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Houstonian 2003
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Houstonian 2003 - Community. 2003. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 6, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/8611/show/8550.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2003). Houstonian 2003 - Community. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/8611/show/8550

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 2003 - Community, 2003, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 6, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/8611/show/8550.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2003
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 2003
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 2003, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • school yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Community
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_2003_103.jpg
Transcript BEACH CLEANUP Surfside resident David Fields cleans up trash from surfside beach on a sunny afternoon in April. "I do this because it's my way of giving back to the community," said Fields. Cleanups were a big part of community volunteering, especially around the volunteers own neighborhood. -Dixie Ann Dalton BOOKSTACKING Margaret Farmer and children's librarian Attis Dan ford seperate books for the Houston Public library in their free time. Volunteers found giving up thier free time to do some good made them feel better about themselves and also served a purpose for the better of society. -Dixie Ann Dalton Volunteering HOUSTON HAS VARIETY OF VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNIES Whether they were busy packing books for the Houston Public Library, cleaning up the beach for the Texas-Adopt-a-Beach Organization, or acting in a play to spread the word about the horrors of torture in other countries, volunteers in the Houston area kept themselves busy. Because of the fact that Houston was such a huge city, there were many opportunities for volunteers. They always took time out to recognize the people who made the donations, and of course, the small population of people who volunteered. Without those volunteers, most organizations would be lost, broke, and unable to function. Some organizations and groups advertised to obtain good, dependable, hard working volunteers. Other volunteer positions were filled by word of mouth. "Volunteer Houston" was a group that kept up with the events and necessities of many organizations that were in need of volunteers. By viewing their web site, www.volunteerhouston.org, prospective volunteers could find out a great deal of information on different Houston area groups in need of help. "Volunteer Houston's main goals were to develop, support, and promote volunteerism. This [the web site] makes it easy and convenient for the volunteers, which leads to repeated volunteer efforts. The easier we make it for people to volunteer, the more times they show up," said Recruitment Director Walter Black. Other opportunities included NOTPLAYING Amnesty International volunteers perform Torture Watch, an awareness play for human rights in front of a audience at Houston's St. Thomas University. Amnesty International was known for its campaigning for international human rights and awareness. -Dixie Ann Dalton /mmmMmumM candystriping (volunteering at hospitals), feeding the homeless, or even starting funds for those in needs. Churches organize such opportunities as well. For instance churches usually clean up highways for "Adopt a Highway mile" to reduce litter on the roads. Most people that volunteer feel like they are giving back to society what they can on their free time. Many people found time to give on the weekends while others gave time later in their lives during the retirement years. One resale shop takes church volunteers that offer any time they can to load, stock and cashier merchandise at the store "Good Samaritans's proceeds go to Methesda to help those less fortunate. My husband and I are retired and have had a good life, so we want to help others have a happier life too. We have more than enough blessings and we want to share them,' said Good Samaritan volunteer, Deloris Weide. People volunteer for many different reasons but mainly to give back what the are lucky to have. Some even refuse to work jobs that don't give back to others, even though they know the pay isn't high. "I want to teach. There are so many children out there that need the love I received as a child and I want to be one of the people that does that," said Senior psychology major Jessica Molina. -Dixie Ann Dalton Many organizations survive off their donations and government funding. Much of Houston's greatest aspects, like the Medical Center were supported by donations. irnmrnw^Jimmrm