Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1987
The Classrooms
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24786.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24786

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24786.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Classrooms
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_158.jpg
Transcript A University immunologist is researching a potential effective approach to fighting cancer. The approach, known as immunotherapy, recruits elements of the body's own immune system to attack malignant cells while leaving healthy cells intact; it holds out the possibility of a bodywide treatment of cancer. Robert Faith, immunologist and laboratory animal veterin arian at UH, is conducting immunotherapy research with methionine-enkaphaline and le- cuine-enkephalin, natural pena- peptides found in the body. "So far collected data indicate methionine-enkephalin will reduce the amount of cancer spread through the blood and will also inhibit tumor growth," he said. Faith has researched the effect of methionine-enkephalin on black mice for the past year, particularly concentrating upon treating melanoma — a dangerous form of skin cancer that often spreads to internal organs through the blood. "The enkephalins can bind to brain cells and alter their function because the nerve cells have receptors for them," Faith said. They have pain-killing prop erties and alter brain cell function the same way drugs like morphine do, he said. "It's possible that these compounds account for runner's high," he said. "Both runners and aerobic exercisers have large amounts of them." Faith said he uses mice in his experiments because they have a transplantable tumor system that makes them controllable in laboratory testing. After melanoma cancer cells are grown in them, the mice are intravenously injected with penapeptide to enhance NK cell activity, he said. "The compound hasn't stopped growth because it hasn't been used in correct dosages yet," he said. "It may stop it totally; melanoma is a receptive tumor to NK cells." Faith said penapeptides natu - rally released by beneficial stress will incubate with lymphocytes in a normal individual and increase the body's supply of natural killer cells. NK cells, which began to be recognized in the 1970s, are a subpopulation of lymphocytes that spontaneously recognize and selectively kill certain tumor cells; therefore, they seem to be particularly involved in "immune surveillance" against malignancies, he said. Faith said immunotherapy, known as biological response modification, is based upon the "immune surveillance" theory that says a properly functioning immune system constantly rejects malignant cells as they appear in the body. If the immune system is misfiring, however, the cells grown can form a tumor. Evidence indicates immune deficits of several kinds are common in many cancers. But stress can alter immune responses, as research into the mutual interactions of the nervous and immune systems has proved. These systems are so highly integrated they are able to "talk" back and forth to coordinate their activities. Consequently, the nervous system affects immune responses, and immune responses can alter nerve cell activity. Faith said there are two types of stress — beneficial and incapacitating. Beneficial stress can be healthy, since it stimulates the body's immune responses, but incapacitating stress can repress NK cell activity and increase an individual's susceptibility to physical illness. Faith said he is only in the preliminary stages of his research and that leucine-enkephalin, a stronger penapeptide than metionine-enkaphaline has not been tested yet. "I think it may be more active and efficient, but it may also be addictive." Faith said he and his collaborators in immunotherapy, who are working in other labs around the country, will test with additional tumors in the future. It is only with the past five years that genetic-engineering technology has made large quantities of natural body substances, like enkephalins, available to researchers. Scientific American magazine reports that immunological approaches probably will not replace surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, but investigators are nonetheless confident they will augment established treatments. Faith doesn't disagree. "We're going to be treating cancers much more effectively with a combination of methods," he said. Immunotherapy will be useful in combination with chemotherapy or radiation or as a follow-up to surgery." Faith said different cancers are different diseases and thus require different treatment. "Multicomponent treatment is the best, most effective way of dealing with them," he said. It is only within the past five years that genetic-engineering technology has made large quantities of natural body substances like enkephalins, available to researchers. — Marilyn Swanson v 158