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Houstonian 1998
Fall
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1998 - Fall. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 31, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5253.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1998 - Fall. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5253

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1998 - Fall, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 31, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5473/show/5253.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1998
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Fall
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb1998034.jpg
Transcript Affirmative Action in Universities Challenged Differing At a University of Texas student-run press conference during the week of Sept. 9, Professor Lino Graglia argued that the university should not only drop affirmative action, but that it should also stop giving special treatment to minority students. The reason: "Blacks and Mexican-Americans are not academically competitive with the whites in selective institutions," he said, and added that in their cultures, "failure is not looked upon with disgrace." In Austin, Graglia's statements began to take a life of their own, and shifted the debate away from affirmative action toward the freedom of speech. State politicians called for Graglia's ousting, and Rev. Jesse Jackson led nearly 5,000 students on a protest march. Minority students filed racial harassment complaints against the highly regarded professor, and even Graglia's supporters distanced themselves from his comments. UT's past has been a case study in racial discrimination. The school didn't accept black students until 1950, and only then under a court ruling. Starting in the 1960s, UT began to reverse its discriminatory policies, and eventually the university simply separated applications into two piles, white and minority, and took the top applicants from each. Last year, this approach was challenged successfully by a group of white law students led by Cheryl Hopwood. The students claimed they were rejected admission while less-qualified minority students were accepted. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals agreed, and ordered the university to make its admission policy more race neutral. For many of UT's minority students and some of their University of Houston counterparts, the combination of the Hopwood decision and Graglia's comments felt like a slap in the face. "Most of us graduated within the top 5 percent in our class," said Dayna Serrano, a sophomore engineering major. "Even if affirmative action got us into the university, it doesn't keep us here. We all have to take the same classes and requirements." Graglia kept a low profile while the administration reviewed formal complaints against him. After a preliminary hearing, Graglia expressed regret for his statement, and said he would encourage prospective black and Hispanic students to apply. Friends of the professor said they hoped UT will protect Graglia's tenure and his right to free speech. "The professor had every right to say what he did, but that doesn't mean he can change what has already happened," said freshman business applications major Arnold Saenz. The controversy may hold a lesson for state-run schools nationwide as they begin to change their admissions policies. In the end, a system that combines instead of separates race and merit may emerge. "The professor had every right to say what he did, but that doesn't mean he can change what has already happen," Arnold Saenz 0 September