Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1987
The Community
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Community. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24915.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Community. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24915

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Community, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24915.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Community
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_287.jpg
Transcript It's Happ'ning "UT out of South Africa!" shouted one young sorority member waving a Gucci bag in the air, as the campus police arrested her. At the University of Texas in Austin, like many other schools, protesting was "in" again. At UT, protesting was only allowed between noon and one o'clock on the west steps of the Administration Building facing the West Mall. During the spring of '86, anti-Apartheid rallies were becoming frequent, but were short. Then one day, students (ranging from artists to fraternity and sorority members) decided to challenge the time limit, having been warned that they would be arrested. The idea of protests similar to the sixties appealed to many. The police began arresting only minutes after the one o'clock deadline. A police line formed between the spectators and the demonstrators to prevent more students from joining the crowd on the steps. Many found it an adventure, some thought it fashionable to be arrested two and even three times, while others enjoyed watching the protesters being dragged away. After nearly an hour of arresting students repeatedly, the size of the crowd on the steps was dwindling, but the audience was growing bigger. One spectator shouted out something on the order of, why don't we join our fellow students and sit down with them. And hundreds more sat down on the opposite side of the police line, completely blocking the west mall. The campus police, facing the new task, turned and walked away. After a few moments of silence, the students soon become bored and went away. It was fun while it lasted. — Mark Lacy 289