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Houstonian 1987
The Classrooms
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24784.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24784

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24784.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Classrooms
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_156.jpg
Transcript Peter Huang is a graduate student working with Dr. Paul Chu. He is conducting experiments on a superconducting material developed at UH. Photos by Michael Williams. plains. The size of the shield, up to 50 feet in diameter, creates an immense volume of high-quality vacuum, thousands of times larger than anything comparable on earth, according to Chu and Ignatiev. Since there are no vacuum chamber walls required in space, which limit the usable volume of an earth bound vacuum, both men believe this technology can be part of a large production facility in space. The products could be of any of a number of microelectronics devices, magnetic components and novel materials. Due to the advantage of being produced in space, these products would cost less and be of higher quality than any comparable devices produced on earth. For example, space produced components can use higher quality materials, such as gallium arsenide, which are difficult to synthesize in large quantities on earth, Ignatiev explains. These high-quality components will result in, among other things, faster computers. The center's research and development effort will be divided into four project areas. The first area will study adaptation of MBE and CBE technology to space, with its primary concern being the development of the wake shield. A second project area will address semiconductor materials and devices for development in space. A third area will study the development and fabrication of metallic materials by MBE and CBE. The final project area will handle the development of a major space epitaxy facility. "This center can mark the beginning of a major new industry for Houston that encompasses both space and microelectronics. Cooperative industry and University centers such as this illustrate the importance of University research to the city and the state's economic development efforts," UH President Richard L. Van Horn said. Strides* UH-Clear Lake is joining an old friend and neighbor in a new research initiative. This summer, officials at UH-Clear Lake and NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) announced a joint research partnership resulting in the establishment of the Research Institute for Computing and Information Systems (RICIS) by UH-Clear Lake. This center has been established to plan and execute an integrated research program in advanced data processing systems. Specifically, RICIS will support the computing needs of JSCs various missions, including all administrative, engineering, and science responsibilities. RICIS will receive up to $2.8 million annually from JSC during the next three years. As the program matures, both UH- Clear Lake and JSC officials believe that local industries will become involved as sponsors of computing-related research. The RICIS mission is to conduct, coordinate, and disseminate research on computing and information systems among researchers, sponsors, and users from UH-Clear Lake, JSC, and other universities, other research institutes, industry and other NASA centers. Already participating are Softec and GHG Corporation and negotiations are underway with the University of Michigan, MIT, and Rice University. RICIS will initially concentrate on accumulating a knowledge and experience base to aid in developing advanced computing and information systems technology for potential use in NASA missions, according to Dr. A. Glenn Houston, a UH- Clear Lake computer science faculty member and director of RICIS. This will help to identify technology gaps and the research needed to fill those gaps, Houston says. Both institutions will share computing and educational facilities to conduct the research. At UH-Clear Lake, the program will rely on the interdisciplinary involvement of faculty and students from all four schools (Business and Public Administration, Human Sciences and Humanities, Education, and Sciences and Technologies) and will involve other universities and research organizations with common interest. Steering committees at both institutions will provide long- term direction to RICIS. Sitting on the UH-Clear Lake committee are Drs. Charles Hardwich. Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost; E. T. Dick- erson, Dean, School of Sciences and Technologies; Joan Michael, Dean, School of Education; Wayne Miller, Dean, School of Human Sciences and Humanities; and L. Todd Johnson, Dean, School of Business and Public Administration. Also on the committee are David A. Hart, Executive Director Computing and Planning, and James T. Hale, Vice President for Administration and Finance. This cooperative effort is not the first joint UH-Clear Lake/ JSC project. Just three years ago, these neighboring institutions established the joint 156