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Houstonian 1998
People
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Houstonian 1998 - People. 1998. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5397.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1998). Houstonian 1998 - People. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5397

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1998 - People, 1998, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5397.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1998
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1998
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1998, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • school yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title People
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb1998178.jpg
Transcript Lois Zamora Lois Zamora entered the room with an extra slice of cookie cake from a department birthday celebration. "We look for any excuse to have a party here," Zamora quips while offering the food. From the beginning it's obvious why she is leading the largest college at UH — her enthusiasm is contagious. "There's no way I'm going to be able to eat my tuna fish lunch after this." Zamora assumed the role of dean of the College of Humanities, Fine Arts and Communication in 1996 following 20 years teaching in the Department of English. Her professional accomplishments are numerous — membership in Phi Kappa Phi and Omicron Delta Kappa, and honors including the Greenwood Community Service Award from the Houston City Council and a Distinguished Service Award from the National English Honors Society. Zamora earned a Bachelor of Arts degree with honors in English from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in comparative literature. Beyond the budgets, the meetings, and the red tape, Zamora has a passion. In an essay addressing the importance of liberal education, she writes, "A liberal education — long considered impractical — has now become highly practical because it provides the basis for intellectual flexibility, critical thinking, and a lifetime of learning." According to Zamora, developing a broader based education is a powerful tool no matter what specialty a student is enrolled in. Liberal arts helps students develop not only mentally, but morally — lessons applicable to any walk of life. By providing a liberal education as well as specialized instruction, students will be better prepared for the future. "We know our students will change careers an average of four times during their working life," Zamora said. In summer 1997, the Texas Legislature called for an overhaul of higher education core curriculums, recommending 42 hours. UH's current core consists of 56. Many UH students particularly dislike the required 12 hours of English — most other Vs Texas universities require six to nine. But Zamora said the courses are needed, but perhaps they can be —' more specialized. "We are going to have to move towards more emphasis on writing within the majors. Accountants write and talk differently than poets," she said. Matt Mallay, a senior journalism major, agrees with Zamora. "I believe a strong command of language is very important, but the current requirements seem a bit much," he said. A large, liberal based, core curriculum has other major critics, often including university financial officers. "It's expensive to teach undergraduates to write, speak and think critically, because these skills can only be taught in small classes and with careful guidance and personal attention from faculty," Zamora said. As UH's core curriculum is re-evaluated, students and faculty can expect to find Zamora arguing to continue the liberal arts curriculum. "Our challenge will be to maintain our parallel commitments to specialized training in the individual disciplines and to the breadth of mind afforded by a liberal education," she said. On top of setting standards for the largest college on campus, Zamora is responsible for many of the day to day operations of HFAC. Photo By Patrick Bernard People Lois Zamora 131