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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 10, April 13, 1932
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 10, April 13, 1932 - File 002. April 13, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/104/show/101.

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(April 13, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 10, April 13, 1932 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/104/show/101

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 10, April 13, 1932 - File 002, April 13, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/104/show/101.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 10, April 13, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 10, April 13, 1932
Contributor
  • Marks, A.
Date April 13, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript PAGE TWO THE COUGAR THE COUGAR Of The Houston Junior College Houston, Texas Established 1928 Published semi-monthly during the college year. Subscriptions, $1 per year. Single copies, 10 centi. EDITORIAL STAFF vlanaging Editor A. Marks Assistant Editor L. P. Marshall News Editor Betty Covington Faculty Advisor Fred R. Birney DEPARTMENT HEADS Sports Editor V. F. Harrison Feature Editor James Julian Literary Editor Gordon Jones Humor Editor Ruth Depperman Exchange Editor .__ Wenonah Phelps REPORTERS Gladys Howard, James Page, N. C. Jensen, Herman Lewis, Wilma Lindsay, Walter Garrett, Grace Schoelman, Anna Sloane, lone Brown, L. Ray Pell, Mrs. Nannette Robinson, Frances Ne- imith, E. O. Boulet, Cy Shaw, Flossie ffhite and Gladys Jacobs. Everybody said, "No Minnie, no party," and went home. But the tragedy was not in vain. Minnie lives once again. Any member of the Pi Beta will fight at the sound of Minnie's name being used disparagingly. Her name is forever on the tip of the tongues of the Playboys who will always love and fight for the honor of her name. And that, dear readers, is why you may receive the answer of "Minnie" to any question asked by yourself. And as you read these lines, may a tear emit from your eye and you say, "Minnie first, Minnie last, and Minnie forever." YOUTH'S CHAMPION "Young people have not been corrupted by prohibition because young people are not corrupt." By making this sentence the keynote of his address, Dr. Daniel Poling proved beyond a doubt that the young people of today have at least one public champion. "Always the few make the noise that misrepresents the many" continued Dr. Poling. "It is true that the young people of today are faster than they were a generation ago—a.s a result of the machine age. Even the barnyard fowl lives faster than his ancestors did; if he didn't he'd never get across the road." Even (hough Dr. Poiing's address was primarily in defense of tne "dry" movement, there was throughout it a strong undercurrent showing his interest in, his love for, and his faith in the so- called erring generation. His sincere admiration for the youth of America even caused him to lack a certain amount of unity in his address. In his intense enthusiasm he could not let the opportunity slip by of showing one reason why he has no fears for modern youth. "In the 1400 letters that I received each week from ♦he Youth of America, the chief ques- ion that is asked is 'What must I do o improve myself, to succeed?' When he youth of a nation asks that ques- ion consistently, the future of that ,iation is secure." So many breathless observers of the present younger generation have said so much, written so much, and thought so much concerning the present lack of morals, the widening path to the dogs, et cetera, et cetera, ad infinitum, ad nauseaum, that there are few accusations left to be made. But Dr. Poling made one of that few. And, strange to say, it was not made to youth, but to youth's critics. Concise, brief and straight to the point, as well as straight from his heart, it was this: "Give the young people a good example instead of slander." COOPERATION Houston Junior College is cooperative. It believes in co-operation individually and collectively. That is, the College itself is a sponsor of cooperative educational movements; and it encourages co-operation of its pupils with pupils of other colleges, and with each other. This feature has been stressed by Dean N. K. Dupree, and other members of the faculty, and has been indelibly impressed upon us— anything to the contrary nothwith- standing. Collectively, this College is in hearty sympathy with the advancement and progress of all colleges, and it has for its aim a high standard of regard for educational research by all colleges, and in any branch thereof, and be it far from anyone connected with Houston Junior College to manifest anything save "kindliness to all and malice toward none." Individually, then, we, who are pupils of Houston Junior College, regard it a privilege to exhibit the same cooperative spirit this College stands for, and we are ready to join hands with our College Neighbors, the faculty, and each other, in carrying this, the first necessary step toward and recognition into effect. Sam Tremont displayed much courage in the recent boxing bouta, but last Friday he showed unequaled bravery. It was in Mr. Miner's history class. The good natured prof cracked one of his funny (?) stories and little Sammy uped and raised a window. Putrid. QUESTIONS 1. Where is the oldest state university in the United States? 2. Why has Boston no great skyscrapers? 3. Does the earthworm possess a gizzard? 4" How did the "Peeping Tom" tradition originate? 5. Are the front legs of a giraffe longer than the hind ones? 6. Where can you go fishing with a pitchfork? 7. Why doesn't February have thirty or thirty-one days like the rest of the months? 8. What does the crocodile use as a toothpick? 8. What product of coal is sweeter than sugar? 10. Where is the Sewanee River of the famous old song? 11. What animal flies? 