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Houstonian 1998
Spring
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1998 - Spring. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1998 - Spring. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5348

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1998 - Spring, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1998
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Spring
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb1998129.jpg
Transcript Super Technology Zarana Sanghani Japan recently built a train that literally floats on air. The magic behind the train is superconductivity, and research at the University of Houston may develop the technology to make it more cost effective. Superconductors are materials that allow the movement of an electrical current without any resistance, allowing for faster and more powerful transfer of energy. They produce magnetic fields that simultaneously repel all other magnetic fields so that when a magnet is placed on top of the superconductor, the magnet will float. This is how the Japanese train is made to float, Photos courtesy of the "For thP last 10 V6SrS h3VG blowing f°r a faster, frictionless ride. ' There is one hitch: superconductors require very low temperatures. The been WOrking With StUClentS in Japanese train's superconducting O tpr.hnnlncrv must nnprafp, at temni Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston. the lab ... I'm looking forward to (moving back to the lab)." Paul Chu technology must operate at temperatures close to zero degrees Kelvin, the scientific temperature unit. (Zero degrees K is 273 degrees less than zero degrees Celsius.) Maintaining temperatures this low requires the use of expensive substances such as liquid helium. In 1987, UH's Paul Chu made a breakthrough in superconductivity by discovering a material that could operate as a superconductor at 94 degrees K requiring the much more accessible and affordable liquid nitrogen. Texas built the Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston soon after Chu's discovery. Since then, Chu has been the center's director, but next year Chu will go back to the lab to work on superconductivity research. "For the last 10 years, I have been working with students in the lab, but as the director I had time constraints and pressure," Chu said. "I'm looking forward to (moving back to the lab)." Though Chu will devote most of his time to the lab, he will remain director emeritus even after a new executive director, to be chosen by a search committee, assumes most of Chu's current responsibilities, said Susan Butler, TCSUH associate director for public affairs. "(Chu) will still be part of the management team as director emeritus," Butler said. "He will be able to devote more of his efforts where they're needed most. That's a real positive thing for us." Conitinued to pg. 172 179 April