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Houstonian 1987
The Classrooms
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24803.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24803

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24803.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Classrooms
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_175.jpg
Transcript Upon retiring, Fred Baldwin, the head of photojournalism at UH will concentrate all of his efforts on the 1988 Houston International Foto Fest. He is the founder of Foto Fest and given the popularity of the 1986 event, it will be an even greater accomplishment to repeat that success. In 1984, Baldwin was busy talking up a storm, trying to set the wheels in motion to create the world's largest festival of photography — a sizeable ambition. There were skeptics at UH that wanted compromises. Many people thought that Fred couldn't handle a task as big as his imagination, but he did. He took his show on the road — outside of the University — en listing the support of Benteler Gallaries as a home base and many photographic and non- photographic related sponsors. What would be a concurrent 35-exhibition festival in March '86, soon grew to 63 exhibitions, from Diverse Works to Coca Cola Headquarters. Foto Fest incorporated the education community as well with exhibits on campus at Blaffer Gallery, Lawndale Annex and M.D. Anderson Library. At Rice, the galleries, the museum and the media center were booked. From hard news to fine arts, childrens photography, travel photography, space photography . . . the festival presented all kinds. Anything was possible — from the famous Robert Frank at the Museum of Fine Arts, to the innovative Bernard Faucon at the Houston Center for Photography, to the controversial Joel Peter Witkin at Butler Gallery. Baldwin decided that the first Month of Photography in the United States should also be first in the world. So he organized "the Meeting Place" in the Warwick Hotel lobby. A person could discuss photography with John Szarkowski, Robert Heinecken, Duane Mi- chals, Helmut Newton, William Klein, Suzanne Szasz, Martin Parr . . . With over 100 distinguished guests from fifteen countries around the world, the public Meeting Place was the big topper. When it was all over, Fred's grand idea — the 1986 Foto Fest — had attracted 175,000 people to Houston and brought $7 million in revenue to the economy. Metro established bus routes to facilitate transportation and twenty-three hotels set aside rooms (15,400 room nights) to accomodate visitors. By no means did the Foto Fest fall short of its expectations. In 1988, the Society of Photographic Educators is planning its convention in Houston during the Foto Fest. From February 26 - March 25, the 1988 Month of Photography will be no breeze to organize. In the ever-changing world of photography, there will be new and greater challenges to meet in every aspect of the festival. "I am very sorry. I am very sorry to lose contact with the students particularly. That's the part I enjoyed the most. But to do the job right, I would have had to incorporate more of what I'm putting into Foto Fest. Teaching and administering a million dollar program, plus trying to do some freelance work and a couple of book projects I'm working on — there just aren't enough hours in the day. It would have been nice to have a marriage of the two (Foto Fest and teaching), but that is not practical with the current setup. I really am sorry that it (Foto Fest) is not attached in some way to the university, but by nature, these things have to be done with a great deal of flexibility. People have to give you a wide authority and support to do it, and the structure of controls here would have made it difficult. We have the best festival in the country. We could have had the best photographic program in the country but for a lack of vision on the part of the people who couldn't see that. It is really not surprising, because you don't find that kind of vision in many places. It's really hard within a university. Nobody else in this country has created what I had in mind. I would have brought in people. Experts. National and International photojournalism experts, who could have really put some excitement into the program. Bring them in for a couple of weeks to turn people on. The problem with that was that it takes a certain amount of funding and organizational effort, and when I realized that the university had some other priorities and there was a real problem economically at the school, I saw that this wasn't going to be possible. So I started putting some energy into doing the same thing with an international arena, with Foto Fest. I didn't think the conditions were right to develop that (Foto Fest) in a declining economy at the university. But I was able to develop it independently — on my own — in terms of a festival. We'll have 21 photographers in Houston, running 12 workshops. The festival will have some of the finest photographers in the world. They didn't think I could do it, probably. It probably seemed like a hairbrained scheme to a lot of people. But I thought it would work — and it did." Interview with Fred Baldwin by Daniel Alder. 175