12. Why does the United States import over 200,000 pounds of dandelion roots each year? 13. Who originated the custom of coloring and sending Easter eggs? 14. Where does cork come from? 15. In what free republic can no white man vote? 16. What is the first line of the famous poem, "Casabinaca?" 17. What animal walks on four legs in the morning, two at noon, and three in the evening? 18. What is the oldest of musical instruments? • WINCHELUNG ABOUT Do you rate around school? The answer lies in the fact have you, or have you not worn "Rip's" passion hat. Overnight it has become a popular fad to wear the wo rid-renown piece of head gear. Persons desiring to be privileged with the wearing should make application no later than a week in advance prior to the time desired. For a small fee students may have their names written on the hat. And believe me you, its a good way to get publicity. This L. Ray Pell belongs to the what- a-man class. He takes six subjects and has above s "B" average. Who said a freshman doesn't have brains? Run onto Lucille Cafcalas the other day riding down the Main drag in a Packard sedan; pea-green color. She give me a cool once-over and then flashed a knowing smile, that said, "Oh, look what I found." ... To all appearances the yo yo habit and roller skating craze have captured the Hait- chajaycee dopes . . . What the well dressed student will wear or introducing "Harold Renfro, who along with "Hamp" Robinson, is competing for the honors that go to the sheikiest looking chump. . . . John Hill wants to learn how to rat, but aside from Portia Garrot, he cannot find anyone that will teach him and, since he is in love with this "Throgmorton frail, well!! . . . These Pi Betas certainly do make the hops, parties, and etc. They have joined with the T. A. T. outfit and the result has been several hotcha affairs - ■ . Our math prof, Mr. Keeler or Alson to you, spends his spare time talking to his good looking female students, but the wise girls have already found that flirting does not help their grades in his classes. . . . Leroy Melcher brought a honey to Violet Herbert's party and did she rate? . . . And speaking of Violet; someone stole the front wheel off her four-tone- brown coupe. When the mechanic asked her if she had any insurance she said yes, but she meant life insurance. . . . Every day Art Burns gets a love note from a baby-faced brunette at San Jac. He's going steady from what we hear. . . . Talk about nerve. Bob Branham walked past the girls dressing room the other day and politely questioned if he could come in and take a shower. . . . The answer was yes. ANSWERS The recent boxing tourney held in the school gym proved such a success that more boxing shows are sure to follow. Coach French expressed his opinion that boxing has proved to be a better drawing card than either football or baseball among Junior College sport circles. Here's hoping they will have more as anything that is a crowd-gatherer is rare and merits much consideration. 1. University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia—chartered in 1785. 2. A limit of 125 feet is placed upon the height of buildings. 3. Yes. 4. The original "Peeping Tom" was a tailor who peeped through a hole in a shutter to watch Lady Godiva make her famous ride through the town, and who was struck blind as a consequence. 5. No, the legs are all the same length. The front legs appear to be longer because of the sharp slant of the body from the head downward to the tail. 6. Certain small streams in Vancouver Island and in Northern British Columbia are at times literally choked with salmon, and the natives simply toss them out upon the banks with pitchforks. 7. It did have until Julius Caesar and Augustus each "stole" a day for their respective namesakes, July and August. 8". A bird of the plover family picks particles of food from the croeodil's teeth when its mouth is open. 9. Saccharine, 10. A small, unimportant and not especially beautiful stream in Florida. 11. The bat. 12. Because the root is used for medicinal purposes. 13. The Persians, it is thought—the eggs being symbols of new life, coloring them red symbolizes the blood of, redemption. 14. From the rough bark of the cork oak. 15. Liberia. 16. "The boy Stood on the Burning Deck." 17. Man (this is the famous "riddle of the Sphinx.") 18. The drum. We farther note with interest that Marion "Coconut" Adams still makes his weekly trip to Saratoga to hunt. Coconut takes his gun with him now to avoid suspicion, but after making the trips all winter he has his first time to bring home any game. Poor shooting, we would say. COUGAR SCIENTISTS The Cougar Scientists, through the following article, give us some interesting facts in the scientific field. The Cougar wishes to encourage contributions of this nature. Let's hear from you again. Scientists! fEditov's Note.) Assistant Editor Herman Lewis Chemistry Amos Beeler Physics and Biology ... P. L, Cooper, Jr. ior Fred Page English Correspondent .Louise Morgan Sponsor _ S. L. Bishkin "MINNIE" No doubt, during the past week or .wo you have been burdened with distracting sounds that closely resemble 'Minnie the Moocher." If you haven't you're lucky—if you have you probably wondered why everyone picks on Minnie. Here's how it started. It seems that a certain clique of students have banded themselves into a club. The club members were gathered at a party and were fully enjoying themselves until the wailing strains of "Minnie the Moocher" pierced the air. The crowd went crazy about Minnie. From that time on until the party disbanded, the phonograph worked double time to keep the tune ever present. Finally the needle on the machine cut the record in two and the party became without life. QUICK FREEZING SOLVES FOOD PROBLEMS Wouldn't it be great to be able to >e some of the carbon dioxide (CO-2) which is found so plentiful in the air when so great an amount is wasted annually? If one could