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Houstonian 1995
The Issues
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1995 - The Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5767/show/5484.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1995 - The Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5767/show/5484

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1995 - The Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5767/show/5484.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1995
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb1995011.jpg
Transcript POINT / COUNTERPOINT Symbol of History or Symbol of Pain My great great great-gran ther fought in the Civil War on the Confederate side. He believed so much in the southern ways that he left his family for two-plus years to fight for what he believed in. What he believed in was states rights. He didn't want a federal government telling him what he should do with his land. This is what he believed in and this is part of my heritage. True the Civil War was fought over slavery, but it was not totally fought in the name of slavery. My great great great grandfather did not feel that a federal government would best serve his needs. True he also thought that slaves should be treated as property. But this part of my heritage I have fought with my entire life and just take it that I can not change the past. The conferderate flag was part of this culture. It was a part of culture that half of the country believed in. Justy like the star of David is representative of the Jewish culture, the confederate flag is part of my culture. Many African Americans feel that to raise the confederate flag is offensive. Whether or not it is offensive it is part of my heritage and therefore should be representative of southern history. Now the Klu Klux Klan wave this as a symbol of racism. They have totally taken this symbol of southern history out of context. I do not stand behind their beliefs of racism, but I feel that there is no shame in the confederate flag. I feel that if the KKK did not use this flag as one of their symbols of racism, then it would be accepted as part of history. I do not wave it or wear the confederate flag as a symbol that defines who I am, but I do accept it and cherish it as my culture. Sure the South has had its dark days but people are forgetting that a new south has risen, where blacks and whites do not have to recognize each other by the color of their skin but they can both together celebrate their southern heritage. -Shyla Tompkins Dominique Dawes won the gold medal and the U.S. National Title in gymnastics this year. She executed an almost flawless routine in front of an enthusiastic crowd, seasoned judges... and the Confederate Flag. Seeing that flag in the background as an African American woman performed in a national, not Southern, competition was a slap in the face of many African Americans. Despite the claims that the Confederate Flag represents Southern pride and tradition, for a multitude of African Americans it means nothing of the sort. To us, it symbolizes a time when our ancestors were continuously and ruthlessly robbed- of their dignity, of their rights, of their lives and sometimes, even of their very souls. I am Southern- by birth, by style, by attitude. I was born in Louisiana and have lived there all my life. 1 am proud of the genteel ways that exist down here, of the friendliness of my neighbors, of the slower pace of our lives. All these are aspects of the "Southern Tradition" that we hear so much about, something we can all identify with. So how can a flag that was used to keep a whole race of people enslaved, a people that comprised a significant part of the South, be representative of anything but hatred? Supporters of the Confederate Flag claim that it was not a banner for slavery, but a symbol for preserving states' rights. It's strange how easy it is for them to forget that one of those states' rights that was to be defended was the right of the South to continue its inhumane institiution of slavery. As a Southerner, I feel no pride when I see that horrible flag. In fact, that symbol of racism and degradation can usually be found at Ku Klux Klan rallies and anywhere bigots gather to bemoan the fact that people of color might actually be given a fair chance. And yet, it is not the KKK or bigots who worry me. Their positions are made clear. It is the clean-cut, young, white Southern men who stand behind that flag and claim Southern pride. These young men aren't necessarily racist, but often just ignorant- or uncaring- of what the Confederate Flag means to a whole race of people. It is this ignorance that allows misunderstandings and hatred to be perpetuated from generation to generation. So why do we make such a big deal about the Confederate Flag, an emblem of "Southern pride," a sign of the "glory days" of the South long gone? Because that is not what that flag represents. It represents the endless pain, the incessant tears of my people. It represents a time when we were no more than property. It represents centuries of humiliation and heartbreak, brainwashing and body-breaking, unheard cries and ignored suffering. It symbolizes an era when "man's inhumanity to man" reached its pinnacle. So each time I and millions of African Americans see that flag and we shudder or frown or shake our heads, please don't say that you don't understand why we can't let the past go. The strength it took to overcome that past helps define us. The chains that held us in that past still entrap us. The pain of that past still holds us. And the symbols that allowed that past to be so brutal- symbols like the Confederate Flag- still haunt s us. -LaGuana K. Gray Houstonian 1995 14 I The Issues 15