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Houstonian 2005
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Houstonian 2005 - Community. 2005. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 2, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/9125/show/9066.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2005). Houstonian 2005 - Community. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/9125/show/9066

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 2005 - Community, 2005, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 2, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/9125/show/9066.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2005
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 2005
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 2005, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • school yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Community
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_2005_176.jpg
Transcript Story by Jenna McManus A pair of leconstructed houses on Montrose Boulevard have attracted the eyes of passing Houstonians and set a new standard for temporary public art. e're not in Kansas anymore. It's hard to miss the artistic vision of Houston sculptors Dan Havel and Dean Ruck: two adjacent houses on Montrose Boulevard that look as though a tornado cut through their centers, pulling the wood siding into a large hole while leaving the outside shells of the houses intact. Inversion is a temporary exhibit celebrating the history of the houses, which have hosted thousands of students taking classes at the Art League of Houston. Because the piece isn't permanent - the houses will be demolished to make way for a new Art League facility - the viewer is forced to experience Inversion differently than he or she would traditional art. The momentary aspect of the project leaves a stronger memory of the houses rather than making them part of the everyday Montrose scenery. "My initial reaction upon seeing the house was that it looked like a really neat construction. I saw the picture online and I didn't think it was quite as elaborate as it looked" Jay Nielsen said. "The house is a piece of art!' Inversion took 300 man-hours to build, which turned out to be about four weeks for Havel and Ruck. The purpose of the project was to use condemned buildings as sculptural art. To build it, Havel and Ruck peeled off part of the houses' exterior siding and used it to create a narrowing spiral passage through the buildings, connecting them through a courtyard. It's one thing to look at a picture of the houses, but seeing them in person is completely different, which probably explains the scores of Houstonians who have stopped to stare at and take pictures of the houses this spring. Standing in the cortex and seeing how each and every board is used to make the artists' vision come alive is truly the experience of a lifetime. 198