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Houstonian 1987
The Classrooms
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 3, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24801.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24801

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 3, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24801.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Classrooms
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_173.jpg
Transcript "I find that students are expected to be recepticles and professors just to pour in all of the knowledge." track event were not good enough to do anything with, but armed with his new press credentials he returned to the Swedish foreign office and secured a pass to Lappland. He went and photographed the Lapps, then returned to Stockholm to find that, once again, he had taken bad pictures. He went back to the foreign office with a tragic story of a broken camera and secured another pass for the journey north. This time he got some good pictures. He sent them to an agent he knew in New York, and she soon wrote back saying that she had just sold the photos to Sports Illustrated. Baldwin had accomplished his first major magazine breakthrough. The next big event that Baldwin was able to talk his way into despite a lack of proper credentials, was a royal party thrown for Nobel laureates at the Stockholm city hall. After just barely getting in, Baldwin ended up chatting with the King of Sweden as the press attache from the American embassy followed close behind carrying his camera equipment. He next went to Norway to shoot pictures of the codfishing industry for the National Geographic. At least that's what he told the fishermen. At the time, the Geographic had probably never heard of Fred Baldwin, and they certainly had not sent him to photograph codfish. But there he was, above the Arctic Circle, in the Lofoten Islands. It was there Baldwin met an old newspaper writer who had been a resistance fighter in the war. Jokingly, the newswriter suggested that Baldwin get into the water and photograph cod- fishing from the point of view of the codfish. Baldwin thought it was a great idea. Before he was through, he had enlisted the aid of the Norwegian Navy which sent him off on a destroyer with a diving team to produce a story which eventually was published by the National Geographic. Baldwin quickly developed a reputation with the magazine industry as a man who could get the job done, whether it was photgraphing gypsies in the south of France or leading an arctic polar bear expedition for Life Magazine. We paused to give the waiter room to clear our table and then Baldwin started telling me about the "serious work" that he had done. In 1962 he became involved in the Civil Rights Movement, as a photographer, fundraiser, and organizer. In 1964 he accepted a position as Peace Corp director in Borneo. After spending two years there, Baldwin decided that administrative work was not for him and returned to his former role as a photographer. He photographed in India, Afghanistan, Thailand and the Far East, and then returning to the U.S., began doing commercial advertising assignments for resorts. As I sucked on my last ice cube, Baldwin told me how he used his photographs to help a doctor raise $600,000 to build a clinic in a poverty stricken area of South Carolina. Clearly it is this type of work that he is most proud of. His interest has turned more and more away from what he calls "superficial magazine projects", and toward serious documentary work. In 1972 he focused on Texas and produced a body of work that brought his him first major art exhibition at the Philips Collection in Washington, D.C. In 1975 Baldwin started teaching documentary photography at the University of Texas, and in 1981 came to the University of Houston. In Houston, Baldwin put together the largest photo festival in the western hemisphere. Dubbed Fotofest, it debuted in 1986 and Baldwin is currently raising funds for the next festival in 1988. This year he has raised three quarters of a million dollars and he expects the figure to be one million by year's end. The lunch crowd was start- EDITORS NOTE: ing to thin out as we took up the topic of education. "In my teaching," Baldwin said, "I want people to speak out and come up with their own opinions. If I think their reasoning is stupid, then I'll argue with them. But I don't expect them to agree with me. I expect them to think for themselves, and I don't find our education conducive to that kind of approach. I find that students are expected to be recepticles and professors just to pour in all of the knowledge. I just find that ridiculous." Baldwin paused for a moment. He looked at his watch. "Oh my god, We're late for class." - Dan Alder From the first time he sends a student to take a picture of the thing they are most afraid of (usually a policeman), Fred Baldwin's teaching methods utilize bold notions and far out ideas as a means for overcoming obstacles. Most students tend to wonder if it is possible, in this day and age, to set out to accomplish something the way Fred did in his younger days. They say, the world was different then. But ocassionaly one of his students takes a giant step toward doing something they really want to do, with courage they probably couldn't get from anyone but Fred Baldwin. 173