Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1987
The Classrooms
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24787.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24787

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24787.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Classrooms
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_159.jpg
Transcript Since September, engineers in the UH Enhanced Oil Recovery Laboratory have been enjoying X-ray vision. "We have capabilities no one else has," said Harry Deans, professor of chemical engineering and EOR Director. Deans is describing the extraordinary capabilities of the X-Ray CT Scanning system recently acquired by the EOR Laboratory. The device, traditionally used to diagnose body tissue disorders, has been borrowed them medicine and idapted for oil field research. "We've removed a lot of nedicine's constrantes from the nachine," he said. "Because our targets have wo or three times the density >f the human body, we need % X-ray doses. So, we scan onger and use high settings on he tubes." Core samples from oil fields ire being studied with the CT Scan to determine how oil flows through rock. "A lot of oil is trapped and never gets to the well," Deans said. Our research is focused on improving the process of getting what's there out of the rock and at a reasonable cost. If it can't be done economically, it's a waste of time." X-Ray CT is a computer- controlled technique for imaging cross sections inside an opaque object. Scanners have been bought by the industry as they are replaced with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance machines in the medical field. UH, with a matching grant from the National Science Foundation, purchased EOR's fourth-generation scanner for $125,000, about 10 percent of the machine's original cost. However, EOR, which was established in 1984, receives its funding primarily from industrial sponsors. The research consortium currently has 18 member companies that each pay annual dues of $15,000. These fees cover laboratory operation costs, machine maintenance, theoretical research by graduate students and proprietary research for individual companies in the consortium. CT is the abbreviation for Computerized Tomography. The word tomography derives from the Greek word "tomos," meaning slices, and "graph" meaning picture. The name is an exact description of the scanner's mode of operation, because a CT nondestructively "slices" and displays the interior of the object being studied. In CT, an X-ray source moves in a circular path around the object in a controlled time rotation. At each angle of rotation, 720 detectors, which are in a fixed array, pick up any radiation that passes through the target and obtains a one-dimensional projection. A computer mathematically processes these projections to create a two-dimensional image. The object is then moved in one millimeter increments and a series of slices are imaged. From sequential, overlapping cross sections, any other plane through the body can be reconstructed by the computer. These reconstructions produce three-dimensional representations of the object. In the EOR laboratory, an image can be taken and reconstructed on the console in 20 to 30 seconds, Deans said. The images are stored on disk and magnetic tape. Since oil is found in porous rock such as limestone, a scan of oil field samples with the pores evacuated looks like Swiss cheese. Deans said they are filling the pores, under pressure, with xenon gas — which stops X-rays just like rock does. As a result, the whole sample appears solid — except for any irregularities in the rock itself. Soon, tests will be conducted in which helium, a gas that has no X-ray absorption, is forced in the core samples at high pressure. Xenon will then be flowed in to displace it. "The speed at which it fills all the holes will be very interesting. This is the data we're after," Deans said. "By working with high pressure, the displacement process will be slow enough for us to take repeated pictures and watch it happen." This process will correspond to what's happening in the ground when water is flowed in to displace oil and force it out. "It's something we need to understand," he said. Deans, who taught at Rice University before coming to UH in 1982, said they will only be doing pure research in the laboratory. "There are no direct commercial aspects of our research." But plans will include making the X-ray machine available for multi-disciplinary use. The civil engineering department already has suggested using the scanner to study concrete stress, Deans said. Electronic Music Inc., a company owned by the Beatles, developed the first modern CT Scan. — Marilyn Swanson 159