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Houstonian 1987
The Community
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Community. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24848.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Community. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24848

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Community, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24848.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Community
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_220.jpg
Transcript Willie Nelson Hell / nd Farm Aid II- Too Much If you ask, a lot of people in / istin will tell you when they d e, they are going to Willie F* dson heaven. But some may r< :onsider after living through V illie's creation, Farm Aid II at h anor Downs. It was no won- d r that 45,000 people turned o t under 95 degree crystal ci ar sky and blazing Texas si ishine for what is traditionally Willie's Annual Fourth of Ji y Picnic. When we rolled into Austin at 4 am, traffic on Highway 290 w s already jammed and the p< lice were just arriving to han- dl; the parking problem. We re ted and left Austin at 9 am to m ke the six mile pilgrimage ea ;t to Manor. It only took four h( urs — that's better than one m le per hour — to travel to the lc ation that had been uncer- ta i until days before the event. It was evident that the costli- nt s of insuring a production of th s magnitude, having to cl nge the location several tir es, had left its organization in i state of hurried confusion. vVe filed past the ticket taker and metal detectors around or - o'clock, anticipating the K irs ahead. A sign read "No G iss - No Cans - No Furni- tu ?." We finally turned a cor- ne after an endless row of por- tei le toilets and sure enough, to tn< right and left as far as the ey could see, activity — kids tl owing water, cowboys drinking beer from plastic jugs, *e Playboy Girls of Rock and Roll were on the stage. Every- 3°dy that claims to be anybody ted shown up to the benefit for formers and all the entertainers tlaimed to be Willie's good friend. We had waited helplessly while the Blasters came over the radio. George Jones was also on early, before he got drunk. Waylon and Willie had performed "Mamas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys," but we finally arrived amongst all of Willie's friends with more than twelve hours ahead. The day was full of surprises such as the Grateful Dead being simulcast on the giant monitors and sound system, and pale-faced Exene Cervenka of X appearing in the daylight. The Nelsons broke into a Led Zepplin cover (one of those songs without a name) creating havoc — biker women stripped their tops exposing their tatoos while playing air guitars. Other local favorites were Joe Ely, the Fabulous Thunderbirds and of course Stevie Ray Vaughn's highlighting performance. High energy sets were provided by the frantic Jason and the Scorchers, Steppenwolf ("Born to be Wild") and a spectacular six member band from L.A., the Unforgiven. The legends were also glad to come to the stage, legends like Roger Miller and Arlo Guthrie. It seemed as if the list would never end. It was apparent that everyone wanted to see Neil Young and John Cougar Mellencamp — who featured Maria McKee of Lone Justice, but didn't perform "Rain on the Scarecrow," a song about the plight of farmers. Most wouldn't leave without seeing the end, but exhaustion beat many of the fans. As the evening wore on, I had the feeling that this is one of those rare occasions when you are given too much for your money — over 80 acts in all. The cost of all this fun and sun: just $20 and a trip through the dreaded parking maze. When it all seemed said and done, Willie, who had been on the stage since sun-up, decided to play a set that wouldn't stop. It was as if he had given the crowd all it could handle and said, "don't complain to me." Perhaps that was the major flaw of Farm Aid II — there was too much of everything: too much sun and too much music to absorb in one day. It truly was Willie Nelson hell, but for the money and the cause, it was worth it. — Mark Lacy Farm Aid appears to be great fun for these two children. But the reality of the situation is that one family farm goes under every six minutes in the USA. That would mean 180 farms may have failed during the course of this fun-filled day. Jason of the Scorchers put everything he had into their set on this Fourth of July, 1986. He is the son of an independent farm family. 221