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Houstonian 1987
The Classrooms
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24789.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24789

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24789.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Classrooms
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_161.jpg
Transcript Lacking wobbly rabbit ears or telescoping antennas, the mi- crostrip antenna is "rugged and essentially indestructible," Long iaid. The antennas receive and insmit radio signals using fre- uencies in the microwave inge, 300 megahertz to 30 gi- ahertz, with waves that are a ew meters to a few centimeters i i length. This distance is better \ ppreciated by comparison with tie approximately quarter- nile-long waves of AM radio : ations that broadcast in kilo- I ertz. In order to explain printed i ircuit antennas and the work t lat Long's team is doing, a de- i cription of the evolution of i lodern Microelectronics is i ecessary. Essentially, everything is get- t ng smaller and smaller. Glass and metal electron l abes were used until the 1950s /hen engineers designed the iirst transistor. The tubes were ! irge and heavy, generated great 1 eat and broke easily. Most of i s have seen them in old radios and TV sets. Usually made of silicon and i oout the size of a matchstick, I le transistor that replaced lem revolutionized electronics, ransistors made it possible to ( onnect electronic devices by 1 ires on small circuit boards. A c >mplete circuit could be made c one time, for less cost, and | ugged into a piece of equip- i lent. Next, engineering found a 1 ay to dispense with most of t ie wires in the circuit. They began painting, or "printing," the boards with thin lines of silver or other metals to connect all the separate electronic devices. "Integrated" circuits soon followed in which thousands of individual transistors and other electronics were printed on think slices of silicon no larger than a postage stamp. Presently, antennas still remain separate from the rest of the electronics. Although the antenna is etched onto a microwave printed circuit board so that it shares the surface with the circuit, the two are not integrated. Long and his team seek to make the antenna and the rest of the circuit whole. Their prototype testing is done inside a special chamber that simulates the atmosphere in outer space with walls of an absorbent material that blots out signals and prevents rebounding waves and echoes. The chamber, located in the new engineering building, became operational about two years ago and cost approximately $200,000 to construct and supply with measuring equipment. The researchers also are working to make microstrip antennas that will receive and transmit using extremely high frequencies (30 gigahertz to 300 gigahertz). Waves at these frequencies are only a few millimeters long and dramatically increase the ability of antennas designed for microwave frequencies to send and receive weak signals. Shorter wave lengths achieve higher resolution, greater band width and more resistance to jamming and interference. Also, smaller objects require higher frequencies for detection, so radar would be refined with millimeter waves. Similarly, waves used in non-destructive evaluation of aircraft parts to determine small flaws would detect smaller defects when shorter lengths are used. Long and his team have been funded by the U.S. Army Research Office and Texas Advanced Technological Research. "The army's primary purpose in developing the microstrip antenna is naturally for military utilization, though there are obviously many other uses for them too," Long said. "An example of that is the space program." He said the new contract will not be NASA's first use of microstrip antennas. Astronauts on lunar missions have already utilized the flat antennas on their backpack radios because the projecting wire antennas used in the early missions could catch • on things, be bent or completely broken away. "There's still enough glamour in the space • industry to make a project like that special," Long said. "It's fun to think we'll be a small part of NASA's program, that antennas we've designed will be used on the space station." — Marilyn Swanson 161