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Houstonian 2001
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2001 - Community. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 30, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/8890/show/8786.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2001 - Community. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/8890/show/8786

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 2001 - Community, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 30, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/8890/show/8786.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2001
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Community
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb2001175.jpg
Transcript Houstonians take out the old and hring in the new in the year or the Snake The Houston community rang in the new year of the snake by celebrating the Chinese New Year with week-long festivities around town. For more than 30 years, Houstonians have gathered throughout the greater Houston area to celebrate the Chinese New Year with a festival. This years festival opened with activities such as the performance of the lion dances, the Miss Chinatown U.S. pageant, a ceremony honoring the snake and more. The celebration continued with a parade that attracted more than 50,000 people. Since 1912, the Chinese have observed the Chinese lunar calendar as the beginning of the year. The year has 354 days and 12 lunar months, half of them 30 days and the other half 29 days. The months correspond to the movement between the earth and the sun and observe the Chinese Zodiac Signs. The new year can begin anytime from Jan. 1 to Feb. 19, depending on how the cycle falls. Many traditions accompany the Chinese New Year. The Chinese New Year is a 15 day celebration and during that time it is bad luck to sweep your floors because it is believed that you are essentially sweeping out all of the good luck. It is also good luck to decorate the house in red decorations because red is a good luck color. At celebrations for the new year, fireworks are Chinese New Year would not be complete without an authentic Asian market, such as the one set up in Sharpstown Mall where Houstonians shop. Photo by Ashly Alberto Bv: M ichel le Norton often shot off and loud music is played because they scare off the new year demon. Senior music major Pin Lim says these traditions help to bring in the new year. "The essence of Chinese New Year is old debts are forgotten and we start fresh. Relationships between family and friends are renewed!' Lim said. As a zodiac sign, the snake represents those people who were born in 1929, 1941, 1953, 1965, 1977, 1989, and 2001. People born under the sign of the snake are considered deep, determined in whatever they do and financially secure. Houstonians continued their tradition of observing the Chinese New Year by kicking off the festivities with the ceremonial silken lion head dances and popping of the fireworks. Dragon head dances were performed throughout the Houston area in shopping centers, public parks, Houston streets and museums. One such performance held at Sharpstown Mall was accompanied by drums and cymbals, the dancers carefully moved the dragon up and down to make it come to life. The Chinese New Year gave Houstonians an opportunity to celebrate a culture that they may have known very little about. It gave them a chance to welcome the year of the snake. |t| Community undreds of Houstonians showed up at Sharpstown Mall to celebrate the Chinese New Year. Photo by Ashly Alberto Traditional dances are performed to help celebrate the New Year. 'hotohy Ashly Allierto The lion weaves its way around the stage in celebration of the new year. Traditionally, the lion appears at noon on New Year's Day. Photo by Ashly Alberto Cfunese New Tear _|275