utilize some of this waste CO-2, he could save money, but how could he do so? What could he use it for? Some wise person had these thoughts in his mind and experimented. He found that by letting carbon dioxide escape quickly from a very compressed supply, so compressed that the CO-2 was a liquid, it would solidify very, very easily. When the CO-2 became a solid, it was frozen, so to speak— its temperature being some 56 degrees below zero. Upon observing this fact, chemists thought of commercializing CO-2 for refrigeration. They have commercialized it, and now CO-2, known as "Dry Ice," is used extensively in shipping foods from one place to an- Fish have to be kept at a very low temperature in order to prevent them from spoiling in transit. Dry Ice has such a low freezing point that it is a preferable refrigerant for preserving fish. From experiment, it has been found that foodstuffs containing much water, when frozen slowly, tend to spoil more quickly than if they were frozen rapidly. The accountable reason is that when freezing takes place slowly, the crystals of frozen matter are very large and few in number. When these crystals are large, they tend to break the flesh apart, thus causing it to deteriorate. To check this, some agent with a very low freezing point must be used. Foodstuffs are frozen by CO-2 in forty minutes; whereas, by ice, in twenty-four hours. Dry Ice passes directly from the solid to the gaseous condition, and surrounds the material to be frozen with an insulating atmosphere of dry gas; thus the liquid stage is omitted and another important problem has been solved. TEARS A POWERFUL GERMICIDE Tear drops may mean sorrow, but chemically they are a blessing. Tears are composed of a chemical called "lysozyme," which is probably the most powerful germ killer known. Frederick Ridley, of the Royal Society of Medicine in London, experimenting with human tears, has found that one teaspoonful of the pure chemical contained in them has antiseptic powers equal to more than a hundred gallons of salty water against a certain eye bacteria. The same substance, he says, can be found in the white corpuscles of the blood which continually wage war on destructive bacteria invading the body. Eventually it may be possible to extract the powerful chemical in sufficient quantities from animal bodies to place it in general use as a non-poisonous antiseptic. WHAT DOES CHEMISTRY MEAN TO ME? "What does chemistry mean to me?" said Mr. Narrowhead as he looked at this page, printed with ink made by a chemical process, on paper made by a chemical process. As he pushed back his cuff, bleached by a chemical process, and laced his shoes, tanned by a chemical process, he glanced through a pane of glass, made by a chemical process, and saw a baker's cart full of bread, leavened by a chemical process, and a draper's wagon delivering a parcel of silk made by a chemical process. He pulled out his pencil, made by a chemical process, and wrote a reminder in his notebook bound by imitation morocco, made by a chemical process. He rang a bell, the energy for which was supplied by a chemical process, and asked the office boy to get him some Texas figs, the quality of which had been improved by a chemical process. Mr. Narrowhead then straightened his tie which was dyed by a chemical process. Finally, upon receiving the figs, he bit one of them with disgust and yelled "Chemistry doesn't mean a thing to me!" If more of us really knew the significance of chemistry in our daily life, how packed the chemstry classes would be with eager students. This is a chemical age, why not study some chemistry? DIAMONDS WILL SOON BE WORTHLESS It happens that one peculiar property of carbon prohibits the making of large, clear, artificial diamonds more perfect than most of the natural ones. This property is that of being made volatile, or being changed directly from a solid to a gaseous state; which means simply that the melting point of carbon is higher than the boiling point. Now, theoretically, if we could increase the pressure on heated carbon, so as to raise the boiling point so high that it will be above the melting point, a crystal clear liquid would be found, which on cooling would crystallize out as large, transparent, sparkling diamonds. However, while scientists have not succeeded in doing this on a large scale, they have been successful in making small microscopic diamonds by following this theory. The French chemist, Moissan, did this by the following process. He compressed pure charcoa (made from charred sugar) into a soft iron cylinder, and sealed the cylinder. The cylinder was then packed into a carbon crucible with charcoal and heated for a few minutes at the enormous temperature of 4000 degrees Centigrade by means of an electric arc. Then the fiery mass was plunged into cold water in order to cool it quickly. This action required great courage on the part of Moissan, because molten iron often explodes violently under such conditions. The iron cylinder was so hot that it remained red for several minutes while in the water. The outer layer of iron solidified before the inner part and tus formed a hard cap on the cylinder. Now, since iron expands on passing from a liquid to a solid state, the inner portions attempted to expand on cooling, but due to the hardened outer shell they could not, and as a result, tremendous internal pressure was formed. This pressure caused the carbon, which had dissolved in the. molten iron, to crystallize out in the form of very small diamonds. These were removed from the iron by treatment with nitric iron which dissolved the iron. Scientists believe that the diamonds of nature were made by a similar process, only on a much larger scale. Nevertheless, it is probable that diamonds will be as common and worthless as glass in the future when a process is developed whereby they can be made larger and cheaper.
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