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Houstonian 2001
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Houstonian 2001 - Community. 2001. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 4, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/8890/show/8783.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2001). Houstonian 2001 - Community. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/8890/show/8783

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 2001 - Community, 2001, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 4, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/8890/show/8783.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2001
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 2001
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 2001, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Community
File Name yearb2001172.jpg
Transcript Students lined up in the University Center to register to vote in the 2000 election. Photo by Pin Lim AUH student places her ballot in the box after voting at the NAACP earlv votina center Photo hv Pin 1 Rick Noriega answers question from a Telemundo reporter after winning a seat in the Texas Senate. Photo by Chris Gal loway Electi The votes have heen cast, hut who is the next president or the United States? Election 2000-the longest election in the history of U.S. elections. It was one of the toughest decisions America had to make and finally a group of seven Justices had to decide who the most powerful man in the world was going to be. Despite the quagmire of electoral problems that it created on Nov. 7, the issues reigned supreme for voters. Social security, appointment of Supreme Court justices and for most at the University of Houston-college funding. During the campaign, candidates Vice President Al Gore and Texas Governor George W Bush projected most issues to be "elderly friendly" like social security and medicare. However the young people were listening. "If I give up on social security now, it would be gone forever!' said 19-year-old Xavier Odili, secretary of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars and a sophomore in biology. The vice presidents stance on this issue was to keep Social Security within the federal government, use the federal surplus to pay down the debt and use the interest saved to keep the fund solvent. Governor Bush said "Give Americans more freedom to manage their Social Security.' His plan was to privatize the fund and allow investing an unspecified amount of payroll taxes in the stock market. William Banks, a political sophomore favored Gores plan. "My father lost his job because of the Reaganomics, so we must By! Koiuidle Ajirwatham keep social security secure!' he said. Another burning issue was the new appointment of the Supreme Court Justices. "When we have a written constitution we don't need the judiciary to govern us" said Garret Tuttle, a political science freshman, who opposes an activist judiciary. The new president could appoint at least four new justices to the Supreme Court. The U.S. Supreme Court is compromised of nine justices who are appointed for life. Easier access to college aid was another very important issue. Most young undergraduates at UH favored Gore on this issue as they felt he would follow Clintons policy of giving tax breaks for a college education. "Gores slogan, 'Whose side are you on? The people or the powerful?' told me that he will support a low-income guy like me to get an education',' said education major, Brian Deals. Third party candidate Ralph Nader found support in the UH campus. Unlike the other candidates, Nader visited the campus twice, first during the primary elections in the the spring and then in Oct. Like the rest of the country, Nader netted in the students who were disillusioned with the mainstream parties. "We are more liberal and we are sick of corporate money mnning our country,' said Brian Harrison, a history sophomore. But after all was said and done, it was George W. Bush that won the presidency. 268\ Community Supporters of Ralph Nadar and the Green Party watch the election results on television. Photo by Pin Lim Eteetion 2000 269