?" queried the teacher of the class. The smallest boy answered: "When our hens go to roost." A Lancashire man, who was a great rationalizer, fell ill. His messenger was seen running down the street in a great hurry, and on being asked what was the matter, replied: "Mr. So- and-So is ill." "Then I suppose you are running for the doctor?" "No," said the man, "we do not run for the doctor. We cut out the middleman. I ame going for the undertaker." Cohen and his family sat down to dinner on Sunday. To his three boys Cohen said: "Now children, which of you would vant it a nickel instead of meat for dinner?" Each of the three decided in favor of the cash settlement, so Mrs. Cohen put the meat away. Then she brought in the pie and put it on the table. "Now my children," inquired Cohen, "how many of you vant a nickel's worth of pie?" Old Lady: Where did you get all those niekles, sonnie? Windy: Down at the church. Old Lady: Did you steal them, you naughty boy? Windy; Oh, no; the minister said that this money is all for the heathens. Me and pa is atheists, so I took a handful. To Mr. Henderson, our Education Prof, In imagination our caps we doff. Slow and deliberate, always reserved, He never gets ruffled, he's never unnerved. His infallible judgment seldom is wrong, And he smiles to himself as he passes along. Planning our assemblies—his specific business: Most of them represent the acme of dizziness. He turns a deaf ear to the students' plea, "No reason for interesting programs," says he. He subjects us to boring, long-winded speeches; Not for entertainment, but the lessons they teach us. He feeds us statistics and similar bull, Cramming our minds that already are full. Now, in this brief span, filled with struggles and strife, "Variety," 'tis said, "is the spice of our life." But it appears, thus far, by logical reasoning, Our assembly programs have rather lacked seasoning. Minister: "And how high can you count, my little man?" Any Pell: "One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, Jack, Queen and King." Mrs. Dupre: "Dear, I saw the sweetest little hat downtown today." Dean: "Put it on, and let me see how you look in it." TJhf first and only time he ever Played basebav-l. HE PiTcrleD ACQ-HiT Ne-R-JN tfAME.'" WARREN A. REES INSTRUCTOR OF MATHEMATICS iHTHE H00.T0N JuKIOR. OUtGE. PtJENNlS, YACHT[NC_, RoWiNC^ /\MD SwiMMlHGr ARE H\"b FAVDR.tE SPORTS H can £at with Chopsticks/' ft LIVED IN FOOCHOW CHINA FOR NINE Yetars _ HE WAS known AS WAi-U <^>This- his signature //
File Name uhlib_10270243_v005_n010_004.jpg