Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1999
World News
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1999 - World News. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 12, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5219/show/5082.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1999 - World News. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5219/show/5082

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1999 - World News, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 12, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/5219/show/5082.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1999
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title World News
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb1999099.jpg
Transcript NINTH FOURTEENTH Kenneth Starr, the independent counsel in the President Clinton-Monica Lewinsky scandal, said he believed the nation would be better off if the law to have an independent counsel was allowed to expire. "The statute should not be reauthorized," Starr wrote bluntly in testimony prepared for delivery. The Senate Committee on Government Affairs considered what to do about the expired statute at the end of June. Starr argued the authority to investigate political cases involving senior administration officials should be returned to the Justice Department and the Attorney General - with Congress and the press keeping watch. He also argued that the law had many serious flaws and had not achieved its main purpose, which was to provide the public with a sense that investigations of figures like the President are free from partisanship. The independent counsel law was enacted in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, which produced a wide consensus that the nation's chief law-enforcement officer, the Attorney General, had an inherent conflict in investigating the President or fellow Cabinet officers. Starr's statement was defensive of his investigation, which began with questions about Whitewater, a land deal in Arkansas in which the Clintons had invested before they came to the White House. Starr's investigation eventually included unconnected topics such as the firing of employees in the White House travel office, the improper collection of confidential FBI files on some Republicans in the Clinton White House and the President's intimate relationship with Monica Lewinsky. virus, was sent to ■Id just hours after Melissa, a computer people around the wo: it was discovered. The virus was activated when you download a file attached to an e-mail that appears to have been sent by a friend. It causes your computer to send copies of the infected e-mail to the first 5 0 folks it finds in your address book, and then the first 5 0 in all the receivers of the virus, and so on. Melissa wasn't designed to do major damage. It didn't steal information or wreck anybody's hard drive. It just clogged e-mail circuits and brought communication for thousands of institutions and individuals to a crawl. It forced the shutdown of hundreds of computer networks. The creator of the Melissa virus, David Smith, is 30 years old. Published reports said Smith wasn't exactly the most sociable fellow in the world. He's said to reside quietly with his two cats in an apartment building in Aberdeen, N.J. Neighbors seldom saw or spoke to him. It's said that Smith "lived" on the Internet. Authorities said he named Melissa for a topless dancer he used to know in Florida. Because of his actions, Smith faced the possibility of prison and a hefty fine. FOURTEENTH After a search by bomb experts and crime investigators, the bodies of 14 teens and one adult finally were removed from Columbine High School in Litdeton, Colorado. Among the 15 dead were the two gunmen, students, who attacked faculty and fellow students with bombs and gunfire before killing themselves in a second-floor library. The victims were a computer teacher who coached the girls' basketball team, 10 male students and four female students. Family members endured a 24-hour wait before they were told whose bodies were lying inside. The gunmen, who began the rampage near noon, killed two students in the parking lot. The two, wearing black trench coats and masks, detonated handmade bombs and shot students at point-blank range with shotguns and semiautomatic rifles as they roamed the school for several hours. Many students were trapped inside. The gunmen were identified as Eric David Harris, 18, and Dylan Bennet Klebold, 17, seniors who belonged to a group that caUed themselves the "Trenchcoat Mafia." Other students said the two collected guns, disliked athletes and minorities, and appeared infatuated with Nazi paraphenalia. The parents of the two gunmen expressed regret to the victims' families and the community and said they were struggling as well to understand what happened. Although investigators believe Harris and Klebold acted alone inside the school, investigators questioned eight to 10 fellow members of the "Trenchcoat Mafia." Inside the school and in automobiles in the parking lot, authorities found 30 homemade explosive devices, including Molotov cocktail-type bombs with matches as fuses and 2-foot-long propane tanks wrapped with nails and attached to pipe bombs. More bomb-making materials were found in searches of the gunmen's homes. School officials opened all schools in the Jefferson County Public School system the next day, except Columbine. School spokesman Rick Kaufman said all the schools were swept for explosives and that security was beefed up at the entrances of schools in the district, the largest in Colorado with 140 schools and 89,000 students. timeline ' President Clinton was found in contempt of court for giving intentionally false testimony about his relationship with Monica Lewinsky. •Tammy Wynette, singer of the No. 1 hit "Stand By Your Man" died in her Nashville home. She died due to a blod clot in the lungs. • Houston Rockets basketball player, Scottie Pippen was stopped for suspicion of driving while under the influence of alcohol. Pippen argues that it was a mistake. • US computers were largely unaffected by the CIH Chernobyl virus, even though several hits were recorded in Asia and Europe. CIH, which was due to trigger on the 13th anniversary of the Chernobly nuclear accident, rendered the PC useless. • The Red Cross was finally allowed to see the three US soldiers who were captured by Yugoslav forces along a disputed border. 150- WORLD NEWS April 151