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Houstonian 2001
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Houstonian 2001 - Community. 2001. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/8890/show/8791.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2001). Houstonian 2001 - Community. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/8890/show/8791

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 2001 - Community, 2001, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/8890/show/8791.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2001
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 2001
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 2001, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • school yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Community
File Name yearb2001180.jpg
Transcript A krewe throws beads to anxiously awaiting fans at one of the many Mardi Gras parades. Photo by Pin Lim >eads are a hot commodity at Mardi Gras. Parade JLlwatchers stretch to get as many as they can. Photo by Will Cordray A little girl gets a boost from her dad so that she can catch beads. Photo by Pin Lim Floats, heads and costumes draw thousands of Houstonians to Galveston to celehrate Mardi Gras The floats and costumes that define Mardi Gras rolled into Galveston again in February to help welcome in "Fat Tuesday!' The traditional holiday celebrated in a lot of Southern states, but of course the most famous Mardi Gras celebration is found in New Orleans, Louisiana. But, Galveston throws a great celebration as well. Shouts of "Throw me something, Mister" could be heard all along The Strand as a parade of beautifully decorated floats and lively bands passed by throwing beads, cups and doubloons. For those who work up an appetite at the parade, a lot of traditional cajun and other kinds of food were on hand. There were also plenty of beverages made available to wash down all the great food. One of the most important foods at mardi Gras though is the King Cake. Tradition states that if you find the baby king in your piece of cake, you have to buy the next cake. Mardi Gras has a long history in this country. The festival first came to New Orleans through its French heritage in 1699. Throughout the years, Louisiana natives have added to the festivities by creating krewes (organizations] that host parades and balls. The krewes elect a king and a queen that reign over the parade. When the SBBBS^rV , ■ 1 |284| Community Bv: Ashly Alberto parade is over, the krewe throws a ball where the king and queen are introduced. Typically, a parade consists of 15 floats and each float has its own theme. The floats are elaborately decorated with all kinds of colors and material. Mardi Gras means "Fat Tuesday" and that is the official day of the celebration. But the parades start two weeks before Fat Tuesday. Fat Tuesday can be on any day between Feb. 3 and Mar. 9, depending on the Catholic Church because it is 47 days before Easter Sunday. UH senior English major Ed De La Garza likes the fact that it is a two week celebration. "A lot of festivals come and go in a day or a weekend. Mardi Gras is like a two week party!' Some of the fun of Mardi Gras is dressing up. Mardi Gras gives Houstonians a chance to dress in wild outfits and have fun. Masquerade balls have always been a part of the Mardi Gras tradition and are often held at various times throughout the two week festival. Mardi Gras has often been referred to as the "biggest free show on earth!' With thousands of Houstonians flocking to Galveston every weekend to check out the parades and parties, it is easy to see how Mardi Gras got that name. Elvis impersonators dress up for the Mardi Gras fun. Photo hy Pin Lim Morai Gras |285"