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Houstonian 1999
World News
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1999 - World News. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 1, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5219/show/5083.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1999 - World News. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5219/show/5083

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1999 - World News, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 1, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5219/show/5083.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1999
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title World News
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb1999100.jpg
Transcript THIRD * Procter & Gamble went to court in Houston in a lawsuit alleging that Amway distributors maliciously resurrected the rumor that the company was involved with satanic cults. The maker of brands such as Ivory soap, Tide detergent, Crest toothpaste and Mr. Clean alleges that Amway distributors, including several from the Houston area, told thousands of their customers that part of Procter & Gamble's profits go to satanic cults. Amway Corp. denied the allegations, and said the company doesn't believe the rumors and has done everything it can to prevent distributors from spreading them. The rumors began about 20 years ago. They have to do with Procter & Gamble's logo, a bearded, crescent man-in-the- moon looking over a field of 13 stars. "The rumors falsely allege that the trademark is a symbol of Satanism. It says the company gives its profits to the Church of Satan, which is totally false," Procter & Gamble spokeswoman Elaine Plummer said. "It's a malicious lie that erodes the trust of customers and has cost us millions of dollars in sales." The trademark originated around 1851, when many products did not have logos, Plummer said. "Even people who could not read could see P&G's trademark and know they would get consistent quality," she said. The 13 stars represent the 13 original colonies and the man-in- the-moon was a popular decorative fancy of the 1800s, she said. When the Cincinnati-based company stopped using the mark in the 1860s, merchants receiving new shipments of soap and candles thought they were getting imitations of P&G products. So the company brought the logo back, Plummer said. According to the rumors, it depicts signs of the devil, including "666." P&G alleges that in 1995, Amway distributors revived the rumors, using Amway's vast voice mail system. ^t^^M^ At least 669 Oklahoma residents were treated for injuries throughout the state after tornadoes struck Oklahoma City. Medical staffs at area hospitals found themselves struggling to save the lives of people whose bodies had been crushed by falling walls and pierced by flying glass. "The first lady we saw had a large hole in her chest," said Dr. Dale Askins, emergency department director at Hillcrest Medical Center. "It looked like a large piece of wood had penetrated there." Hillcrest physicians stabilized one 8-year-old girl who suffered extreme head injuries and transferred her to the Children's Hospital in downtown Oklahoma City. "Her sister had a head injury also and had to be intubated and resuscitated here," Askins said. She was about 5. Those with minor injuries were treated in the hospital's cafeteria. More than 60 physicians worked on patients at Hillcrest alone. Dozens of others labored on the 150 patients who were taken to nearby Midwest Medical Center, another hospital close to Bridge Creek, a suburban community directly in the storm's path. Some people in the hospitals nearest the storm track worked on victims of the Murrah Federal Building bombing in 1995, but they didn't have to cope with so many injured. "I'm sure there were some flashbacks and connections," Askins said. "I think for the medical personnel who lived through that, it was kind of the mass casualty scene. Nurse Ted Kellison, a veteran of the 1995 bombing, said most people just did their jobs without thinking about the bombing. "It's tornado country," Kellison said. "We know what can happen." FIFTH Three U.S. soldiers, who were held captive by Yugoslav forces for more than a month, were finally freed in Croatia to a rousing welcome and the promise of swift family reunions. Jesse Jackson, the political and civil rights leader who arranged their release in a meeting with Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, said that the gesture should be used to spark a diplomatic solution to the Kosovo fighting. But President Clinton said that NATO would continue the bombing of the Serbs, although he set a meeting with Russian officials to discuss that nation's effort to help find a solution. The U.S. soldiers — Steven Gonzales, 22, of Huntsville.TX; Christopher Stone, 25, of Smiths Creek, Mich.; and Andrew Ramirez, 24, of Los Angeles — were seized near Macedonia's border with Kosovo on March 31. Although the Serbs kept them apart and the three prisoners had little access to radio, television or newspapers, it did not appear that they were tortured. Looking fit and in high spirits, the three soldiers exited the plane to cheers from a crowd on the runway. They waved and snapped to attention before being whisked by helicopter to a nearby U.S. Army hospital. They underwent three days of medical and psychological examinations at the high- security ward of the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center. Gonzales' mother, Rosie Gonzales of Huntsville, said that watching a television report of her son walking to freedom "was a deeply moving moment." "We saw the three holding their hands in the air with big smiles on their faces. It was wonderful, wonderful to see." Jackson addressed the crowd at the air base and called for the U.S. government not to miss "the window" created by the release of the soldiers to "move toward peace" with Milosevic, whose forces have been waging war with ethnic Albanian rebels in Kosovo. Z^^hCt^hC • Robert O'Sullivan, 22, of LaPorte legally won $1,000 from radio station KKRW (93.7) for legally changing his name to Obi-Wan Kenobi, as part of a publicity campaign for the "Star Wars: Episode One - The Phantom Menace" movie. • Dennis Rodman settled a lawsuit that accused him of assaulting a college student. The amount was not disclosed. • A Florida man sued Monica Lewinsky claiming she owes him 100,000 dollars in compensatory damages and 40 million dollars more for the amount spent in Ken Starr's investigation. It is not known if he will disperse the money to other taxpayers. • Amy Fisher, 24, was released after seven years in prison for shooting her lover's wife in the face. Her lover, Joey Buttafuoco, served six months in jail for statutory rape. 152 WORLD NEWS May 153