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Houstonian 1976
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1976 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/7949/show/7683.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1976 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/7949/show/7683

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1976 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/7949/show/7683.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1976
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1976_104.jpg
Transcript Issue / The Next Decade MISSION SELF-STUDY It happens at every unversity, and it happens every 10 years at UH. But the self-evaluative report prepared by the Steering Committee for the Mission Self-Study in late 1975, unlike similar statements, had a much greater impact than its authors had ever envisioned. The mission's final effects, misinterpreted by many, wouldn't fully surface for years. The intent in formulating an official campus strategy for the future centered around the submissionof the document to the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools for reaffirmation of accreditation. As director of the Self-Study, Dr. Wallace I. Honeywell supervised the Steering Committee as it drew up both preliminary and final reports. "I think one of the most difficult areas we dealt with was trying to fashion a mission for this campus when there was not a clearly defined mission for the University of Houston," Honeywell told a Cougar reporter. The preliminary report, issued in Sept. 1975, recommended surprisingly broad changes in the university system intended to provoke campus response. Among them were these suggestions: :::Limit enrollment on central campus to 30,000 ^Increase the emphasis on research * Broaden the university's service beyond localities * Extensively evaluate teaching methods and performances Weeks of campus community hear ings following its presentation failed to evoke a substantial amount of organized opposition among rank and file students. The greatest vocal dissatisfaction came from faculty members and minority advocates. So while a final report was in the makings, UH students remained essentially uninformed and uninterested about its implications. When President Hoffman released the second study in mid-January, the original objectives had undergone extensive elaboration. The controversial recommendations immediately spurred responses from almost all areas of the university. Viewed as most threatening were: "Upgrading student retention standards "Immediately imposing 30,000 enrollment ceiling ''Creating 'flagship' system of UH campuses, with central unit having primary emphasis on research and advanced graduate work "Relocation of Business Technology bachelor program to the downtown campus and the phasing out of the Home Economics degree in keeping with the flagship concept Hoffman discontinued the community hearing method of discussion and asked that all responses be submitted to him in writing. The Student Senate sponsored a Teach-in to clarify the meaning of the document in the minds of suddenly-curious students. A major focus of disagreement concerned the enrollment ceiling and its effect on the availability of education for minorities. Prior to Hoffman's presentation of the plan to the Board of Regents for approval, last-minute opposition leaders included students, faculty and state legislators. The climactic board meeting was broadcast both by Houston media and KUHT closed circuitry to 600 spectators in Ezekiel Cullen auditorium. Upstairs Hoffman presented the report with his personal recommendations, significantly altering the Steering Committee's suggestions. Changes made and finally approved with the entire report recreated the Home Economics department and graduate programs in English and history. Hoffman did agree with the Business Tech relocation and the enrollment ceiling, but assured that, "no admissions policy changes shall be recommended or approved which in any way jeopardize the fair and equitable treatment and encouragement of any qualified applicants to the University of Houston." The approval by the Regents didn't squelch the issue, however. The Steering Committee remained in existence to create a procedure for regularly monitoring and assessing goals. The enrollment ceiling lingered on as a subsequent Students' Association campaign issue, and the programs to be immediately affected by the plan nervously awaited the first official blow. uh