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Houstonian 1987
The Classrooms
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24798.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24798

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24798.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Classrooms
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_170.jpg
Transcript ''Almost Anything Is Within Your Grasp As Long As You Can Conquer Your Fear And Apply Your Imagination" Fred Baldwin Prepares To Move On Looking at the clock, I realized that once again my photography teacher would be fashionably late for class. Well, perhaps traditionally is the right word. It was not long before he came through the door. As usual he was dressed in baggy pants with stuffed pockets. I have never seen him wear a tie; of course it would look kind of funny with a safari shirt. A heavy bag of camera equipment hung from one shoulder, and with his other arm he pinned a folder stuffed with papers to his side. Unla- dening himself, he dropped into the chair behind the desk at the front of the room, then puffing up his cheeks he blew out a long slow breath of air. With both hands he combed his white hair back over his ears until his fingers meshed at the back of his head. Leaning way back in his chair, he placed his moccassined feet on the desk and addressed the class with raised eyebrows and an expression that seemed to ask, 'Well, what do you want to do today!' The room was silent for a minute. "Well, what do you want to do today," he asked. Outside of the classroom, I had heard a lot about Fred Baldwin. I had heard him described as a famous photographer and a world traveler. I knew he had worked for the country's best magazines. I decided to ask him to consent to a personal interview. He accepted and we made a lunch date for the following Tuesday. I tracked him down Tuesday after my morning class and we decided to conduct the interview at a local Chinese restaurant. We had an hour and a half before we had to be back for afternoon classes. As we got into Baldwin's BMW he started his story in 1955 at Columbia University. At that time he was entering his last year of college, and as he saw it, his last year of freedom. Faced with realization, Baldwin made an important decision. "I decided to go to Europe," he told me as he drove. "I went to Paris where I got mixed up with this woman and went to a lot of night clubs and parties and so on. I had a good time." Determined to have a variety of different experiences, Baldwin left the Paris night life to spend several weeks living with Mormon missionaries. Then it was off to spearfish on an island in the south of France. But the adventure that would most affect his life was yet to come. He set out to visit Pablo Picasso. Not minding the artist's reputation of being impossible to interview, Baldwin found his house in Cannes, knocked on the door, and told the doorman he was a famous American journalist and had come to interview Monsieur Picasso. "I was scared to death," said Baldwin. "Here's the worlds' greatest artist, and here I am a young squirt from Columbia University. Of couse, I didn't get in. But I persisted." After four days of persisting Baldwin still had not gotten past the front door. But while studying a book on Picasso's latest exhibition, The Human Comedy, he discovered what he thought might be the key. He noted a bizzare humor which permeated the work, and it gave him an idea. "I decided that that was the way I had to get to him," Baldwin said as we pulled in front of the restaurant. "I had to do something slightly outrageous. So I wrote him a letter which said, "Monsieur Picasso, I have been sitting here on your doorstep for four days." Then I drew a picture of myself on the second day with this beard, and on the third day with this long beard coming down. I wrote, "Soon I am going to look like Moses, and I'd like to come in and take some pictures of you so I can go to Florence, where I have some money, and shave my beard off." Then I drew a picture of myself in Florence with a big smile on my face while shaving off this beard. "Well I sent this letter in and two minutes later Picasso sent his daughter out to get me. He wanted to see my beard!" Inside the restaurant Baldwin continued his life story between mouthfuls of rice, skillfully managed with chopsticks. Fork in hand, I listened intently as he told me how his experience with Picasso had taught him an inspirational lesson. "Almost anything is within 170