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Houstonian 1987
The Community
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Community. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 2, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24913.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Community. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24913

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Community, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 2, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24913.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Community
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_285.jpg
Transcript Wet Rush/Dry Rush It's no news that sororities ive dry rush and now, the fra- frnities, one by one, are bitching to dry rush. But, does nyone know the real reason /hy? Dan Barnes, president of lappa Alpha, says their deci- ion to go dry was to set an xample for other fraternities. Their decision was influenced >y national chapters, to estab- ish a respectable organization. Most people," says Barnes, leave if there is alcohol. Crowds are bigger at a wet par- y, but the dry parties attract the :uys who are really interested in joining." All of the sororities have dry rush, but one Alpha Kappa Aloha member says it's because, our image is important. We don't want to look like drunks. For the girls interested in our sorority, the dry parties don't matter to them." However, AKA has an annual Champagne Sip to alleviate the monotony of dry events, "it's a more festive event for us," she says. Drunks or not, Nancy Shul- man, president of Alpha Chi Omega, says there are ways to get around dry parties. For example, a group of sorority sisters can go out as friends. That is, it would not be considered a AChiO social event if they chose not to make it open to the public. If they drink, it is a personal decision and they are not bound by AChiO rules. But even ^a couple of frat brothers just "hanging out" can cause a national scandal among their chapter. So, are the wild and crazy days of college parties gone? No more goldfish swallowing, no more traditional toga parties, and no more life long friendships made through Greek family organizations. It's all being replaced by moral values and mature virtues. It's hard to believe that everyone is in full agreement with dry rush. Well, Robert Martinez of Sigma Nu tells a different side of the story. Martinez says they are being forced to go dry next semester. Why? Because of too many law suits. "The insurance companies," explains Martinez, "are doubling the rates for chapters and lowering the coverage those rates will have." It's simply not economically feasible to have wet rush. When a rush or fraternity member is injured somehow, the chapter is blamed, whether or not the fraternity is truly responsible. Martinez gives an example of a chapter being unneccessarily prosecuted. A few UT fraternity brothers were together at a club. One of the friends went outside, drunk, to stand by the car. He apparently passed out and rolled under the car. When his friends decided to leave, they did not realize their friend was under the car, pulling out of the parking lot and dragging him about one thousand yards before discovering him. As a result, the fraternity is being sued, the club is being sued, even the parking lot owner. People automatically lash out at fraternities as being irresponsible. Obviously, this incident had nothing to do with the fraternity, other than it just so happened that some of its members were involved. The media has not helped with the Greeks' reputation. A person Alcohol, the access young college people have to it, and its place in a fraternity activity, are likely the hottest topics of the day. In fact, alcohol is now the single greatest threat to the future economic viability of the American college fraternity system. Rush is a serious time. Why meet a person under conditions that might impair our impressions of him, or his impression of us? This way, we see them at their very best and they see us at our best. We're trying to get across that we're a classy group. Rush to us isn't a time to see people drinking. Would you drink before you went to a big interview or into a big test? Increasing legal liability, the raising of the legal drinking age to 21, and the concern for dollars wasted on alcohol are all reasons why dry rush works to our benefit. We can show that there's more to fraternity life The controversy continues to grow. The first viewpoint is offered by Beth Northcutt, a sorority member, and the second by Randy Bayer, a fraternity rush chairman. than drinking and partying. We do not have to sell ourselves. Our fraternity was not founded as a drinking club. It was started to bring together groups of men who had common interests and goals, to further their education and to provide a social environment — and that involved a lot more than drinking. The practice of serving alcohol at rush parties tends to encourage drinking, often attracting large, unruly crowds. These parties have done little to encourage any positive social development for members of the fraternity or for those who attend. Finally, alcohol is posing an ever-increasing threat of legal liability. Courts are finding party hosts liable for their negligent actions where alcohol was served. — Randy Bayer says "frat party" and one automatically thinks of drunk, boisterous students raising hell. Though some parties are certainly loud and wild, they are a far cry from Animal House. Martin says he would prefer rush to stay wet, and he admits the fraternity will definately lose membership in the future with dry rush. Martinez stresses that the problem is a serious one, but that his fraternity is creating new ideas to make dry rush as successful as possible. If dry rush does not work, they will go back to wet rush, only with strict rules about the drinking. Kathy Carrol, head of the Greek organizations say, "Hopefully national influence » will bring dry rush." "Why?" some might ask, "doesn't she have faith in her s organizations?" Sure, changes are needed. For instance, eliminating dangerous hazing practices, but nothing that group support and participation can't change or that dry rush can change. — Beth Northcutt 287