Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1987
The Community
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Community. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24881.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Community. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24881

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Community, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24881.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Community
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_253.jpg
Transcript It started early in the fall se- lester. Students competing for vailable carts, luggage and lothes draped over shoulders nd hands. Trucks, U-hauls and ixies lined up outside the Cou- ar Place Residence Halls, vhile students busily moved ^longings into their rooms. A ew parents waited patiently as heir children unloaded the lsual dorm paraphenalia — )iants, stereos, TVs, posters, ramed pictures, books — all leaved haphazardly into a va- ant shell of a room that would oon be home. Hugs, kisses nd promises to call were ex- hanged expectantly and the parents drove away, leaving the students to deal with their new housing. Some students were returning veterans, quickly resolving administrative hassles. Many of the students did not have parents accompanying them. Since only seniors and graduate students are permitted to stay in Cougar Place, the average resident is older than most students. Most of them flew the coop a long time ago. Unlike Moody Towers or the Quadrangle — U of H's other dorms — Cougar Place is built like an apartment complex. Actually, they are like small bungalows. There are ten separate buildings, each housing a maximum of 40 students. The buildings are surrounded by green grass and a few trees; picnic tables are spread out along the sidewalks and lawns so students can relax, study or engage in pleasant conversation. Looking at the social scene, one may notice certain cliques have formed on the basis of ethnic, academic or athletic commonality. A group of law students, for example, can usually be found discussing the latest litigation on the benches which face the entrance to the complex. French students gather ritualistically for their nightly sitcom viewing, chattering tirelessly in their native tongue. Tennis players are easily recognized, in their white shorts and striped shirts, as they swing their cased rackets. On weekends, free movies are shown on the VCR until the last bleary-eyed insomniac surrenders to sleep. Beer and music parties are thrown intermittently throughout the semester, and students gather to get to know each other while relieving their brains from intensive studying. Most of the students are quite content with the living conditions. Except for the occasional cockroach, or perhaps a visit from a squadron of uninvited ants, the place seems like a nice arrangement for students. Martin Karrenbach of West Germany, who's studying Geophysics for a Masters degree, said that the dorms turned out to be a lot nicer than he had expected. "This is my first time in a graduate dormitory and it's very nice," he said. "It's like living in a private apartment and there are always people around if you want to talk." Karrenbach also said he found people friendly and willing to help. One thing he appreciates is the ethnic and academic diversity. "There are people from all over the world studying a whole range of things." Cliques aside, one would hardly have to travel anywhere else if they wanted exposure to different cultural groups. People from almost every race and country, from Armenia to Zimbabwe, are represented in these dorms. Ray Domingue, the area coordinator for Cougar Place, claimed there hasn't been this much excitement since Fall 1981, the semester the complex opened. "There's so much enthusiasm and excellent cooperation this year. We've been able to maintain a lot of activities, and students are becoming really involved. We've installed 20 new kitchenettes and there's a lot of participation during the weekend movie videos." Gwen Jones, a handicapped student, said that Cougar Place accommodates her special needs. "I can go right out my door and onto the sidewalk — you walk right into nature when you step out!" Nevertheless, she wishes the walls were thicker. "I can't play my stereo as loud as I'd like because the walls are so thin." Korean Pharmacy student, Kay Kim, finds living in Cougar Place very convenient. "Everything is close to campus. I can get up five minutes before class and make it on time." Her only complaint is having to cross Cullen Boulevard. "I wish they had a pedestrian bridge over the street — the traffic is so busy I'm afraid of getting run over when I cross the road." Since students live by themselves, she has no trouble keeping to herself if she chooses. "I don't have much time for interaction with students since I am so busy with my studies," Kim asserted. All in all, everybody seems to have adjusted well to living in Cougar Place. Whatever the lifestyle, Cougar Place can accommodate everyone. — Gina Son IT1 < jsa 255