Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1987
The Community
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Community. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24862.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Community. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24862

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Community, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24862.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Community
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_234.jpg
Transcript Residence Halls Evolution Security Good, History Interesting Dorm security has become tighter while regulations for women have become more liberal since the first dormitories opened in 1950, Residence Halls officials say. Two of these officials have a combined 40 years experience living and working in the campus dormitories. They said they have seen the security change for the better as the dorms have evolved from single sex to coed. Associate Director of Housing Tom Penett came to UH in 1954 as a freshman. He joined the administration in 1957. Thirty years later, he still considers UH home. He met his wife, Martha, as an undergraduate. Today she is associate director of the UH business office. They raised a son on campus and still live in an apartment in the Quad. Bobby Brownstein, assistant director of Residential Life and Housing, estimates that he has been at UH about 10 years, both as an undergraduate and as an employee of the residence halls. Brownstein lived in both the Quad and the Towers and moved off campus just last year. Dorm security has changed with social and parental standards in the years since Penett and Brownstein came to UH, Penett said. "You have to recognize that dorm regulations follow parental pressure," he said. "It's not so much what we want, as what the parents and guardians consider acceptable." Sweet Sixteen. Tom Penett, who met his wife, Martha, on the steps of Oberholtzer Hall, cuts the Towers sixteenth birthday cake in Moody Cafe. Photo by Merry Jones. "Security was what was expected." Today, UH residence halls can accommodate 2,100 students. Currently, dorms are 95 percent full, said Holly Ster- neckert, Director of Residential Life and Housing. Penett said that before Moody Towers opened in 1970, UH's 700 to 800 residental students lived in the Quad: men in Oberholtzer, Taub and Sette- gast, women in Bates and Law. Students and strangers in the men's dorms came and went as they pleased, he said, because the outside doors were kept unlocked. "The doors were basically wide open," he said. But women "dormies" had curfews, locked doors and special visitation hours for males, he said. Women residents had to pass through a reception room to get in and out of the building. Until the '60s, they also were regulated by housemothers, "typically a little old lady with tennis shoes who ran the building and kept up with everybody," Penett said. Housemothers were phased out in the late '60s, he said, roughly the same time the Quad began to go coed. Students who planned to be gone for extended periods of time had to sign out before leaving, he said. "There were few security problems then. Someone would throw a brick through a window (for example)." Penett said visitation was more restricted then than it is now. "We didn't have a lot of outsiders, and those we had, had to be out by a certain time. "They had to sign in and sign out, and they sure as hell better have done it by curfew time," Penett said. When the Towers op r*d only the North Tower, th fe. male dorm, adopted Bates and Law's sign-in and visitor oli. cies, he said. The South Tower adt >ted the relaxed security of the • ther men's dorms. A group of unarmed oot patrol officers slowly eve ved into the UHPD's profess >nal peace officers, he said. The transition came about as a r suit of the "wild '60s," he said, and similar transitions occurre< on campus nationwide. At one point the polia pa- troled in jeeps and on n Dtor scooters, but were event ally replaced by the patrol cars hey use today, he said. But while the jeeps and scooters were able to pene rate the campus, the cars are t on- fined to its perimeters, w lich may render them less effec ive, he said. "People don't walk d )wn 236